Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov was born (officially) January 2, 1920 in the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. He does not know the exact date of his birth as he was born right after the Russian Revolution. At this time Russians were using the Julian calendar and his family was using the Jewish calendar. He states that his exact date of birth is just impossible to get straightened out. His family immigrated to the United States when he was three and became a naturalized citizen when he was eight. Considered one of the Great Three science fiction authors, with Arthur C. Clarke and Robert A. Heinlein, Asimov is also one of the most prolific authors of all time with more than 500 published works. Graduating from high school when he was fifteen, Isaac went on to earn a B.S. and a M.S. in Chemistry and a PhD in Biochemistry from Columbia University by the time he was 28.

Winner of the Hugo and the Nebula awards for The Gods Themselves, Mr. Asmiov is best known for his Foundation series and his Robot stories. He is considered to have defined the voice of science fiction, setting a tone for the many authors to follow him. He is responsible for the three laws of robotics which are repeated and held to in innumerable science fiction works.

Mr. Asimov was a humanist and in 1984 was named the Humanist of the year. From 1985 until his death he served as President of the American Humanist Association. Asimov had a triple-bypass in 1983, resulting in the contraction of HIV from the multiple transfusions he received during this surgery. He died April 6, 1992 from subsequent complications from this infection.

Earth is Room Enough

"Here are fifteen of Isaac Asimov's expertly contrived science-fiction stories. They very from an absorbing tale of the frightening possibilities of a machine that views the past to a chilling vignette about the first superslow-motion film of an atomic explosion during which the unmistakable outline of - But just what appeared in the mushroom-cloud is part of the story. Between these extremes is a wealth of imaginative, humorous, wryly philosophic tales of uncommon interest, gripping to read but not soon forgotten. This book differs from other ones of science fiction because all of its stories have settings right here on Earth. Each story contains the ingredient that is vital to great sceince-fiction tales - an impeccable set of scientific facts which only a distinguished, real-life biochemist like Isaac Asimov would have."

Original Publication: Doubleday. October 1957
This Edition: Doubleday, October 1957
Cover Art: Tony Palladino
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Dead Past, The Foundation of S.F. Success, Franchise, Gimmicks Three, Kid Stuff, The Watery Place, Living Space, The Message, Satisfaction Guaranteed, Hell-Fire, The Last Trump, The Fun They Had, Jokester, The Immortal Bard, Someday, The Author's Ordeal, and Dreaming is a Private Thing

Review:


Nine Tomorrows

"The mind of Isaac Asimov full of earthbound knowledge of a scientist and the soaring imagination of a dreamer is a veritable incubator for ideas about tomorrow. When a bit of knowledge bumps into a bit of fantasy, out comes a short story and prediction about the future. Some of Mr. Asimov's Tomorrows may give you the shivers; others may cause resounding guffaws but all of them will give your furiously to think because there's a lethal germ of probability on every page of Asimov Tomorrow."

Original Publication: Doubleday, February 1959
This Edition: Bantam, July, 1960
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: I Just Make Them Up, See!, Profession, The Feeling of Power, The Dying Night, I'm in Marsport Without Hilda, The Gentle Vultures, All the Troubles in the World, Spell My Name with an S, The Last Question, The Ugly Little Boy and Rejection Slips

Review:


The Hugo Winners Volumes 1 & 2

"The Hugo Award is to science fiction what the Oscar is to Hollywood, and every year the coveted statuette (modeled after a spaceship) is presented at the World Science Fiction Convention. Here are twenty-three award-winning stories for the years 1955 to 1970, each with an introduction by Isaac Asimov. All of the stories here are unusual and contain that special something that marks them as prize winners. Highly original and provocative, they examine the mystery of existence and the very real possibilities that lie within the realm of future experience. And together they provide a lavish treat of the very best writing chosen by the most prominent people in the field - truly superior science fiction."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday, January 1972
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday, January 1972
Cover Art: F & J Silversmiths, Inc.
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Darfsteller by Walter M. Miller, Jr., Allamagoosa by Eric Frank Russell, Exploration Team by Murray Leinster, The Star by Arthur C. Clarke, Or All the Seas with Oysters by Avram Davidson, The Big Front Yard by Clifford D. Simak, The Hell-Bound Train by Robert Bloch, Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes, The Longest Voyage by Poul Anderson, Here I Am Again by Isaac Asimov, The Dragon Masters by Jack Vance, No Truce With Kings by Poul Anderson, Soldier, Ask Not by Gordon R. Dickson, "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman by Harlan Ellison, The Last Castle by Jack Vance, Neutron Star by Larry Niven, Weyr Search by Anne McCaffrey, Riders of the Purple Wage by Philip Jose Farmer, Gonna Roll the Bones by Fritz Leiber, I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream by Harlan Ellison, Nightwings by Robert Silverberg, The Sharing of Flesh by Poul Anderson, The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World by Harlan Ellison, Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones by Samuel R. Delaney

Review:


The Search for Elements

"Isaac Asimov here relates the story of the long quest to identity the stuff of which the universe is made. From Thales of Miletus to Seaborg of California, from alchemy to the cyclotron, from the search for the secret of turning lead into gold to the making of artificial elements, it has been a tale of follies, fakery, brilliant discoveries, and steadily building excitement. Among its heroes are Lavoisier, Mendeleev, and the Curies. Dr. Asimov relates this adventurous chronicle with scientific insight and his well-known sense of dramatic values. In a way, his book is a c ompact history of chemistry, for the development of that science has been inspired and guided by the search for elements."

Original Publication: Basic Books, June 1 1962
This Edition: Fawcett Premier, 1962
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Universe from Flat Earth to Quasar

"A fascinating guide to the new geography. Beginning with man's narrow vision of a patch of flat earth, the renowned science writer Isaac Asimov traces the steps by which our grasp of the universe has broadened and deepened to its present state. Now man pictures an expanse twenty-six billion light years in diameter, and approaches the realization of his ancient dream of conquering all of it. With the scientist's knowledge, the professional writer's craft, and the poet's imagination, Dr. Asimov leads a breathtaking voyage of discovery of space and time that makes even the most complex of theoretical concepts comprehensible, and that furnishes the basic knowledge with which to understand coming developments. Astronomy has, indeed, become the new geography; it is now the conformations of outer space that man must learn in order to continue his explorations."

Original Publication: Walker & Co., 1966
This Edition: Discus Books, February 1968
Cover Art: Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Science, Numbers and I

"Essays that stretch the mind and delight the intellect. As in his many collections, Asimov deals with pure science in a bright and clarifying way, always looking at the obverse side of the coin at hand - be it a time zone, the speed of light, population figures or the size of rivers. Until you've read a collection of his, you can't appreciate the real beauty of a scientific mind at play, probing unabashedly through some seemingly mundane facts to get at a nugget of truth."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1968
This Edition: Doubleday, 1968
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Balancing the Books, BB or Not BB, That is the Question, I'm Looking Over a Four-Leaf Clover, Portrait of the Writer as Boy, Old Man River, The Symbol-Minded Chemist, Right Beneath Your Feet, Impossible, That's All, Crowded!, A Matter of Scale, Times of Our Lives, Non-Time Travel, Twelve Point Three Six nine, Kileidoscope in the Sky, The Great Borning, Music to My Ears, and Knock Plastic!

Review


Nightfall and Other Stories

"Witness this.A civilization's first - and last - sunset.A dedicated scientist who whips up his own love potion.Machines that learn to think for themselves - and direct their thoughts to overturning the establishment.The discovery that Earthlings are being destroyed by a mysterious kind of psychological virus...A day when walking outdoors becomes a sign of psychosis..."

