Poul Anderson

Poul William Anderson was born November 25, 1926 in Bristol, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of Minnesota, where he earned his Bachelor's degree in physics. While attending college, his first stories were published by John W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction. After graduation he made no attempt to work in his field, preferring free-lance writing. He met his wife Karen Kruse at the 1952 World Science Fiction Convention, held in Chicago. They married in 1953 and had one daughter, Astrid (now married to fellow science fiction author Greg Bear). Together they founded the Society for Creative Anachronism.

His first published story Tomorrow's Children appeared in 1947 and he published his first novel Vault of the Ages in 1952. By 1953, Anderson was becoming a force in the field of science fiction. That year alone he published nearly twenty short stories as well as Three Hearts and Three Lions, War of Two Worlds, and Brain Wave, probably his most famous novel. During the 1960s, Anderson began to formulate and write his Technic History series which comprises no less than ten novels spread over two distinct sequences. Anderson had a penchant for writing series of stories and novels. He enjoyed working in his various universes, but because of the time between the volumes and the interlinked complexity of the work, it became difficult for the market and the fans to trace the time lines accurately.

A recurring theme in Mr. Anderson's writing is the importance of individual liberty and free will. This earned him a reputation as being politically fairly far to the right. Mr. Anderson said he championed the radically bold concepts of the founding fathers from which we have been retreating ever since. He is known as a hard science fiction writer, relying on heavy research and his background in physics. He firmly held that going into space was not an unnecessary luxury, but rather an essential need and that abandoning space would doom humanity to a society of brigands ruling over peasants. In the early years of the Cold War, Anderson pinned his hopes on the United Nations developing a true world government; he later repudiated this notion and found himself horrified at the idea of America or the Soviet Union winning complete rule over Earth. He assumed that the imposition of an American military rule over the entire world would entail the destruction of American democracy and the imposition of a harsh tyrannical rule over the United States' citizens.

Mr. Anderson won three Nebula Awards and seven Hugo Awards, all for his short works. He did not win any major award for his novels until 2001 when Genesis won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He was named the Science Fiction Writers Association's Grand Master in 1997 and inducted in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2000. According to his wife, its unknown how many books he had written as they stopped counting at 100. Poul Anderson died July 31, 2001 from prostate cancer.

The Enemy Stars

""They named her Southern Cross and launched her on the road whose end they would never see." In this superior novel of life and death in the farthest reaches of outer space, the reader is taken on a voyage which is at once an epic venture and a supreme testing of the human spirit. Then generations after the Southern Cross's take-off, successive crews are still being sent out to man it and the four who guide the ship to its final destiny are men we know well by the time we board it: the wealthy and intellectual physicist, Terangi Maclaren; the gentle pilot, Nakamura; Dave Ryerson, the timid son of a space-faring father; and the rebellious colonist, engineer CHang Sverdlov. When the Southern Cross burns out its drive farther from Earth than man has ever ventured before, the lives of the four hang on the minute chance they can effect repairs in space. In their appalling aloneness they find that the need to resolve their clashing natures is as important as scientific knowledge and physical teamwork. It is soon evident that not all four can expect rescue...With The Enemy Stars, Poul Anderson joins that small circle of science fiction writers who can project absorbingly the widest horizon of a limitless future and still not lose sight of men as individuals."

Original Publication: Lippincott, 1959
This Edition: Lippencott, 1959
Cover Art: Eric Carle
Format: Hardback

Notes:

This novel was first serialized in Astounding Science Fiction as We Have Fed Our Sea in August 1958. The title used in the magazine is clearly derived from the last part of Rudyard Kipling's The Song of the Dead published by Appleton and Company in 1900. Anderson is attempting to draw analogy between sailors dying at sea to give honor to their country with the efforts made by the Terrans to reach the stars. There is also a short story sequel to this novel entitled The Ways of Love which can be found in a collection called Explorations, published by Tor in 1991.

Review:


Let the Spaceman Beware!

"The men on the spaceship Quetzal had a mission to perform, but everything indicated it would be a simple matter to set up a refueling station on the planet Gwydion. Advance explorations had already determined that the inhabitants of Gwydion were few in number and thoroughly amiable in their ways. In fact, such concepts as anger, thievery, murder and warfare did not exist for them. All that remained for the Quetzal was to find a suitable site and cement friendly relations. But with the change of season and the bursting of the countryside into blossom, strange things began to happen. There was talk of a mysterious cycle and a day of danger. What was the secret of the planet that the Gwydoinites themselves dared not mention? How would it affect their spacemen visitors?"

Original Publication: Ace Books, 1963
This Edition: Ace Books, 1963
Cover Art: Ed Emshwiller
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Ace Double # F-209 with Kenneth Bulmer's The Wizard of Starship Poseidon

Review:


Ensign Flandry

"Green Alien Green Hero - Dominic Flandry had a great future ahead of him as savior of the civilized universe. In later years his talent for swift action would be unmatched, his reputation fabulous. But here he is at the age of nineteen, fresh out of the navel Academy, naive...and smack in the midst of the opening battle of an interstellar war. With no place to turn for help! For what can one innocent young Terran do against the might of the Merseian Empire - particularly when his own planet's armadas are hot on his tail for desertion, high treason, and worse?"

Original Publication: Chilton, 1966
This Edition: Lancer, 1972
Cover Art: Josh Kirby
Format: Paperback

Notes:

The second sequence in The Technic History series is the Terran Empire period, featuring Imperial Intelligence agent Dominic Flandry. This is the first of that sequence and is followed by A Circus of Hells, The Rebel Worlds, A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows and several short stories.

Review:


The Star Fox

"No one will believe the truth about the Alerionia people's plot to claim the almost untouched planet of New Europe. Only Gunnar Heim, a space-age patriot, will risk his own death and the destruction of interplanetary peace to bring freedom to this strange new world of surreal people, walking forests, slaughter machines - and the haunting memories of lost love. Poul Anderson is one of science fiction's foremost talents and the winner of its most coveted honor, the Hugo Award. Other Signet science fiction books by Poul Anderson include A Circus of Hells, The Horn of Time, Beyond the Beyond, and The Rebel Worlds."