Original Publication: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Clube, December 1969
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, Unknown year of publication
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Nightfall, Green Patches, Hostess, Breeds There a Man?, The C-Chute, "In a Good Cause-," What If, Sally, Flies, Nobody Here But-, It's Such a Beautiful Day, Strikebreaker, Insert Know A in Hole B, The Up-to-Date Sorcerer, Unto the Fourth Generation, What Is This Thing Called Love?, The Machine That Won the War, My Son the Physicist!, Eyes Do More Than See and Segregationist all by Isaac Asimov

Review


Words of Science and the History Behind Them

"Under 250 headings - from "Absolute Zero" to "Zodiac" - Isaac Asimov explores, explains and illuminates the scientific vocabulary. In all some 1500 terms are traced through history, from their simple roots in the language of bygone times - to their complicated usages today."

Original Publication: Houghton Mifflin, 1959
This Edition: Signet, 1969
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Opus 100

"Isaac Asimov needs no introduction. As the Columbus Dispatch declares, he is the man who legitimized Science Fiction in the United States. But this is just part of the fabulous Asimov story. For this bestselling author has also explored virtually every branch of human knowledge in his mind-expanding writings. Now, in a blend of science and fiction that only he could achieve, Isaac Asimov takes you on a personally guided tour of the brightest adventure and delights in the Asimov Galaxy."

Original Publication: Houghton Mifflin, June 1969
This Edition: Dell, October 1970
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Asimov's 100th book

Review:


David Starr, Space Ranger

"Planet in turmoil! The Solar System had long ago been colonized by an Earth suffering from a dwindling food supply and a millionfold increase in population. The colonies were her very lifeblood. Without the daily floow of products from them, Earth would experience mass starvation and chaos within weeks. Suddenly and unexpectedly, reports of fatal food poisoning, traceable to Martian produce, began to reach the ruling Council of Science. Each new case was treated with intense secrecy for if the people of Earth learned the cause of these deaths, a worldwide panic would surely ensue. To David Starr, Space Ranger, these deadly incidents formed a terrifying pattern - they were clearly part of a clever and brutal scheme by an alien conspiracy to cripple Earth's economic life and topple its government!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, February 1952
This Edition: Signet, December 1971
Cover Art: Bob Pepper
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Lucky Starr Series, Book #1

Review:


Fact and Fancy

"In Fact and Fancy, Dr. Asimov has drawn inspiration from the realm of pure scientific fact, without permitting himself to be confined by its inflexible borders. Beginning with statements that are solidly rooted in accepted truth, he has given rein to his highly ingenious imagination and constructed hypothetical situations that are at once fanciful and completely reasonable. The many intriguing questions explored by Dr. Asimov range from What lies beyond the planets (just possibly, a lot of ice!), to When can you escape the reach of gravity (you can't - ever!). These and other fascinating, informative speculations offer a treasury of brilliant, startling ideas - logical extensions of today's science and more stimulating than the wildest fictions!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, March 1962
This Edition: Discus, March 1972
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Life's Bottleneck, No More Ice Ages?, Thin Air, Catching Up with Newton, Of Capture and Escape, Catskills in the Sky, Beyond Pluto, Steppingstones to the Stars, The Planet of the Double Sun, Heaven on Earth, Our Lonely Planet, The Flickering Yardstick, The Sight of Home, Here it Comes; There it Goes, Those Crazy Ideas, My Built-in Doubter and Battle of the Eggheads

Review:


From Earth to Heaven

""The thrill of unexpected discovery" That, according to Isaac Asimov in his introduction to this highly thought-provoking book, "cannot help but stir the blood." And stir the blood he died, as the reader is taken on an intriguing journey through basic scientific questions dealing with the Earth (how high is up?), to the physicist's real land (its called "Mu"), and, ultimately, to the most baffling speculation of all - the size of the entire universe! But, whatever the immediate subject at hand, Dr. Asimov is always brilliant in his lucid expositions of the most current scientific theories. He has given us "a book to stretch the mind and the imagination...glimpses of the vast domain of the sciences.""

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1966
This Edition: Discus, 1972
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Harmony in Heaven, Oh, East is West and West is East, The Certainty of Uncertainty, To Tell a Chemist, Future? Tense!, Exclamation Point!, Behind the Teacher's Back, Death to the Laboratory, The Land of Mu, Squ-u-u-ush!, Water, Water, Everywhere, The Proton-Reckoner, Up and Down the Earth, The Rocks of Damocles, The Nobelmen of Science, Time and Tide and The Isles of Earth

Review:


The Stars, Like Dust

"Half a century before, the Nebular Kingdoms had been conquered by the cruel and domineering Tyranni, the war lords of Tyrann. Now Biron Farril's father had disappeared and Biron himself was marked for murder. He knew that his enemies were backed by the Tyranni. And that they were really responsible. But why had he and his father been singled out for destruction? The answer takes him through the cosmic reaches of the galaxies. It becomes a quest for the Rebellion World the hidden planet that shelters a conspiracy against the Tyranni and holds the only hope of peace for man's future. The quest is a dangerous one. The stakes are either the end of the Tyranni or the end of Biron Farrill."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1951
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, June 1972
Cover Art: Paul Lehr
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Serialized under the name Tyrann in Galaxy Science Fiction in 1951

Review:


The Caves of Steel

"Detective R. Daneel Olivaw was a robot! When Lije Baley was summoned by the police commissioner to investigate the murder of Spacetown's leading scientist, he was told his new partner would be a robot a very special robot, created by the murdered man himself. News of the crime had to be kept secret. And it had to be solved before the hostile Spacetowners could use it to cause political upheaval. Olivaw's identity also had to be kept secret. Anti-robot feeling was reaching riot proportions. The mission was almost impossible for a human. But R. Daneel Olivaw wasn't human. Detective Baley found Daneel's way to the truth the most terrifying experience of his life."

Original Publication: Doubleday, May 1954
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, January 1972
Cover Art: John Berkey
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Adapted for a BBC television series Story Parade in 1964, a Kodak VCR game in 1988 and a BBC radio play in 1989

Review:


The Gods Themselves

"The year is 2100 A.D. and a man no longer stands alone in the universe. Now there are other worlds, other living beings. Alien beings who mate in threes and live on pure energy. New breeds of humans who have created their own environment and freed themselves from every social and sexual taboo. Yes, it is a future of new worlds, ever changing worlds. And yet among them there is still earth. Earth, where man still strives to be the best. To advance himself beyond all other beings and their worlds. And this final, glorious step in mankind's technical progress has been achieved: the discovery of an unlimited, non-polluting energy source. But what seems to be progress may, in reality, end in complete tragedy. Earth's unlimited energy source is about to trigger unlimited destruction - and the end of the universe."

Original Publication: Doubleday, May 1972
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, June 1973
Cover Art: Charles Moll
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1972 and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1973

Review:


The Best From If Volume 2

"Far out adventures by master builders of fantastic worlds! *Isaac Asimov Stranger in Paradise - The only two brothers left in the world join forces to create a very human-like robot! *Michael Bishop Death and Designation Among the Asadi - Were the alien Asadi intelligent beings of mindless monsters? As Egan Chaney's understanding grew, so did his repulsion...and a compelling fascination that might destroy him! *Fred Saberhagen Wings Out of Shadow - A wild new Berserker story! A weird and novel weapon! The paralyzing inhuman killer machines confront a human adversary literally raised from a dead-and-by-gone era! *Clifford Simak Construction Shack - The first expedition team to Pluto makes an incredible discovery - a set of abandoned blueprints! *Gene Wolfe Westwind - On a stormy night in a seedy cafe...a scarred young man, a beautiful blind girl and a cynical old woman come together by change. Each ot them holds a peculiar secret!"