Original Publication: Doubleday, May 1965
This Edition: Signet, July 1971
Cover Art: Gene Szafran
Format: Paperback

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Satan's World

"Thousands of years away in time and space spins a planet whose wealth in natural resources makes it the most vulnerable target for man's oldest and deadliest game - War. In the super-mercantile universe of centuries from now, young Captain David Falkayn has earned his command by blazing a trail of brilliant achievements in opening new planets to trade. Yet his very aptitudes in the rough and ready encounters on frontier worlds make him vulnerable to the supersecret machinations of Serendipity, Inc. - a firm offering any information, at the highest available prices. The giant computers of Serendipity inform David of a planet whose untapped natural resources would bring to incredible heights the wealth and power of David's boss, the irascible Nicholas va Rijin and his company Solar Space and Liquor. The highly classified information is coupled with the warning that David's next space trek should be surrounded with maximum security. But even before he can depart on his mission he finds himself the unwilling guest of the founders of Serendipity at their secluded Lunar castle. David soon finds that not only is his life in jeopardy but the existence of his employers as well. On an even more immense scale, the strength of the Polesotechnic Leavue is in peril of disintegration. What could be revealed in an expedition to the rogue planet that could bring such destruction to so many, and so much?"

Original Publication: Doubleday, November 1969
This Edition: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1970
Cover Art: Peter Bromely
Format: Hardback

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Beyond the Beyond

"Beyond the Beyond. Tomorrow - and the day after. When men are scattered like dust between the galaxies.In these six full-length novellas, never before published in book form, Hugo Award-winner Poul Anderson creates all the chilling terror and distant hope of man's last frontier - the vast wilderness between the stars! MEMORY - They peeled his mind from his body and sent him to enslave the planet of his own people...DAY OF BURNING - An interplanetary Mafia is chosen to save a strange civilization from a Supernova...BRAKE - Only one thing could stop the ship at such a speed. But with the Solar System in upheaval, who would try? THE SENSITIVE MAN - A world balances on the brink of a new dawn - or a new Dark Age. And one man can push it either way. THE MOONRAKERS - They were space pirates with dreams of Empire - nomads from the far edge of the system who must be stopped...STARFROG - The ship was trapped in a corner of space so crowded with stars that nothing could penetrate the deadly, glowing fog."

Original Publication: Signet, August 1969
This Edition: Signet, August 1969
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Memory, Brake, Day of Burning, The Sensitive Man, The Moonrakers and Starfog

Review:


A Circus of Hells

"Wayland 100 light-years from home.Ace Lieutenant Dominic Flandry was not a man easily swayed from his duty to the Empire.not, that is, until galactic vice king Leon Ammon offered him a million-credit bribe, a voluptuous woman called Djana, and a chance to explore a dark and treasure-laden moon. Yet within the desolate peaks and valleys of that strange world of ice and shadow, Flandry found more than he had bargained for. Supposedly barren, the planet swarmed with a hideous race of strange, inhuman creatures...infernally controlled by a deranged and brilliant computer brain. Each, like a piece in a bizarre and vicious chess game, was programmed to kill. And although Flandry did not know it - so was the woman he loved."

Original Publication: Signet, May 1970
This Edition: Signet, May 1970
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Part of this novel appeared in Galaxy in August 1969 under the title The White King's War

Review:


The Byworlder

"Skip Wayburn, artist, drifter, sigaroon, gulped down his food with nothing on his mind but a long evening of lovemaking. Far above him, the first emissary from interstellar space continued to orbit the globe. For three years it had been there, and still there were nothing but questions. What had lured the voyager from Sigma Draconis to Earth? How did the creature plan to use its incredible power? And most important, why was it waiting....and for what? Then, in a blinding flash of insight, Skip Wayburn suddenly knew the answers...knew with dead certainty why the Sigman had come, who "he" was, and precisely what the Earthmen must do. But who would listen to the far-out ideas of a mere sigaroon? Skip didn't know. But someone had to listen - and fast."

Original Publication: Signet/ New American Library, September 1971
This Edition: Signet/New American Library, September 1971
Cover Art: Gene Szafran
Format: Paperback

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The Dancer from Atlantis

"Duncan Reid was standing on the deck of an ocean liner in the North Pacific when something suddenly seized him like a whirlwind of black thunders, and before he had a chance to cry out he was taken from the world of the 20th Century. When he regained the conciousness he found himself standing on the rock-strewn ground of a barren land bordering a sea, and he was not alone! Nearby was a yellow-bearded man in a spiked helmet and chain mail; a short, leather-coated rider on a rearing pony; and a tall, slender woman wearing a long white dress. Each seemed as terrified as he was and the presence of a strange, glowing cylinder added to their fear. With no common language between them, they were forced to use signs and gestures to communicate. But that problem was soon overcome when a man stumbled out of the cylinder and collapsed onto the ground. Badly injured, the man carried two helmets with him and he feebly indicated to Duncan to put one of them on. Somehow the helmet enabled Duncan to understand his language and Duncan learned the fantastic story of how they had all come to this place. The man's name was Sahir, a time traveller whose vehicle had raced out of control and swept up Duncan and the others. They had been deposited in a distant past, and Duncan was warned that a monumental natural disaster was about to occur. But before Sahir could tell Duncan how they might return to their own eras, he died. Was there no way back? With the aid of the helmets they learned each other's languages, and Duncan discovered who these strangers were. The bearded man was named Oleg, a medieval Russian; the other man was Uldin, a pre-Attila Hun. But then the origins of the woman were revealed, Duncan was stunned. Her name was Erissa and apparently she had been thrown back only a few decades from her own time. Although she now lived on Crete, once she had lived in another land that had been totally destroyed in a great cataclysm - Atlantis! Did the destruction of Atlantis cause the wreck of the time machine and, more importantly, could the key to their return rest in that country? Hugo Award winner Poul Anderson had written a fascinating, action-paced adventure that takes Duncan Reid and his companions on a perilous journey through the ancient world to reach Atlantis, the most fabled land in all history."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday, 1971
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday, 1971
Cover Art: Frank Frazetta
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Cover illustration by Frank Frazetta, an iconic American comic and cover artist. Frazetta was the subject of a 2003 documentary called Frazetta: Painting with Fire. The Dancer from Atlantis is a time travel story turned historical fiction. Anderson was an avid reader of ancient history and one assumes that the inspiration for this work is derived from this interest.

Review:


The Day the Sun Stood Still

"Faith wasn't enough. Maybe it should have been, but it wasn't. And when acience didn't find any reason to suppose the world was more than atoms and chance, humanity started slipping back into chaos. The world needed a sign - scientific proof, the only sign it could accept - that God lived. Then suddenly, as in biblical times, the sign was there: "....for a day and a night...the earth moved not around the Sun, neither did it rotate." What happened the day the sun stood still? Three outstanding science-fiction authors explore that theme, probing the reaction of modern man when confronted with a miracle, in three entirely different by equally absorbing stories, never before published: A Chapter of Revelation by Poul Anderson; Thomas the Proclaimer by Robert Silverberg; and Things Which are Caesar's by Gordon R. Dickson. In doing so, they answer the question posed by science-fiction master Lester del Rey in his foreward: What kind of world might exist where the basis of faith is replaced by certain knowledge?"