Original Publication: Award Books, September 1974
This Edition: Award Books, September 1974
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Construction Shack by Clifford D. Simak, Susie's Reality by Bob Stickgold, Mnarra Mobilis by Sydney J. VanScyoc, Westwind by Gene Wolfe, Death and Designation Among the Asadi by Michael Bishop, Guest Editorial by Frederik Pohl, Wings Out of Shadow by Fred Saberhagen and Stranger in Paradise by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Asimov on Astronomy

"In this book Isaac Asimov uncovers facts about the solar system you may have never known before. Starting with the tides of the sea his discussion moves to the inner planets, the Asteroid Belt, the Gas Giants and, finally, the galaxy. Along the way, Asimov speculates on topics from extraterrestrial life to what a tenth planet might be like."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1974
This Edition: Doubleday, 1974
Cover Art: NASA
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Time and Tide, The Rocks of Damocles, Harmony in Heaven, The Trojan Horse, By Jove!, Superficially Speaking, Round and Round and..., Beyond Pluto, Just Mooning Around, Steppingstones to the Stars, The Planet of the Double Sun, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, Heaven on Earth, The Flickering Yardstick, The Sight of Home, The Black of Night and A Galaxy at a Time by Isaac Asimov. Essays originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction

Review:


Before the Golden Age, Book 1

"8 vintage science fiction stories by masters of the genre.Before the Golden Age, Book 1, is the first of a three-part edition. These eight fantastic tales were specifically chosen by Isaac Asimov for the lasting effect they have had on his early life and works. The stories included are: *The Man Who Evolved by Edmond Hamilton *The Gameson Satellite by Neil R. Jones *Submicroscopic by Capt. S. P. Meek *Awlo of Ulm by Capt. S. P. Meek *Tetrahedra of Space by P. Schuyler Miller *The World of the Red Sun by Clifford D. Simak *Tumithak of the Corridors by Charles R. Tanner *The Moon Era by Jack Williamson...Each of these classics has an introduction by Dr. Asimov."

Original Publication: Doubleday, April 1974
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, April 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Part One: 1920 to 1930 by Isaac Asimov, Part Two: 1931 by Isaac Asimov, The Man Who Evolvedby Edmond Hamilton, The Jameson Satellite by Neil R. Jones, Submicroscopic by S.P. Meek, Awlo of Ulm by S.P. Meek, Tetrahedra of Space by P. Schuyler Miller, The World of the Red Sun by Clifford D. Simak, Part Three: 1932 by Isaac Asimov, Tumithak of the Corridors by Charles R. Tanner and The Moon Era by Jack Williamson

Review:


Pebble in the Sky

"Earthman beware! Two minutes before he disappeared forever from the face of the Earth he knew, Joseph Schwartz was strolling down the pleasant streets of a Chicago suburb, thinking about his family. He was a simple man, a kind man, a practical man not given to wild flights of the imagination. So when he saw the old Raggedy Ann doll lying in his path, he merely smiled and lifted his foot to step over it...That was the only thing he remembered. He did not know that it marked the last act of his life on this Earth...and the beginning of a terrifying journey into a strange new world where the twentieth century was already ancient history."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1950
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, 1976
Cover Art: Paul Lehr
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Today and Tomorrow and....

"Asimov on Today - Can we reset our biological clocks? What are those mountains doing flying around in space? Does the romance of life flourish on Mars? Is there more to air than we think? On Tomorrow - How can a cold, two-week lunar offer a safer environment than earth? Why is it vital for women to get into outer space? How to science fiction writers predict the future? and - much, much more in this intriguing compendium of fascinating facts about our universe and ourselves."

Original Publication: Doubleday, April 1973
This Edition: Dell, August 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: What Do You Call a Platypus?, The Rythm of Day and Night, The Sun Vanishes, The Flying Mountains, The Romance of Mars, The Knowledge of Anywhere, Earth, Air, Water, Fire, Space, Time, Mass, You Can't Even Break Even, The Secret of the Squis, How Many Inches in a Mile?, Beyond the Ultimate, The Lunar Landing, After Apollo, What?, No Space for Women?, Future Fun, Personal Flight, Freedon at Last, The Age of the Computer, The End, The End, Unless, The Fourth Revolution, The Perfect Machine, Prediction as a Side Effect, The Serious Side of Science Fiction, A Literature of Ideas and The Scientists' Responsibility all by Isaac Asimov

Review:


The Bicentennial Man and Other Stories

"Celebrating nearly a half century of the work of Isaac Asimov, this volume contains eleven recent short stories,including his popular "The Bicentennial Man," as wella s the impromptu poem "Prime of Life" (more informally known as "I'm in the Prime of Life, You Rotten Kid!") and the never-filmed scenario "Waterclap." Together with these outstanding stories by the grand master is his autobiographical commentary on each of them. They reveal not only his great storytelling wizardry but his profound understanding of our times...and future as well. Appearing originally in publications ranging from the New York Times (its first science fictino tale ever published!) to the former If magazine (its last!), with themes leading from Women's Liberation to "Feminine Intuition," from Bicentennial to "Death at the Tercentennial," and from mathematical games to life-and-death struggles, these short stories examine Asmovian landscape with typical wit and understanding."

Original Publication: Doubleday, August 1976
This Edition: Doubleday, August 1976
Cover Art: Peter Rauch
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Prime of Life, Feminine Intuition, Waterclap, That Thou Art Mindful of Him, Stranger in Paradise, The Life and Times of Multivac, The Winnowing, The Bicentennial Man, Marching In, Old-Fashioned, The Tercentenary Incident and Birth of a Notion by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Please Explain

"How long will the sun be able to sustain life on Eart? Is there life on Mars? How hot can a star get? What are imaginary numbers? What would happen if an irresistible force met an immovable body? What is cosmic dust and where does it come from? What is meant by curved space? What is, briefly and simply, Einstein's theory of relativity? How dangerous are cosmic rays to men in space? How did life begin? Why did the dinosaurs die off? What is the difference between a brain and a computer? What is the greenhouse effect? How will the Earth end?"

Original Publication: Houghton Mifflin, October 1973
This Edition: Dell Laurel-Leaf, February 1976
Cover Art: Berkey
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Hugo Winners Volume 3 Book 2

"The Hugo Award is to science fiction what the Oscar is to the film industry. Every year the coveted award is presented at the World Science Fiction Convention to the author of the best novella or short story in the realm of science fiction. In this volume are the Hugo Prizewinners for 1973 through 1975, each with an introduction by science-fiction master Isaac Asimov. Among these special and fascinating stories are "The Word for World is Forest" by Ursula K. LeGuin, "Goat Song" by Poul Anderson, "The Meeting" by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth, "The Girl Who Was Plugged In" by James Tiptree, Jr., "A Song for Lya by George R.R. Martin, and "The Hole Man" by Larry Niven. The Hugo Winners Volume 3, Book 2 provides a lavish treat of the very best writing chosen by the most prominent people in the field - truly superior science fiction."

Original Publication: Fawcett Crest, July 1979
This Edition: Fawcett Crest July, 1979
Cover Art: Attila Hejia
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction by Isaac Asimov, The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. LeGuin, Goat Song by Poul Anderson, The Meeting by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth, Eurema's Dam by R.A. Lafferty, The Girl Who Was Plugged In by James Tiptree, Jr., The Deathbird by Harlan Ellison, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Ursula K. LeGuin, A Song for Lya by George R.R. Martin, Adrift Just Off the Islets of Langerhans: Latitude 38 54' N, Longitude 77 00' 13" W by Harlan Ellison and The Hole Man by Larry Niven

Review:


The Hugo Winners Volume 3

"What is the very best short science fiction - according to science fiction fans themselves? The short stories and short novels collected here hold the most recent prizes. They are the Hugo Winners. Among the brightest starsin the crown of science fiction are the winners of the coveted Hugo Awards. The Hugos are presented each year at the World Science Fiction Convention, where the competition is fierce but where the voting is done by members of the convention, all of them highly knowledgable about what has been written in the field, and outstanding judges of what makes really good science fiction reading. In this volume are the Hugo price-winers for 1971 through 1975, once again presented, in this inlimitable fashion, by Isaac Asimov, science fiction master and himself winner of two Hugos in earlier years. needless to say, Asimov's introductions to each story are as engaging and fresh as ever. A must for every collector of science fiction."