Original Publication: Thomas Nelson/Science Fiction Book Club, November 1972
This Edition: Thomas Nelson/Science Fiction Book Club, November 1972
Cover Art: Karl Wurzer
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: A Chapter of Revelation by Poul Anderson, Thomas the Proclaimer by Robert Silverberg and Things Which are Caesar's by Gordon R. Dickson

Review:


The Day of Their Return

"The future holds much in store for the planet Aeneas. Inhabited for over four hundred years by Earth colonists, hostile nomads and strange winged creatures, Aeneas stands at the outpost of the Terran Empire - a solitary orb of intrigue, mystery and political unrest at the edge of the galaxy. And only one man, Ivar Frederiksen, holds the key to planetary peace or a violent war that could easily destroy the Universe. For months, Ivar, the proud on of an Aenean nobleman, tried in vain to change the oppressive way the Terrans governed his home planet - first through talk and then with violence. Ivar and his stern group of revolutionaries had twice stormed the capital city - only to be severely defeated on both occasions by the concentrated power of the galactic Empire. Forced to temporarily abandon his quest and flee for his life, Ivar left everything behind, including the girl he loved, to travel with a strange band of gypsies. While living a gay and boisterous life in the Aenean deserts, he heard tales of god-like brain beings called The Elders - an ancient race of supermen whom legend proclaimed the saviors of the universe. They were benevolent creatures that had long ago moved on to a higher mental plane with the promise to return one day to visit and help their "children." There was even talk that a magical prophet had already arrived on Aeneas to proclaim the second coming. Ivar thought the stories to be pure fantasy, but after seeing for himself the magnificent structures The Elders had left behind, he made up his mind to find the prophet and enlist his aid in fighting the Empire. With the help of Erannath, a wing-man with reasons of his own for finding the seer, Ivar set his sights on the city of Orcus - where he encountered the man they called the Savior of Aeneas. But was the prophet sincere? Were his words of wisdom salted with lies and deception? Were The Elders merely returning to visit the galaxy....or reconquer it? Many questions ran through Ivar's mind as he uncovered startling secrets far more sinister than the Aeneans or even the Terran Empire could imagine. The Elders were a race that could as easily annihilate the galaxy as befriend it...and only Ivar's sharp wits and muscles of steel would determine the climactic outcome."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, February 1974
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, February 1974
Cover Art: Richard V. Corben
Format: Hardback

Notes:

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The People of the Wind

"Terra + Ythri + Avalon = Universal War! The Terran Empire: Behemoth, reaching ever further across the star systems, seeking to suck the entire universe into its gigantic maw. In its favor it must be said that the Empire offers peace and prosperity to its subjects. The Ythrian Domain: medium-size empire with room to grow...except where its borders meet those of the Terran Empire! Peopled by the Ythri, birdlike beings with a culture and intellect that is easily a match for the Terran way of life. Avalon: Colony planet of Ythri but inhabited by human and Ythri alike, Avalon is the Domain's secret weapon - or is it? For Avalon has formed a culture all its own, which it will defend against all comers. And Avalon seems quite capable of defying the combined might of two of the most powerful empires in the universe!"

Original Publication: New American Library, 1973
This Edition: Signet, May 1973
Cover Art: Fernando Fernandez
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Nominated for the Hugo and the Nebula Awards, The People of the Wind is a sparse novel filled with a veritable legion of characters. It has been theorized that it serves as allegory for the Israel-Palestine conflict, which was a political concern of Anderson's. Also theorized is that the storyline represents the just-passed American Civil Rights movement. In the novel Anderson writes "The biracial culture they're creating. Or that's creating itself; you can't plan or direct a new current in history. I wonder if that wasn't the source of their resistance like an alloy or a two-phase material, many times stronger than either part that went into it." This novel is part of the Terran Empire series and should properly be read after The Earth Book of Stormgate.

Review:


Brain Wave

Original Publication: Ballantine, June 1954
This Edition: Ballantine, January 1974
Cover Art: Phil Kirkland
Format: Paperback

Notes:

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A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows

"The Terran Empire was crumbling - and it required the remarkable talents of Sir Dominic Flandry, bon vivant and universal troubleshooter, to put the pieces back together. A hint of trouble and the purchase of an aristocratic slave girl send Flandry on a quick flight to Diomedes aboard his well-equipped spacer, Hooligan. As he suspected, there was a deadly plan for galaxy-wide insurrection and civil war that could blast the tottering Empire into its componet planets. Time was running out, and only Dominic Flandry, half a universe away, had the knowledge to prevent an explosion which could spark the beginning of the end for Terran civilization..."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, May 1975
This Edition: Signet/New American Library, November 1987
Cover Art: Tim Hildebrandt
Format: Paperback

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Fire Time

"Uncivil War.Every thousand years Fire Time came to Ishtar.a time when the giant red sun Anu approached, scorching the planet and driving the barbarian hordes from the north. For once Larreka, commander of the Legions of the Gathering in the south, hoped that the Tassui might be driven back. Perhaps this time Ishtar's civilization would survive the barbaric onslaught. But a warlord had arisen among the invaders - and under Arnanak, the Tassui were relentlessly sweeping south...bringing even more destruction than the death-dealing rays of the Demon SUn. Suddenly the men of Earth, stationed in Ishtar, found themselves torn between the two warring factions...."

Original Publication: Doubleday, November 1974
This Edition: Ballantine, November 1975
Cover Art: Darrell Sweet
Format: Paperback

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The Day the Sun Stood Still

"The time had come when people needed proof that God does exist. Faith wasn't enough. Maybe it should have been, but it wasn't. And when science couldn't find any reason to suppose that the world was more than atoms and chance, humanity started slipping into chaos. The world needed a sign - scientific proof, the only sign it could accept - that God lives. Then suddenly, as in biblical times, the sign was there: And for a day and a night the earth moves not around the sun, neither did it rotate. And the laws of momentum were confounded. Then Earth again took up its appointed course. And nothing otherwise was changed. Except, of course, some of the ways of man."

Original Publication: Dutton, July 1972
This Edition: Dell, 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Anthology featuring three novellas: A Chapter of Revelation by Poul Anderson, Thomas the Proclaimer by Robert Silverberg and Things Which are Caesar's by Gordon Dickson.