Original Publication: Doubleday, August 1977
This Edition: Doubleday, August 1977
Cover Art: Robert Jay Silverman
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Third Time Around by Isaac Asimov, Ship of Shadows by Fritz Leiber, Ill Met in Lankmar by Fritz Leiber, Slow Sculpture by Theodore Sturgeon, The Queen of Air and Darkness by Poul Anderson, Inconstant Moon by Larry Niven, The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. le Guin, Goat Song by Poul Anderson, The Meeting by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth, Eurema's Dam by R.A. Lafferty, The Girl Who Was Plugged In by James Tiptree, Jr., The Deathbird by Harlan Ellison, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Ursula K. le Guin, A Song for Lya by George R. R. Martin, Adrift Just Off the Islets of Langerhans: Latitude 38 54' N, Longitude 77 00' 13" W by Harlan Ellison and The Hole Man by Larry Niven

Review:


The Planet that Wasn't

"The astonishing story of the planet Vulcan, an astronomical oddity that intrigued scientists for over a century, is the jumping off point for Isaac Asimov in these scintillating, easy to understand explorations of everything from ecology and space colonies to witchcraft and UFOs. Here is Asimov at his best, where his wide-ranging intellect can play with such amazingly eclectic topics as the notorious Martian canals, the possibility of life on the Jovian satellite Titan, the deadly dangers of cholesterol and aerosol cans, the smell of electricity, and nine explanations for the Star of Bethlehem. Equally amazing is the manner in which his stories unfold, from a lovely description of how rainbows are made, to the water clear logic in his refutation of the "judo arguments" - scientific proofs for the existence of God. Provocative, entertaining, and, as always, generously interspersed with sparkling Asimov wit, The Planet that Wasn't debunks old myths and offers fresh perspectives on the wonders of our solar system and ourselves."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1976
This Edition: Discus, December 1977
Cover Art: Dean Ellis
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction by Martin H. Greenberg, The Planet that Wasn't, The Olympian Snows, Titanic Surprise, The Wrong Turning, The Bridge of the Gods, The Third Liquid, All Gall, The Smell of Electricity, Silent Victory, Change of Air, The Wicked Witch is Dead, The Nightfall Effect, The Rocketing Dutchmen, Best Food Backward, Thinking About Thinking, Star in the East and The Judo Argument

Review:


The Currents of Space

"High in their fortified city, protected by brutal mercenaries, the Sarkites live in magnificent luxury. Below them, in the eternal Spring of Florina, "the most beautiful planet in the Galaxy," the native Florinians labor ceaselessly in dire poverty to produce the precioius kyrt fiber that brings wealth to their masters, the Squires of Sark. Revolt is impossible. Under the total domination of the Sarkites, Florina has lost even the concept of freedom. The smallest sign of resistance to Sarkite rule brings immediate death. If there is any hope for the Florinians, it lies with the Trantorian Empire, whose grand scheme it is to unite all humanity in peace, propserity and freedom under its benign rulership. But the Empire cannot move against the Squires of Sark for fear of disrupting the kyrt trade. Should the flow of kyrt cease, many planets would rise in armed rebellion against the Empire. The price - civil war - is too great. The liberation of Florina will have to wait...perhaps forever. Suddenly there comes a cryptic warning from space. "Florina is doomed...the Galaxy is endangered...everyone on Florina will die...the Currents of Space are bringing destruction." The threat is too bizarre to believe, too frightening to ingore. If the warning is true, the planet can be evacuated, but the power of Sark, and the wealth of the Squires will end. The Earthman who sent the message is abducted and brainwashed. His memory gone, he is abandoned among the Florinian slaves, unable to walk, speak, or feed himself. Cared for by a childless Florinian woman, he recovers enough to become a manual laborer, and is regarded as the village idiot. Returning memory begins to drive him. His need to deliver the warning pits him against the full power of Sarkite oppression and reveals him to anxious watchers. Some would rescue him for the information he carries. Others would kill him to suppress it. The fate of Florina and the peace of the Galaxy depend on his survival."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1952
This Edition: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1978
Cover Art: Ed Valigurski
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


The Far Ends of Time and Earth

"This volume of some of the earliest fiction of Isaac Asimov begins a new series of omnibus editions that will eventually encompass all of the master's science fiction and mysteries. Here are several of Asimov's debut fantasies - works that have been out-of-print in hardcover for many years: Pebble in the Sky, which enjoys the distinction of being the Doctor's first published book; Earth Is Room Enough, a collection of short stories; and a wonderful tale of time travel, The End of Eternity. All are set on a futuristic Earth - on the Day of Judgment; during the reign of the Eternals; at a time when Earth is radioactive and an ourcast from the rest of the Universe. The Far Ends of Time and Earth: three hallmarks of the Asimovian imagination are as far-reaching and mind-expanding today as when they were first published."

Original Publication: Doubleday, January 1979
This Edition: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1979
Cover Art: Robert Korn
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Pebble in the Sky, Earth Is Room Enough, The Dead Past, The Foundation of S. F. Success, Franchise, Gimmicks Three, Kid Stuff, The Watery Place, Living Space, The Message, Satisfaction Guaranteed, Hell-Fire, The Last Trump, The Fun They Had, Jokester, The Immortal Bard, Someday, The Author's Ordeal, Dreaming Is a Private Thing and The End of Eternity

Review:


Marvels of Science Fiction

"The world in which we live is a place of many marvels. Our lives contain television and telephones, airplanes and air conditioners, atomic bombs and atomic power. As recently as a century ago, these things would have been considered science fiction. The marvels you are about to discover are science fiction - now. A hundred years from now...who knows? Explore the marvels of science fiction such writers as Isaac Asimov, Randall Garrett, Jo Clayton, Barry B Longyear, John M. Ford, F. Paul Wilson, Martin Gardner, and more. In this collection of stories from Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, you can discover the marvels of science fiction for yourself. See Mars through the eyes of a group of clones - are they less than human, more than human, or only human after all? You can visit with the performers on a far-off circus planet, or guard the Earth with a poetic human computer. If you wish, you can see the two suns of the planet Jaydugar and travel its paths to freedom or slavery. If you tire of the future, you can return to Earth in the distant past and look in on what may be humanity's most important business deal. You can have a bit of sport, as well. Fishing for chispen on Gelk can be profitable, fun - and fatal. A visit to the beach with a creature from the stars is also relaxing; perhaps you'll meet the castaway captain and his mate. If you do, you'll recognize them right off. One of the greatest marvels of science fiction is its ability to say, "What if?" What if, for instance, Richard the Lion-hearted had not died so abruptly? Come visit Lord Darcy's world. You'll find it an interesting change. Science fiction recognizes the marvels that surround us and takes them one step further. Look around you at the marvels of our world, and then step into the marvels of science fiction."

Original Publication: Dial Press, December 1979
This Edition: Dial Press, December 1979
Cover Art: Alex Schomburg
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Edited by George H. Schithers. Interior Artwork by Frank Kelly Freas, Karl Kofoed, Jack Gaughan, Alex Schomburg, Michael Whelan, Freff and Phil Foglio. Contents: In the Country of the Blind, No One Can See by Melisa Michaels, Proud Rider by Barry B. Longyear, The Three Robots of Professor Tinker by Martin Gardner, On the Q167 File by John M. Ford, Softly Touch the Stranger's Mind by E. Amalia Andujar, The Last Master of Limericks by Garry R. Osgood, First Solution to the Three Robots of Professor Tinker by Martin Gardner, A Bait of Dreams by Jo Clayton, Nothing for Nothing by Isaac Asimov, The Adventure of the Globar Traveler or: THe Blobal Consequences of How the Reichenback Falls into the Wells of Iniquitie by Anne Lear, A Time for Terror by Barry B. Longyear (as by Frederick Longbeard), A Second Solution to the Three Robots of Professor Tinker by Martin Gardner, To Fill the Sea and Air by F. Paul Wilson, One Rejection Too Many by Patricia Nurse, On the Way by Conway Conley, The Castaways by J.M. Dillard and The Napoli Express by Randall Garrett.