Review:


The High Crusade

"In the year 1345 A.D. (By Earth Reckoning)..the mighty Wersgorix, undisputed rulers of outer space, landed on Earth in their quest for new worlds to conquer. Their ship carried guided missiles and thermonuclear devices, but they had long since forgotten how to use the weapons necessary for hand-to-hand fighting. So they were easy prey for a band of knights armed with battleaxes and broadswords. But it was a victory won by surprise, and only temporary. The invaders were thousands of years ahead of Earth in technical knowledge - and knew countless ways of blowing up the whole planet."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1960
This Edition: Manor, 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

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A Midsummer Tempest

"Suppose every event in history had at least two causes. And led to and from a separate universe in space and time. Then there would be an infinity of alternate worlds. Imagine a world in which every word written by Shakespeare was literally true. A world in which Prince Rupert of the Rhine could fight for Charles I of England and escape the Puritans by hopping a railroad locomotive, on the right track but 200 years before its time. A world in which ageing Caliban could pace the lonely shore, yearning for the return of his lost love, Miranda. And where all these universes, and more, intersected, there lay a tavern where infinite possibilities met - if only for a night!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, March 1974
This Edition: Ballantine, March 1975
Cover Art: Darrell Sweet
Format: Paperback

Notes:

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The Winter of the World

"A corpse in Arvanneth was nothing except food for stray dogs. That's why adventurer Josserek Derrain was so cautious as he slipped across the city's limits under cover of darkness. By now even the lowliest guard in the Southern Empire was looking to slit his throat for the reward. Josserek's intention was to see that no one ever collected that money. As he moved quickly onward looking for shelter, the wary traveler saw a naked child at play in the street. The boy was rolling a human skull around for sport. How Arvanneth had changed since the days of its great glory - before the Ice came! Those were the times - many thousands of years past - when men could fly, when myth says they went to the moon and beyond, and this city, under whatever name, stood as a shining monument to a long-forgotten civilization. But now the time for reveries was over...some menacing words had just cut the still air. "Stand quiet," said a gruff voice - a voice not of the Empire. Donya of Hervar surveyed the captive with keen interest. He was quite unlike the other male specimens she'd seen in Arvanneth. This was someone to reckon with - a man with strong, challenging features similar to members of her own tribe, the Rogaviki, who roamed the North on the edge of the retreating ice caps. A proud and peaceful race, the Rogaviki hated and feared only one thing: invasion of their beloved hunting grounds. And this fear would shortly become a reality if the Empire moved ahead with its plans to invade and assimilate the Northern territories - slaughtering both animals and people as they advanced. Donya knew that her tribe might soon have to fight for their survival. And if anyone could organize the Rogaviki into a defending army, this man called Josserek was the one who might do it! And so begins one of the most compelling science fiction adventures of the decade. Poul Anderson, the celebrated author of A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows, Fire Time and The Day of Their Return, has created a spell-binding novel of Earth's far future. It is a world where the beautiful Donya and courageous Josserek brave countless perils - including their stormy love for each other - to save the Rogaviki from extinction."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, January 1976
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, January 1976
Cover Art: Larry Kresek
Format: Hardback

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War of the Wing-Men

"When three Terrans - a space pilot, a planetary queen and an obese tycoon - crash landed on Diomedes, they realized that the chances for survival were quite slim. The native food was totally poisonous to humans, and the survivors had only six weeks worth of supplies to get them across thousands of miles of unmapped territory to the one Terran outpost. Their only hope was to enlist the aid of the winged inhabitants of Diomedes, and these barbarian tribes cared only for battle and glory. There was little that could induce them to worry about the lives of three humans..."

Original Publication: Ace Double, August 1958
This Edition: Ace, August 1976
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Mirkheim

"A Star Explodes and a billion years later, a galaxy explodes in war. When the heavy metal ruin of Mirkheim is discovered at the edge of Known Space, the gigantic planet becomes the center of a war that is fought in all the far reaches of Earth's dazzling and corrupt empire. This epic adventure of the end of a thousand-year civilization sweeps from hyperspace skirmishes in the radio glare of dark suns, to the bloody deals in the corridors of Earth itself, where the stars are traded like coins."

Original Publication: Berkley/Putnam, 1977
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, December 1977
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This novel features two of Anderson's series characters, Nicholas van Rijn and David Falkayne, and is part of the Technic Civilization. It is also the last book to contain these characters. Anderson's libertarian political views shine though in this story. Like the other instalments in this series, it should be read in proper order or the effect of what Anderson has built is shamefully lost.

Review:


Satan's World

"A Rogue Planet frozen for a billion years by the cold of interstellar space, now boiling with titanic energies. Mysterious beings had kidnapped David Falkhayn, the celebrated explorer of new worlds. Why were they trying to prevent him, at all costs, from exploiting the devil planet's resources? The stakes are nothing less than the survival of the human race, and the sentient beings allied with it."

Original Publication: Doubleday, November 1969
This Edition: Berkley, April 1977
Cover Art: Rick Sternbach
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This instalment of the van Rijn/Falkayn series introduces the female character Chee Lan. Even though the book contains some marked sexism, which was not unusual for the time, Lan is a strong character who plays an important role in the plot's development.

Review:


The Earth Book of Stormgate

"Central to the work of Poul Anderson is his great future history series, The History of the Polesotechnic League, featuring two of his most famous characters - the wily trader, Nicholas van Rijn, and the explorer, David Falkayn. Anderson's stories and novels of the League have grown and coalesced into one of the major works of contemporary SF. Now, in The Earth Book of Stormgate, the final twelve stories are collected to complete the series' five volumes - The Trouble Twisters, Trader to the Stars, Satan's World, Mirkheim and The Earth Book of Stormgate (which includes the complete text of the novel The Man Who Counts). The present volume brings together these stories, which span four thousand years of future history, and sets them in the context of the whole series, with a detailed chart that incorporates many of Anderson's later works in one enormous schema. These twelve adventures chronicle the expansion of earthmen out into the inhabited galaxy, meetings with alien races, the growth and decay of the first interstellar government (a trading association governed by trader-adventurers), followed by the foundation of the first interstellar empire. The theme that links the stories in this volume is the relations of humans with the great winged race, the Ythri. These tales of humanity, kept in the Ythri repository at Stormgate, are culminating achievement in one of the great sagas of modern science fiction. "...behold these annals from the Discovery and on through the World-Taking. They are garnered from different trees, and few of them will seem at once to grow toward the same sun. Yet they do, they all do. This is the tale, told afresh, of how Avalon came to settlement and thus our cloth to being. This is the tale as told...by Terrans, who walk the earth. Then read."