Review:


In Memory Yet Green: The Autobiography of Isaac Asimov, 1920-1954

"The Good Doctor's two-hundredth book! The amazing Isaac Asimov has once more taken pen in hand to tackle his most fascinating subject to date - himself. In this first volume of his autobiography he recounts in his candid and inimitable manner his life's work in science, science fcition, and practically everything else. Beginning at the beginning, Asimov tells of his family's emigration from Russia when he was only three. We see the young Isaac, barely more than a toddler, determined to decipher Brooklynese, Intrigued by signs in the "new" language, he taught himself to read, and whizzed through school as a child prodigy, without modesty, getting A's in everything except deportment. In his early years at school he befriended a talkative little boy who held Isaac spellbound with his stories. This was Isaac's first introduction to fiction, and soon afterward he began to borrow science fiction magazines from the rack in his father's candy store, reading them in secret, and returning them, still looking like new. Entering college at the age of fifteen, he emerged with a doctorate in chemistry from Columbia University. Then there were his stints at the Navy Yard in Philadelphia during World War II and in the Army (for once the military couldn't fail to recognize a genius!), his first maggiage, and his years teaching biochemistry - to standing ovations from his classes - at Boston University Medical School. All this time he was rising to eminence as a story teller, author of The Foundation Trilogy and "Nightfall," and laying the groundwork for his future as our most outstanding diverse science writer. In short, this is a book where the man who has been called a "national resource and a natural wonder" tells how he got to be that way. A treasure trove for Asimov fans of all ages, all walks of life."

Original Publication: Doubleday, February 1979
This Edition: Doubleday, February 1979
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


The 7 Deadly Sins of Science Fiction

"The 7 deadly sins. They pave the road to hell. But look down that road,and you might think "What a way to go!" And so you take that first step. And the next. Then the road begins to bend, full of funny twists and unexpected turns and an occasional detour. The trip through The 7 Deadly Sins of Science Fiction is one you will never, ever forget. LUST...All you need is a little insight. And you'll soon discover that what all mena nd women really have in common is....ENVY...There's nothing wrong with wanting to be the best. And wanting to stay the best. But there's always going to be someone who's just a tinge green....PRIDE...What kind of man would he be if he wouldn't sacrifice everything to maintain that high opinion of himself? And he can take pleasure in the sacrifice. But, of course, the last thing to go must always be..."

Original Publication: Unknown
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, 1980
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Editing collaboration with Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh. Contents: Sail 25 by Jack Vance, Peeping Tom by Judith Merril, The Invisible Man Murder Case by Henry Slesar, Galley Slave by Isaac Asimov, Divine Madness by Roger Zelazny, The Midas Plague by Frederik Pohl, The Man Who Are the World by Frederik Pohl, A Margin of Profit by Poul Anderson and The Hook, the Eye and the Whip by Michael G. Coney

Review:


The Great SF Stories 4

"What an incredible year was 1942 in the rise of modern science fiction! Even perhaps more so than the brilliant preceding years of the Golden Age. Here in this, the fourth volume of the classic Asimov selection, are stories that every science fiction reader considers to be truly legendary. Included among them are Asimov's Foundation, Lester del Rey's Nerves, A. E. Van Vogt's The Weapons Shop, Lewis Padgett's The Twonky, Alfred Bester's The Push of a Finger, and other memorable tales by Anthony Boucher, George O. Smith, Donald A. Wollheim and Hal Clement. Whether as a permanent addition to your basic science fiction collection or just for the pleasure of reading fabulous mind-boggling stories that have not lost their power to astonish even through the decades that were to follow their original publication, this is one book no one can afford to miss."

Original Publication: DAW, October 1980
This Edition: DAW, October 1980
Cover Art: Antonio Bernal
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Editing collaboration with Martin H. Greenberg. Contents: The Star Mouse by Fredric Brown, The Wings of Night by Lester del Rey, Cooperate - Or Else! by A. E. Van Vogt, Foundation by Isaac Asimov, The Push of a Finger by Alfred Bester, Asylum by A. E. Van Vogt, Proof by Hal Clement, Nerves by Lester del Rey, Barrier by Anthony Boucher, The Twonky by C. L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett), QRM - Interplanetary by George O. Smith, The Weapon Shop by A. E. Van Vogt and Mimic by Donald A. Wollheim

Review:


In Joy Still Felt: The Autobiography of Isaac Asimov, 1954-1978

"As the author of over 200 books, to say nothing of articles and short stories in addition, Dr. Isaac Asimov attracts superlatives with a force stronger than gravity. In this volume of his autobiography the elder statesman of science and science fiction explains just how he becomes a space age phenomenon. Continuing his further adventures with characteristic Asmovian wit and candor, the Good Doctor recounts his amazing career from his first brush with fame to his current renown as an eminent writer, lecturer, scientist, teacher, and science fiction master. From his first book to his 200th, from early rejections to critical acclaim, the Russian-born Brooklyn boy details his achievements with an attitude of "cheerful self-appreciation," and compares the glories of a celebrity with the woes of compulsive writer. Paralleled with Asimov "the human writing machine" - producer of a career average of six books per year - is Asimov the caring husband, the doting father, the inveterate joker. With enough sparkling anecdotes to fill outer space expounds upon life, love, fame, book reviews, science fiction conventions, talk shows, eclipses, and other facts of life as he has encountered them. He shares both public and private moments with sincerity and "charming immodesty." Asimov writes about Asimov with the same vitality he lends to all his subjects, and this volume adds to his staggering bibliography a colorful and animated portrait of the author himself in his "late youth.""

Original Publication: Doubleday, April 1980
This Edition: Doubleday, April 1980
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Treasury

"Published for the first time in a single volume are two of Isaac Asimov's latest and most remarkable science fiction anthologies, The Future in Question and Space Mail. Here we find the greatest of the genre's short stories from the fifties, sixties and seventies produced by such masterminds as Edmond Hamilton, William Tenn, John W. Campbell, Jr., Theodore Sturgeon, A.E. Van Vogt, Judith Merril, Gordon R. Dickson, and Isaac Asimov himself. Asimov's short introductions to each story, leading to he better understanding of the authors' works, are an invaluable tool for both the science fiction buff and the novice. With the exception of Isaac Asimov's story, all the titles in The Future in Question ask questions - terrifying, unanswerable, and unsettling questions - designed to provoke, astound and bewilder. The following will give you a little taste of what is in store in the pages ahead. *"What's It Like Out There?" What is it really like to be out in space?....*"Who Can Replace a Man?" WIll anyone or "anywhat" come after the extinction of out species?....*"Why?" Why go out into space at all? Why run the risks? Why?...The stories in Space Mail, ingeniously presented as real-life letters, diaries, and memos, deliver bizarre, eerie, and emotionally overpowering signals from beyond and messages from deep within. In "Flowers for Algernon," the famous story later made into the film Charly, Daniel Keyes deals with the heart-wrenching problem of mental retardation and miraculous, science fictional cure. A.E. van Vogt's "Dear Pen Pal" records the havoc wreaked by an extraterrestrial pen pal in delightfully amusing letters. And Howard Fast's "The Trap" traces the bizarre consequences of a bold experiment designed to create a race of superchildren. As you begin to explore these penetrating questions and this cosmic correspondence, you will witness some of the strangest happenings of this world and the one beyond, of today and tomorrow, and perhaps you will begin to unravel some of their deepest memories."

Original Publication: Bonanza Books/Crown Publishers, March 1981
This Edition: Bonanza Books/Crown Publishers, March 1981
Cover Art: Don Dixon
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Omnibus reprint of The Future in Question and Space Mail, anthologies published in 1980 by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Joseph Olander. Contents: The Nature of the Title by Isaac Asimov, What's It Like Out There? by Edmond Hamilton, Who Can Replace Man? by Brian W. Aldiss, What Have I Done? by Mark Clifton, Who's There? by Arthur C. Clarke, Can You Feel Anything When I Do This? by Robert Sheckley, Why? by Robert Silverberg, What's Become of Screwloose? by Ron Goulart, Houston, Houston, Do You Read? by James Tiptree, Jr., Where Have You Been, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? by Kate Wilhelm, If All Men Were Brothers, Would You Let One Marry Your Sister? by Theodore Sturgeon, Will You Wait? by Alfred Bester, Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell, Jr., An Eye for a What? by Damon Knight, I Plinglot, Who You? by Frederik Pohl, Will You Walk a Little Faster? by William Tenn, Who's In Charge Here? by James Blish, The Last Question by Isaac Asimov, Introduction (Space Mail) by Isaac Asimov, I Never Ast No Favors by C.M. Kornbluth, Letter to Ellen by Chan Davis, One Rejection Too Many by Patricia Nurse, Space Opera by Ray Russell, That Only a Mother by Judith Merril, Itch on the Bull Run by Sharon Webb, Letter to a Phoenix by Fredric Brown, Who's Cribbing? by Jack Lewis, Computers Don't Argue by Gordon R. Dickson, Letters from Laura by Mildred Clingerman, Dear Pen Pal by A.E. van Vogt, Damn Shame by Dean R. Lambe, The Trap by Howard Fast, Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes, The Second Kind of Loneliness by George R.R. Martin, The Lonely by Judith Merril, Secret Unattainable by A.E. van Vogt, After the Great Space War by Barry N. Malzberg, The Prisoner by Christopher Anvil, Request for Proposal by Anthony R. Lewis, He Walked Around the Horses by H. Beam Piper and The Power by Murray Leinster

Review:


The Great SF Stories 5

"This, the fifth volume of the Asimov selections, brings back into print such marvelous stories as Leigh Brackett's The Halfling, Fredric Brown's Daymare, Eric Franks Russell's Symbiotica, Lewis Padgett's Mimsy Were the Borogroves, C.L. Moore's Doorway Into TIme, and lots more! The great Golden days of science fiction are here again!"

Original Publication: DAW, March 1981
This Edition: DAW, March 1981
Cover Art: One Plus One Studio
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction by Martin H. Greenberg, The Cave by P. Schuyler Miller, The Halfling by Leigh Brackett, Mimsy Were the Borogroves by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, Q.U.R. by Anthony Boucher, Clash by Night by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, Exile by Edmond Hamilton, Daymare by Fredric Brown, Doorway Into Time by C.L. Moore, The Storm by A.E. van Vogt, The Proud Robot Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, Symbiotica by Eric Frank Russell and The Iron Standard by C.L. Moore

Review:


The Complete Robot

"It was Isaac Asimov who coined the word "robotics" almost forty years ago. No less than seven of his collections have included stories of metal, plastic, and even organix mechanical men (and a woman or two as well, not to mention a dog) whose positronic brains lead them - into every variety of situation, often of the most unexpected sort and with the most unlooked-for consequences. Now Asimov's robot tales have been gathered under one cover for the first time. In The Complete Robot's thirty-one stories you'll meet Ronnie, the faithful nursemaid, and Tony, whose thoughtful and considerate attentions to a lonely wife provoke an all-too-human response. There are robots who do not behave as they were designed to, robots who obey their iridium brains all too literally, and robots who aspire to humanity. And then there are the humans: Mike Donovan and Greg Powell, the field testers for experimental models: Peter Bogert, Alfred Lanning, Gerald Black, and the rest of U.S. Robots and Mechanical Men research and development staff - and especially the company's chief robot-psychologist, the steely Dr. Susan Calvin. Here is every last one of Isaac Asimov's robot stories, including some which have never before appeared in a book. Asimov fans, science fiction fans, robot fans, and those who love entertaining, logical, puzzling, and stimulating tales will all welcome The Complete Robot."

Original Publication: Doubleday, July 1982
This Edition: Doubleday, July 1982
Cover Art: Kiyoshi Kanai
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: A Boy's Best Friend, Sally, Someday, Point of View, Think!, True Love, Robot AL-76 Goes Astray, Victory Unintentional, Stranger in Paradise, Light Verse, Segregationist, Robbie, Let's Get Together, Mirror Image, The Tercentenary Incident, First Law, Runaround, Reason, Catch That Rabbit, Liar!, Satisfaction Guaranteed, Lenny, Galley Slave, Little Lost Robot, Risk, Escape!, Evidence, The Evitable Conflict, Feminine Intuition, That Thou Art Mindful of Him and The Bicentennial Man

Review:


The Naked Sun

"Murder in Paradise. Solaria was a beautiful planet, but a sparsely settled one. The Solarians had so isolated themselves that direct contact with others was almost unbearable, and all interpersonal dealings were conducted by solid-seeming trimensional projections. Now there had been a murder. The victim had been so neurotic that even the presence of his wife was barely endurable. But someone had been close enough to beat him to death while he was attended by his robots. Naturally, the robots couldn't have done it - the first law of robotics would not let them harm a human being. No weapon had been found. It seemed a paradox. So the authorities sent for Lije Baley, who was delighted to find that his old partner, the human-seeming robot R. Daneel Olivaw, would join him. The partnership was back in business - a strange business, indeed."

Original Publication: Doubleday, March 1957
This Edition: Del Rey, November 1983
Cover Art: Michael Herring
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Adapted for BBC series Out of the Unknown in 1969

Review:


The Golden Years of Science Fiction - Fifth Series

"Isaac Asimov Presents the Golden Years of Science Fiction, Fifth Series, continues the popular series edited by Isaac Asimov and Martin H. Greenberg. Culling the very best from the art form, Asimov and Greenberg now concentrate on the years 1947 and 1948, the time when science fiction was emerging from the so-called Golden Age into the Diamond Age of the genre, as writers approached their subject with greater maturity and craft. Well-known writers are amply represented - Poul Anderson, Ray Bradbury, Theodore Sturgeon, H. Beam Piper, Isaac Asimov, John D. MacDonald, Martin Gardner, and many others. The stories is this collection show a fascination with, and concern about, radiation and its effects, an understandable concern after the shock of the atom bomb, which was first used in 1945. Science fiction writers found this new development almost more compelling than threats from unknown planets and bizarre monsters; the possibility of what man might have done to the race and the planet with the atom bomb provides the starting point for many of the stories in this collection. "That Only a Mother" by Judith Merril is a most chilling story about what the atom bomb might do to our children. John D. MacDonald wrote two stories on the subject, "A Child Is Crying," a grim prediction of the effects of radiation on children, and the much more lighthearted "Ring Around the Redhead," which shows that nuclear testing can have a positive side. Wilmar H. Shiras' story "In Hiding" views the effects of radiation more as a "wild card" in the possibility of genetic mutation. But stories set on other planets and stories that take place in the future are also well represented. Martin Gardner's "Thang" is a classic monster piece, and "The Brooklyn Project" by William Tenn is a tour de force on the subject of government bereaucracy and its inability to see the whole picture. The stories collected here will give hours of reading pleasure to science fiction buffs and to anyone else who enjoys good writing."