Original Publication: Berkley/Putnam, June 1978
This Edition: Berkley/Putnam, June 1978
Cover Art: Tony Roberts
Format: Hardback

Notes:

A collection of stories from the Polesotechnic League series, this anthology contains:Wings of Victory, The Problem of Pain, How to be Ethnic in One Easy Lesson, Margin of Profit, Esau, The Season of Forgiveness, The Man Who Counts, A Little Knowledge, Day of Burning, Lodestar, Wingless, and Rescue on Avalon. The Earth Book of Stormgate was nominated for a Locus Award in 1979.

Review:


The Long Way Home

"You can't go home again.For home is not merely a place, but a situation - and when that situation changes, home is no more. Captain Langely of the experimental starship Explorer was to learn this truth in an especially bitter way. Poul Anderson has again written a fast-paced science fiction adventure laced with that special blend of socio-historical speculation that has become his trademark. "

Original Publication: Panther, December 1975
This Edition: Ace, February 1978
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Originally published as No World of Their Own

Review:


The Man Who Counts

"Interstellar Merchant Prince one moment, barbarian chattel the next. Marooned half a world and an ocean away from the sole human outpost on a planet whose very water is poisonous to humans; captured by winged barbarians in the midst of a brutal war of extermination, somehow "Old Nick" must scheme, conspire, wrangle and battle his way to survival. How, with the aid of his two companions, he does so is the story of - The Man Who Counts."

Original Publication: Ace, February 1978
This Edition: Ace, February 1978
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Variant title of War of the Wing-Men

Review:


The Night Face

"The two faces of Gwydion. To the men of the starship Quetzal their task seemed routine: to establish diplomatic relations and enter into trade negotiations with the people of a newly discovered planet. Since to all appearances of the folk of Gwydion were the most thoroughly amiable in all the galaxy - words for such concepts as war, theft, anger, murder and jealousy did not even exist in their language - there could hardly be a problem. But as the season changed on Gwydion so did the people..."

Original Publication: Ace, February 1978
This Edition: Ace, February 1978
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

A shorter version of this work was released in 1960 titled A Twelvemonth and a Day, and in 1963 this story was released as Let the Spacemen Beware!. The Night Face can be found in the collection Flandry's Legacy released in 2011 and also The Night Face and Other Stories, 1978.

Review:

Many people regard The Night Face one of Poul Anderson's weaker novels because the ending is rather predictable. I thought it was a wonderful little piece of work. The book is short and extremely poignant. While it doesn't have a complete ending that wraps up every potential question, the ending is beautifully done and crushingly sad.

The spaceship Quetzal is headed to a planet called Gwyndion to establish relations with the population and to discuss the building of a base. Main characters Tolteca and Raven are captain and military leader respectively and hail from different planets. Tolteca is from Namerica, a mercantile planet and Raven is from Lochlanna, a military planet. Neither have had any experience with the people of Gwyndion and are very curious.

Upon landing, Tolteca and Raven discover a planet populated with people who speak in myths and legends and who are impossibly even tempered. They believe that they, and all other living things on Gwyndion are "one with God" and celebrate this oneness on a periodic basis in a place called the Holy City. They have a low population, only 10 million on the entire planet, and every individual stops whatever task they are occupied with at the time of the celebration and head to designated Holy Cities around the planet.

Tolteca and Raven wish to understand the nature of these people. The natives' houses are veritable fortresses with metal shutters for every window and heavy metal doors. They do not discuss or apparently even think of unpleasant things. They have advanced science, but strong negative reactions when atomic energy is mentioned. And strangely in preparation for the festival, they house everything important or dangerous in locked down facilities with timers so that nothing can be damaged until after, even though there are no other intelligent creatures on Gwyndion. Noone will discuss what happens in the Holy City; it is as if they do not remember.

I do not wish to give away the ending of the story, but it is a great one and while I had some understanding of what was to occur before I reached the end, I did not anticipate the exact nature of it. I was pleasantly surprised by Anderson's vision. I own the 1978 Ace paperback version of this novel and in the back of it is an essay discussing the work by Sandra Miesel, whom Anderson considered the foremost authority on his works. It was an enlightening piece but I do not think it exists in other pressings of The Night Face. I urge those who read this novel to seek out the analysis given by Miesel because it makes evidence that while this may not be Anderson's best writing, it is a very good piece with much depth.

Time and Stars

"Deep Space and High time - TURNING POINT: That morning they invented the wheel; in the afternoon, the sailing ship; now night was falling and they looked up to the beckoning stars.EPILOGE: Mankind and Earth meet again, at the Billion-year Reunion.NO TRUCE WITH KINGS: The Hugo Award-winning novella of a feudal America at war...Always named among the handful of greats in the field of SF, Poul Anderson has expanded both his own reputation and the horizons of the art in this latest collection of stories from the pinnacle of the imagination.

Original Publication: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, April 1964
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, January 1978
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: No Truce With Kings, Turning Point, Escape from Orbit, Epilogue, The Critique of Impure Reason and Eve Times Four all by Poul Anderson.

Review:


Ensign Flandry

"Introducing Dominic Flandry. Before he's through he'll have saved worlds and become the confidante of emperors. But for now he's seventeen years old, as fresh and brash a sprig of the nobility as you would care to know. The only thing as damp as the place behind his ears is the ink on his brand new commission. Though through this and his succeeding adventures he will struggle gloriously and win (usually) mighty victories, Dominic Flandry is essentially a tragic figure: a man who knows too much, who knows that battle, scheme and even betray as he will, in the end it will mean nothing. For with the relentlessness of physical law the Long Night approaches. The Terran Empire is dying..."

Original Publication: Chilton, 1966
This Edition: Ace, February 1979
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Merman's Children

"In The Merman's Children, set against the medieval tableau of Europe and the mustering forces of Christendom, Poul Anderson, the world's most honored author of fantasy and science fiction, has written his biggest and most ambitious novel ever. For many years Anderson had wanted to write one great fantasy: the story of how the last age of Faery passed and of how the fairy folk gave way before the inevitable spread of Christendom. The Merman's Children is that book - the tragic chronicle of how the scattered remnants of Faery lived and scrambled to survive in the last days of Magic. During the waning days of the thirteenth century, in a climate of superstition, greed and curious excitement, WEstern Europe embarked on a great new age of expansion and discovery - a renaissance had begun, a rebirth fostered and urged by the powerful Church. The Merman's Children is the story of one family of mer-folk cast adrift in a world that had no more need of them. It chronicles the adventures of seven mer-children who return to their underwater city to find it shattered, exorcised and their family and friends departed. The story of how they sneek their kind across the western sea in Iceland and Vinland, of their travels down the coast of Europe and through the straits of Gibralter is buoyant with magic, epic in its tragedy. All the elements are here: Faeries, superstitious villiagers, lost treasure, Holy Crusaders, battle, piracy, beautiful women, brave heroes,, and magic. The Merman's Children is immensely satisfying epic fantasy. Poul Anderson is one of the great names of contemporary science fiction, author of over fifty books and two hundred shorter pieces, winner of five Hugo Awards and two Nebula Awards for short fiction. His classic SF novels include Brian Wave, The High Crusade, Tau Zero, The Enemy Stars, The Earth Book of Stormgate and The Avatar. He and his wife, Karen, live in Orinda, California, and are both active in the Society for Creative Anachronism, in which Poul has won a knighthood for prowess in medieval combat."