Original Publication: Doubleday, March 1957
This Edition: Del Rey, November 1983
Cover Art: Michael Herring
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Martini H. Greenberg. Contents: Little Lost Robot by Isaac Asimov, Tomorrow's Children by Poul Anderson and F. N. Waldrop, Child's Play by William Tenn, Time and Time Again by H. Beam Piper, Tiny and the Monster by Theodore Sturgeon, E for Effort T. L. Sherred, Letter to Ellen by Chan Davis, The Figure Edward Grendon, With Folded Hands... by Jack Williamson, The Fires Within by Arthur C. Clarke, Zero Hour by Ray Bradbury, Hobbyist by Eric Frank Russell, Exit the Professor by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore, Thunder and Roses by Theodore Sturgeon, Don't Look Now by Henry Kuttner, He Walked Around the Horses by H. Beam Piper, The Strange case of John Kingman by Murray Leinster, That Only a Mother by Judith Merril, The Monster by A. E. Van Vogt, Dreams Are Sacred by Peter Phillips, Mars Is Heaven! by Ray Bradbury, Thang by Martin Gardner, Brooklyn Project by William Tenn, Ring Around the Redhead by John D. MacDonald, Period Piece by John R. Pierce (as by J. J. Coupling), Dormant by A. E. Van Vogt, In Hiding by WIlmar H. Shiras, Knock by Fredric Brown, A Child is Crying by John D. MacDonald and Late Night Final by Eric Frank Russell

Review:


The Winds of Change...and Other Stories

"In this new anthology, Isaac Asimov takes bits of earthly phenomena, trains his Promethean imaginative powers upon them, adds a generous helping of wit and dash of satire, and comes up with a shimmering collection of s.f. stories. Among them: "About Nothing" is a one-page tour de force. In A.D. 2125 the forecast of a black hole hurtling toward earth creates much ado among our future selves. "Belief" - A sudden, unwelcome talent for levitation has the opposite effect on its victim/beneficiary - until he stands his "air" and forces skeptics to rise to the challenge. "Death of a Foy" - From burlesque hoofers to silver screen caricatures, the Foy's long-running act has been extended here with a few modifications that a certain back-door johnny (Asimov) couldn't resist. "Good Taste" - On a planet saturated with gustatorial arbiters a renegade's ambrosial recipes whip the populace into an angry froth when they learn his special ingredient was the same used by wary Transylvanians. This is the first Asimov s.f. anthology since The Bicentennial Man and Other Stories."

Original Publication: Doubleday, March 1983
This Edition: Doubleday, March 1983
Cover Art: Kiyoshi Kanai
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


The Robots of Dawn

"A puzzling case of roboticide takes New York Detective Elijah Baley from Earth to the planet Aurora, where humans and robots have, till now, always coexisted in perfect harmony. Only the gifted roboticist Han Fastolfe had the means, the motive, and the opportunity to commit the crime - but Baley must prove the man innocent. For the murder of Jander Parnell is closely tied to a power struggle that will decide who will be the next interstellar pioneers in the universe. Armed only with his own instincts, his sometimes quirky logic and the immutable Three Laws of Robotics, Baley sets out to solve the case. but can anything prepare a simple Earthman for the psychological complexities of a world where a beautiful woman can easily have fallen in love with an all-too-humanrobot?"

Original Publication: Doubleday, October 1983
This Edition: Del Rey/Ballantine, November 1984
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy: Witches & Wizards

"Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy: Witches & Wizards brings two superb collections of stories together in one complete volume filled with two dozen marvelous tales of strange beings with terrifying powers that can be used for good - or for evil. The first volume, Witches, takes us from Colonial America to the witch world of Karres to a lovely estate where all the money in the world couldn't keep a terrifying prophecy from coming true. Here are tales that frighten and stories of magic used only for good.From demons and crones ready to prey upon the unsuspecting to "innocent" children weaving spells of incredible power to a place where incantation is a police detective's strongest weapon, these are adventures to bewitch your imagination as you enter the secret realm of witches, lured by such writers as Madeline L'Engle, Andre Norton, Poul Anderson, William Tenn, A.E. Van Vogt, and others. then it's on to the world of Wizards with stories that range from Atlantis to California, from the Orient to far-distant worlds - classical tales of wizardry used for nefarious and virtuous ends. From a sorcerers battle where a warlock's only ally is his werewolf to demons thirsting for the souls of victims and masters alike to Conan the Barbarian in a danger-filled contest with the forces of darkness, these are spellbinding journeys led by John Jakes, Ursula K. le Guin, Larry Niven, Jack Vance and a host of others. Isaac Asimov, who co-edited these volumes with Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh, also provides short and illuminating introductions to each section on the phenomena of witchery and wizardry, which will greatly add to the reader's pleasure. All in all, Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy: Witches and Wizards offers hours of good reading - chilling, funny, eerie, light-hearted, breathless - a perfect escape from your own day-to-day world into the deeper, darker realms of the "others.""

Original Publication: Bonanza Books/Crown Publishers, 1985
This Edition: Bonanza Books, Crown Publishers, 1985
Cover Art: Jacket painting by Romas/Mendola, Ltd.
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Co-edited with Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh. Contents: Witches and Wizards anthologies by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh.

Review:


The Early Asimov: Book One

"When a teenager named Isaac Asimov wasn't busy with school or working in the family store, he was writing. In this remarkable retrospective, Asimov takes us back to those early efforts, the inspirations, setbacks, and successes that were part and parcel of his mastering the writer's craft. Along with the stories themselves, his life in those first, exciting years as a writer struggling to make a name for himself in the world of science fiction is a remarkable tale in itself. Even in his first published story, the promise was there...The Callistan Menace - A classic stowaway tale in which scientific ingenuity, quick thinking, and a spunky kid save trapped spacemen from a gigantic Magnet Worm! A string of firsts...two in one story! Half-Breeds on Venus - Half-Martian, half-human, the Tweenies carve out a place for themselves among the telepathic amphibians of Venus. The Asimov touch and talent were apparent from the beginning...The Imaginary - When two of his students upset a critical experiment, only Psychologist Tan Porus can save his planet from a Draconian squid!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, September 1972
This Edition: Del Rey/Ballantine, 1986
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This volume is the 1st half of the original Doubleday edition plus commentary. Contents: The Callistan Menace, Ring Around the Dun, The Magnificent Possession, Trends, The Weapon Too Dreadful to Use, Black Friar of the Flame, Half-Breed, The Secret Sense, Homo Sol, Half-Breeds on Venus, The Imaginary, Heredity and History

Review:


Foundation and Earth

"Foundation.Foundation and Empire.Second Foundation.Foundation's Edge. It is a universal phenomenon. Forged from the singular imagination of SF master Isaac Asimov and critically revered around the world, the Foundation series is the most widely read science fiction work of all time. Now in a landmark publishing event, the monumental saga continues with Foundation and Earth, the fifth and most thrilling novel yet. Barely a millisecond has passed since the close of Foundation's Edge and Golan Trevize, former Councilman of the First Foundation, finds himself entrusted with an awesome task: to determine the very future of Galactic development. Rejecting the anarchy of a Galactic Empire built on the technology of the First Foundation, as well as that of an Empire based on the mentalics of the Second Foundation, Trevize chooses Gaia. The planet Gaia is a superorganism, a psychic confederation of peoples that finds its strength in mental unity. And merged with humankind, it will metamorphose into a supra-superorganism dedicated to the common good - a world Trevize Galaxia. But what instinctive force has led Trevize to this extraordinary concept - does it perhaps lie deep within the ancient history of another great world known as Earth? Trevize is compelled to learn the answer. Discovering that all reference to Earth is mysteriously missing from the Galactic Library at Trantor, he sets out in search of the "lost" planet. And as he and his companions, historian Janov Pelorat and the beautiful Gaian woman Bliss,travel from one forbidden world to the next, they face a daring and danger-filled odyssey that will decide the fate of the Empire - and humanity itself."

Original Publication: Doubleday, October 1986
This Edition: Doubleday, October 1986
Cover Art: Alan Wallerstein
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Also includes The Story Behind the "Foundation," an essay by Isaac Asimov

Review:


The Norby Chronicles

"It was just a dusty, old tin-can of a robot - with no guarantee. But Jeff only needed it to teach him Martian Colony Swahili before he got expelled from the Space Academy. Jeff Wells didn't really know what he had purchased. He didn't realize that the robot had been constructed by a genius half a century ago - from the salvaged parts of a damaged alien spacecraft. He didn't know about the robot's amazing technological skills - such as antigrav and a strange capacity for human emotions - among other things. Jeff Wells didn't really know what he was getting himself into"

Original Publication: Ace, April 1986
This Edition: Ace, April 1986
Cover Art: Barclay Shaw
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collection of stories that are part of the "Norby" series of children's science fiction tales created by Janet and Isaac Asimov. Contents: Norby, the Mixed Up Robot and Norby's Other Secret

Review:


Norby and the Queen's Necklace

"In the fifth book in the Norby Series, Norby's penchant for becoming mixed-up involves him and his owner/friend Jeff Wells with changing the course of history - altering events that led to the French Revolution. Focussing on the extravagant diamond-studded necklace made for Marie Antoinette (and said by some to have been one of the final excesses that brought about the uprising of the people of France and the storming of the Bastille), Janet and Isaac Asimov have created an adventure story with Norby, Jeff, Jeff's brother Fargo, and Fargo's girlfriend Albany Jones. The cast is transported back and forth through space and time into worlds - past and future - that tickle the imagination, leave the characters stranded, and almost bring about Norby's demise."