Original Publication: Berkley/Putman, September 1979
This Edition: Berkley/Putnam, September 1979
Cover Art: Jose Cruz
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


Agent of the Terran Empire

"'It pleased Ruethen of the Long Hand to give a feast and ball at the Crystal Moon for his enemies. He knew they must come. Pride of race had slipped from Terra, while the need to appear well-bred and sophisticated had waxed correspondingly. The fact that spaceships prowled and fought, fifty light-years beyond Antares, made it all the more impossible a gaucherie to refuse an invitation from the Merseian representative. Besides, one could feel delightfully wicked and ever so delicately in danger..." It is the common fate of empires to grown old and jaded: Rome, Byzantium, Britain, America, and so on to the Empire of Terra itself, each has near the end succumbed to the same weary "sophistication" that allows a warlord of Merseia to make mock of a race whose star-conquering ancestors found the Merseians a race of pretechnic barbarians huddled in stone piles - and saved them from extinction. Flandry himself has come to understand that there is no more point to all his victories than that a few trillion of his fellow creatures may live out their lives before the coming of the Long Night of galactic barbarism. That he will not have shortened that coming Dark Age one bit - only postponed it. That the barbarians always win in the end, and are always followed by a new round of civilization...'"

Original Publication: Chilton, 1965
This Edition: Ace, January 1980
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Demon of Scattery

"In the vessel that sails on a timeless sea, a God sings of human mortality.hear then of a time when the Lochlannack first came a viking into Eire, of a time when the gentle Christos was new - come to the land and an alder magic flickered still - and once in a great while, under just the right conditions and with a very special curse, might flare up into full life again."

Original Publication: Ace, December 1979
This Edition: Ace, June 1980
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Interior artwork by Alicia Austin. Collaboration with Mildred Downey Broxon. Also included Historical Notes - The Irish by Mildred Downey Broxon and The Norse by Poul Anderson.

Review:


The Psychotechnic League

"In the beginning was World War III.Out of the flames was born a new civilization, a new humanity dedicated to one world rather than to many nations, to one peace rather than many wars. Never again on Planet Earth would one group of humans "defend" themselves against another group equally convinced that all their actions were "defensive." Never again on Planet Earth. But cycles repeat themselves endlessly; Earth is only the beginning of the human story. Next comes planet against planet, and then stars themselves. Through it all the impersonal forces of historical necessity will tend to force that story into the pathways of tyranny, stasis, and war. And in the end they must prevail. But ever will humankind win free once more...The Psychotechnic League. "

Original Publication: Tor/Pinnacle, June 1981
This Edition: Tor/Pinnacle, June 1981
Cover Art: Vincent DiFate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Forward by Sandra Miesel, Marius, Un-Man, The Sensitive Man and The Big Rain by Poul Anderson

Review:


Explorations

"Welcome to the Universe. Guided by one of science fiction's most profound and adventurous intellects, you are about to go places that you would never have believed could exist, and think thoughts you never would have conceived. This is it. No holds barred."

Original Publication: Tor, November 1981
This Edition: Tor, November 1981
Cover Art: Vincent Di Fate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Saturn Game, The Bitter Bread, The Ways of Love, The Voortrekkers, Epilogue and Starfog all by Poul Anderson

Review:


The Trouble Twisters

"David Falkayn - Few indeed had won their Master Merchant's certificate as young as he, let alone become confidential associates of an uncrowned prince like Nicholas van Rijn, or ruled entire planets. But with an alien posse riding hot on his heels, even Falkayn can't feel completely at ease...The Trouble Twisters...In his magnificent Future History of mankind's second great age, Poul Anderson has conjured up a universe too immense for even the human race to despoil. Across this grand expanse of space roams the Polesotechnic League, a band of merchant princes from every inhabited planet, in search of adventure and riches beyond the wildest dreams of our earthbound time!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1966
This Edition: Berkley, May 1980
Cover Art: David Egge
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Conflict

"Angels Above, Devils Below.Since the first human stood upright the stars have been a source of wonderment and inspiration. All our heavens have been placed in the heavens, our hells in the depths of earth. Angels above, devils below. Mankind between. But perhaps heaven isn't so heavenly. Perhaps those who live there are as self-interested and violence-prone as any earthbound mortal. And even if they're not, we will be there soon. Cause enough for Conflict!"

Original Publication: Tor, August 1983
This Edition: Tor, August 1983
Cover Art: Kevin Eugene Johnson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This is a collection of short stories written between 1956 and 1973. It includes: Time Lag, High Treason, The Alien Enemy, The Puglist, I Tell You, Its True, Kings Who Die, A Man to My Wounding, Among Thieves, Details and The Turning Point.

Review:


Orion Shall Rise

"Poul Anderson is indisputable one of the most important figures in modern science fiction. He has been writing both fantasy and science fiction for more than thirty years and has won seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards. Brain Wave, The Broken Sword, Three Hearts and Three Lions, Tau Zero, A Midsummer Tempest and The High Crusade are rightly regarded as classics in the field. He belongs in the company of Heinlein, Clarke, Asimov and Herbert and his latest novel, Orion Shall Rise, is his most ambitious book yet. Epic in scope and human in detail, Orion Shall Rise is a grand saga of future humanity struggling back from near-ruin after a planet-wide nuclear war. The survivors face a life-threatening limitation of resources as they strive to rise once again to great heights of civilization. Orion Shall Rise has a cast of countries: The Domain, dominated by Skyhold - a giant platform floating thirty miles above Europe, savior during destruction but now maintaining a reactionary and repressively stratified society; Northwest Union, a loose-knit network of Scandinavian-style lodges founded by survivors in the Pacific Northwest of North America; the Maurai Federation, descendants of Maori natives from New Zealand who pursue a policy of developing technology to use the natural energy of wind, sun and sea; the many tribes and countries on the Mong who fled Asia over an ice bridge and settled in the middle of North America. Already wars are being fought again, most recently between the Norrmen of the Union, who wish to revive a benign form of nuclear technology and the Maurai, who are unalterably opposed to its use. There is a cast of characters throughout: Talence lern Ferlay, a noble son of Skyholm who loses his home through treachery; Ronica Birken, Survivor and master of the Northwestern wilderness; Terai Lohannaso, sailor, trader and intelligence man of the Maurai. These and dozens of others - spies, peasants, librarians, minstrels, heroes and villains - show us a complex and strange world as adventure follows adventure until a searing confrontation brings the remnants of mankind once more to the edge of destruction - or the fragile chance for a new life for the race."

Original Publication: Timescape, March 1983
This Edition: Timescape, March 1983
Cover Art: Attila Hejja
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Hoka

"The inhabitants of the planet Toka are..1)The joint creation of two of science fiction's greatest masters, 2) The galaxy's most lovable aliens 3) The galaxy's only race of sentient teddy bears 4) Such enthusiastic admirers of earthpeople that they adopt various Terran cultures in every detail - but with a little confusion about the difference between fact and fiction, 5) All the above. Hoka...will leave you breathless! *(answer #5 is correct)"

Original Publication: Wallaby/Simon & Schuster, October 1983
This Edition: Tor, June 1984
Cover Art: Walker Brothers and Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Joy in Mudville Interior artwork by Victoria Poyser, Undiplomatic Immunity Interior artwork by Nicola Cuti, Full Pack (Hokas Wild) Interior artwork by Lela Dowling, The Napoleon Crime Interior artwork by Phil Foglio, Prologue (Hoka!), Joy in Mudville, Undiplomatic Immunity, Full Pack (Hokas Wild), The Napoleon Crime by Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson, Afterword (Hokas!) by Sandra Miesel

Review:


Orbit Unlimited

"The colonists' ships sped toward the far star - they were free at last from the tyrannical government that had oppressed them from birth. Then came the message from Earth - "Return at once - new government - guarantee your freedon - at home!" Was this a reprieve from death - for the perilous ordeal of colonizing an unknown planet would cost many lives - or a trick? There were only hours to decide - for it was almost too late to turn back...In Orbit UNilmited, Poul Anderson writes a stirring and fascinating adventure of tomorrow."

Original Publication: Pyramid, May 1961
This Edition: Ace, July 1984
Cover Art: Alan Gutierrez
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Seven Conquests

"The ancient sport of war Every new capability that man gains is - sooner rather than later - turned against his enemies. No government thus far has established a protection against war except the ability to fight one. Its abolition is a work that only warriors may accomplish. And in that great battle, imagination may be our strongest ally."

Original Publication: Macmillan, March 1969
This Edition: Baen, October 1984
Cover Art: Vincent DiFate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Seven Conquests is a collection of short stories and novellas written from 1957 to 1964. They were all previously published in magazines, mostly Worlds of If and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. The story Strange Bedfellows was named To Build a World when it appeared in Galaxy. The collection includes: Kings Who Die, Wildcat, Cold Victory, Inside Straight, Details, License and Strange Bedfellows. The Panther 1981 edition of this anthology is simply named Conquests.

Review:


Berserker Base

"The berserkers are sentient machines that roam the galaxy. Their mission: to destroy organic life wherever they find it. Planet after planet has fallen to them, but in the heart of a berserker fortress, one human, Lars Kankuru, finds reason to hope. Forced into telepathic link with fellow prisoners, the nonhuman Carmpan, Lars beholds visions of berserker-human conflict - from an encounter with the crew of a generation ship who must choose between saving their precious cargo and luring the enemy away from their unsuspecting world...to an unexpected alliance between humans and aliens, who together stalk the spaceways after deadly game...to a computer program with a human personality and a secret weapon all its own. In this exciting volume, Fred Saberhagen is joined by six other eminent SF authors - Poul Anderson, Edward Bryant, Stephen R. Donaldson, Larry Niven, Connie Wilils and Roger Zelazny - in creating a new segment of the Berserker saga."

Original Publication: Tor, March 1985
This Edition: Tor, March 1985
Cover Art: Boris Vallejo
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Prisoner's Base by Fred Saberhagen, What Makes Us Human by Stephen R. Donaldson, Friends Together by Fred Saberhagen, With Friends Like These by Connie Willis, The Founts of Sorrow by Fred Saberhagan, Itself Surprised by Roger Zelazny, The Great Secret by Fred Saberhagan, Deathwomb by Poul Anderson, Dangerous Dreams by Fred Saberhagen, Pilots of Twilight by Edward Bryant, Crossing the Bar by Fred Saberhagen, A Teardrop Falls by Larry Niven and Berserker Base by Fred Saberhagen

Review:


The Game of Empire

"Seventeen-year-old Diana Crowfeather has never met her celebrated father, Admiral Sir Diminic Flandry, diplomat and spy extraordinaire. But she has inherited his longing for adventure, his courage and his quick intelligence. And through Diana, living by her wits on the fringe planet Imhotep, has long since proved her personal resourcefulness and ability to survive, she is about to be tested as a recruit in the deadly struggle between the alien Merseian Empire and the forces of Terra. Together with the Tigery secret agent Targovi and the pacifist Wodenite dragon Axor, Diana journeys to the world of Daedalus - ostensibly seeking ancient ruins...in reality investigating rumors of an impending rebellion against Earth. There on Daedalus, on a beautiful and mysterious island called Zacharia, the trio discover an incredible secret that could very well change the balance of interstellar power...forever. Topflight space adventure from the celebrated author of Orion Shall Rise."

Original Publication: Baen, May 1985
This Edition: Baen/Science Fiction Book Club, October 1985
Cover Art: Thomas Kidd
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


Time Wars

"How would ancient Vikings react to a gun-wielding giant with flaming red hair? What would a modern cop do in a feudal world where gunpowder was considered a benediction of God? What ic Scipio Africanus never lived to a challenge, or kill, Hannibal at Zama? The probabilities are endless, an infinite number of ways to replay the same scene, over and over again. War transmuted to its highest magnitude, ripping through the very fabric of time."

Original Publication: Tor, November 1986
This Edition: Tor, November 1986
Cover Art: John Pound
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Editing collaboration with Charles G. Waugh and Martin H. Greenberg. Contents: Frost and Thunder by Randall Garrett, Gunpowder God by H. Beam Piper, Amphiskios by John D. MacDonald, Delenda Est by Poul Anderson, Dragonrider by Anne McCaffrey, The Timesweepers by Keith Laumer, Run From the Fire by Harry Harrison and Skirmish on a Summer Morning by Bob Shaw

Review:


The Enemy Stars

"Adventure science fiction from a master. The time is the 23rd century, and ships are crawling outward from Earth into the interstellar depths. It will take them centuries to reach even the nearest stars - but once they do, future travel will be instantaneous, because the ships carry matter transmitters that are not subject to the limitations of lightspeed. In the meantime, crews can flit back and forth between the ships and Earth, but until now their only purpose has been to stand watch. Until now. At last one ship has made contact with the stars."

Original Publication: Lippencott, December 1958
This Edition: Baen, July 1987
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The King of Ys: Volume One

"It was midnight when the nine queens set forth from the House of the Goddess. The moon was nearly full and cold east wind whistled across the sacred isle - the sort of wind that rode with the souls of the dead. When they reached the Stones, two of the Sisters helped Forsquilis to a place between the rough-hewn pilliars. The others formed a circle. "Ishtar-Isis-Belisama have mercy on us," aged Quinipilis called out. "Taranis, embolden us. Lir, harden us. All Gods else, we invoke You in the name of the Three, and cry unto you for the deliverance of Ys." Then Quinipilis turned to the priestess between the Stones: "Forsquilis...how go you, what find you?" "I go as an owl," the seeress answered, deep in trance. But she was puzzled, for below her there was only an ordinary soldiers' camp. Then she saw him - the man summoned by the Nine...the Roman who might defeat the despised King Colconor and become th enext King od Ys...Gaius Valerius Gratillonius had never been an ambitious man. Yet Maximus, Duke of the Britons, had sent him to Armorica - the mysterious city of Ys - to keep western Gallia loyal, or at least neutral, while the Duke made his bid for the purple. Should Maximus become an Emperor, the centurion would be in an excellent position for advancement. Gratillonius knew precious little about Ys, but he had heard many odd tales - that the city was ruled by Nine Witch-queens...that the gods of Ys had made their city invincible. As Ys had grown increasingly remote over the centuries, the stories had become even more strange. But for Gratillonius, whose fate was now tied to that of the fabled city, the truth was stranger still...Romans would have called him a barbarian, but Niall maqq Echach was a king in his own right - a man of vision who inspired his people in the face of hopelessness. He had no quarrel with Ys, or so he though. But when the Ysan witches conjured a storn that all but destroyed his fleet, Niall called upon his own gods to curse Ys - and so, irrevocably, bound his own destiny to that of the witches' city and its newest King..."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1988
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1988
Cover Art: Edwin Herder
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Karen Anderson.

Review:


A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows

"The Terran Empire was crumbling - and it required the remarkable talents of Sir Dominic Flandry, bon vivant and universal troubleshooter, to put the pieces back together. A hint of trouble and the purchase of an aristocratic slave girl send Flandry on a quick flight to Diomedes aboard his well-equipped spacer, Hooligan. As he suspected, there was a deadly plan for galaxy-wide insurrection and civil war that could blast the tottering Empire into its component planets. Time was running out, and only Dominic Flandry, half a universe away, had the knowledge to prevent an explosion which could spark the beginning of the end for Terran civilization... "

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, May 1975
This Edition: Signet, November 1987
Cover Art: Tim Hildebrandt
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Boat of a Million Years

"The master of science fiction returns with his greatest work yet: Poul Anderson The Boat of a Million Years"

Original Publication: Tor, November 1989
This Edition: Tor, January 1991
Cover Art: Vincent Di Fate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This novel was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1989, as well as The Hugo Award for Best Novel and the Prometheus Award in 1990. It was also named a New York Times Notable Book, something that's unusual for a science fiction novel. Chapter three was originally published in Analog in 1988.

Review:

The Shield of Time

"Manse Everard is a man with a mission. As an Unattached Agent of the Time Patrol, he's to go anyplace - and anytime! - where humanity's transcendent future is threatened by the alteration of the past. This is Manse's profession, and his burden: for how much suffering, throughout human history, can he bear to "preserve"? Wanda Tamberley is a Patrol member in search of her mission. Recruited from sunny California in the late 20th century, she'd rather serve as a scientist in the research branch, exploring Earth's flora and fauna in epochs long past. But as hints accumulate from the Patrol's mysterious leaders uptime, it's beginning to look as if a lot of human history depends on her personal decisions - and Manse's. Meanwhile, the Exaltationists are on the loose, determined to revise human history and rule Time forever...and Manse Everard is sworn to stop them, no matter what the heartbreaking cost!"

Original Publication: Tor, September 1990
This Edition: Tor, July 1991
Cover Art: Vincent Di Fate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:

I read The Shield of Time by Poul Anderson. In it we meet Manse Everard and Wanda Tamberly. Manse is a veteran time patrol agent, having spent years of life span guarding and correcting the flow of time. Wanda is a new recruit designated a naturalist and trained to study the environment and wildlife present in many periods of history. She was not trained as a full field agent. Together Manse and Wanda must correct a change in the timeline that has eliminated the Time Patrol completely! The entire future as they know it is at stake.

This novel is filled with historical information, interspersed with speculation about what history would be had critical events been changed. Anderson goes to great lengths to detail historical events and situations; it must have required vast amounts of research to be accurate. We are taken from the Pleistocene Age to the Mid-12th century to the 1980s, learning a little about the culture and development at each age. We are confronted with the difficulties that time patrol agents must be faced with reigning in their emotions and constraining themselves from changing history when visiting the past.

For those who know something about medieval history or are interested in extreme detail, this is a great book. For me, it dragged. I enjoyed parts of it - the explanations of the time travel, the descriptions of the Daniellians, etc. I found the details of the history tedious and detracting from the story. In my opinion it was simply too much and went on for too long. I understand that for Anderson and many of his fans, the details were the point, for me, it was monotonous. I was relieved when I finished reading the novel.

Harvest of Stars

"Winner of seven Hugo and three Nebula Awards, Poul Anderson is one of a science fiction's supreme masters. In Harvest of Stars his most ambitious novel to date, Earth lies crushed in the grip of totalitarianism. To save her planet, his heroine, Kyra Davis is sent on a mission to liberate our last bastion of freedom and rescue its legendary leader. her bold adventure will sweep her from Earth's rebel enclaves to the decadent court of an exotic lunar colony, from the virtual realities of biotech and artificial intelligence to a brave new world menaced by a dying star."

Original Publication: Tor, August 1993
This Edition: Tor, July 1994
Cover Art: Vincent Di Fate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:

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