Original Publication: Walker & Co., December 1986
This Edition: Walker & Co., December 1986
Cover Art: Richard Rehbein
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Janet Asimov

Review:


The Currents of Space

"Rik had been psycho-probed and his memories destroyed. Now he was only a helpless field worker in the kyrt fields of Florina, where every human being was owned, body and soul, but the ruling world of Sark. But slowly his memories began to return. He knew he had once studied the thin currents of space and that some terrible danger threatened the sun of Florina and Sark. On Sark, the Ambassador of Trantor was searching for him and his dread knowledge. But the Squires of Sark wanted no warning to upset their wealth-producing monopoly on the sale of kyrt. Somehow, Rik must warn both worlds before all life was destroyed. But what could a serf do against the power of distant Sark?"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1952
This Edition: Del Rey/Ballantine, November 1985
Cover Art: Darrell K. Sweet
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Foundation

"The Galactic Empire had lasted for 12,000 years and ruled over a million planets. But now it was dying, Hari Selden, creator of the science for psychohistory, knew that its death would be followed by 30,000 years of brutal barbarism and savage warfare. To preserve knowledge and shorten the dark period to mere thousand years, Hari Selden set up the Encyclopedia Foundation and staffed it with the best scholars and scientists of the Empire. Then he placed it upon terminus, a bleak world at the edge of the galaxy. But now the empire was retreating, leaving the Foundation isolated and unprotected. Around it, little barbarian kingdoms were already beginning their wars in search of dominance. The Foundation knew itself as the only hope of mankind. But what could it do, alone and helpless, against the greed of the warlords who were reaching out to conquer and destroy it?"

Original Publication: Gnome Press, August 1951
This Edition: Ballantine, 1987
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collection of five short stories comprising Book #1 of the Foundation Trilogy. Contents: The Psychohistorians - first published in book form in 1951; The Encyclopedists - first published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1942 under the title Foundation; The Mayors - first published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1942 as Bridle and Saddle; The Traders - first published in 1944 in Astounding Science Fiction as The Wedge; The Merchant Princes - first published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1944 as The Big and the Little

Review:


Foundation and Empire

"When the Galactic Empire began dying, the great psychohistorian Hari Seldon set up the Foundation to preserve human culture and shorten 30,000 years of chaotic barbarism to a mere millennium. Located on a bleak world at the edge of the galaxy, it seemed helpless before the greed of neighboring warlords. But somehow, by science and wit, it had survived and even gained control of a small federation of planets. Yet it was still small. And against it stood the greatest power of all the huge power of the Empire, mighty even in decay. When an ambitious general turned an Imperial fleet toward the Foundation, the only hope lay in the prophecies of Hari Seldon. But even Hari Seldon could not predict the birth and mutant talent of the Mule one small man with power greater than a dozen battlefleets. Between big and little, the Foundation seemed doomed."

Original Publication: Gnome Press, 1952
This Edition: Del Rey, October 1987
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Two Novellas: The General - first published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1945 as Dead Hand and The Mule - first published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1945. Also, The Mule retrospectively won The Hugo Award in 1996 for Best Novel of 1945.

Review:


Second Foundation

"When the galactic empire died, the great psychohistorian Hari Delson set up the Foundation to preserve knowledge and lead men to a new empire after a thousand years. Now Seldon's plan seemed ended - ruined by the mutant mind power of the Mule. But there was a second foundation "at the other end of the galaxy." set up to protect the plan. The mule had failed to find it for the first time, but now he was sure he saw where it lay. The men of the Foundation also sought its location. Some of their finest minds were being dominated - and not by the Mule. They sought the Second Foundation to prevent its taking them over. They saw only one place where it could be. And young Arkade Darrell, fourteen years old and desperate with fear, knew she had discovered the terrible secret. Or had she?"

Original Publication: Gnome Press, May 1953
This Publication: Del Rey, October 1987
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Two Novellas: Search By the Mule, first published in 1948 as Now You See it- in Astounding Science Fiction and Search by the Foundation, first published in 1949-1950 in Astounding Science Fiction as -And Now You Don't

Review:


Foundation's Edge

"Hari Seldon, the greatest psychohistorian, set up the Foundation to bypass millennia of barbarism and bring about a Second Empire in a mere thousand years. Now, 498 years after its founding, the Foundation seemed to be following the Seldon Plan perfectly. Too perfectly, Golan Trevize was sure. Such perfection was impossible after the unpredictable disaster of the Mule - unless the supposedly destroyed Second Foundation was still controlling humanity. But his attempts to warn others had led only to his exile in space. Stor Gendibal of the Second Foundation was also worried by that perfection and suspected tampering by an even greater power. Now he, too, had been sent into space to trace the strange mission of Trevize. Behind both came the warships of the Foundation, risking holocaust to utilize whatever trevize had found. He had found an impossible planet with even more impossible powers. Events had gone far beyond the Seldon Plan. And only Trevize could save the Plan or destroy it forever."

Original Publication: Doubleday, September 1982
This Edition: Del Rey, April 1988
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

This novel became Asimov's first The New York Times best-seller. It also was nominated for the 1982 Nebula Award for Best Novel and won the 1983 Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Review:


Prelude to Foundation

"Wit, wisdom, and an uncanny sense of wonder have become the bestselling trademarks of grandmaster Isaac Asimov. Each of his works has marked a new milestone in science fiction literature. But none has shaped the very future of science fiction more than his Foundation series. Beginning with the phenomenal Foundation and continuing with Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation, Foundation's Edge and Foundation and Earth, this monumental and classic saga already has sold well over six million copies. Now, in an anxiously awaited publishing event, Isaac Asimov once again fashions science fiction's future by going back to when it all began...presenting the overture to the greatest SF series of all time, the newest Foundation book, Prelude to Foundation. It is the year 12,120 G.E. and Emperor Cleon, First of that Name, sits uneasily on the Imperial throne. Here on Trantor, the great multi-domed capital of the Galactic Empire, forty billion people have created a civilization of unimaginable technological and cultural complexity. It is a world so intricately woven that pulling one thread would unravel it all. Cleon I is unnerved by this, for he knows there are those who would see him fall - those he cannot touch. If only he had knowledge of what lay ahead, then the Empire truly could be his. When young Hari Seldon arrives on Trantor, he is unaware of the perilous politics that are brewing. The thirty-two-year-old Outworld mathematician has come simply to attend the Decennial COnvention and do a bit of sightseeing. But when he presents his paper on psychohistory, his remarkable theory of prediction, little does Hari realize that he has sealed his fate and determined the destiny of humanity. For Hari Seldon possesses the prophetic power that is so desired by the Emperor. And now suddenly, Heliconian has become the most wanted man in the Empire as he desperately struggles to keep his portentous theory from reaching the wrong hands...while forging the key to the future - a power to be known as the Foundation."

Original Publication: Doubleday Foundation, May 1988
This Edition: Doubleday Foundation, May 1988
Cover Art: Boris Vallejo
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


Beginnings: The Story of Origins - of Mankind, Life, the Earth, the Universe

"A Spellbinding 15-billion-year journey through the universe. How did the universe originate? What caused sea creatures to evolve into land creatures? When and how did the moon emerge? Where did the first human civilizations appear? Who was the first human being to fly, long before the Wright brothers? BEGNIINGS Here is a wondrous excursion through 15 billion years of human and prehuman history by America's most popular and exciting science writer, Isaac Asimov. From the flashing birth of the universe to planetary systems, from algae to reptiles, Asimov covers the infinite and microscopic in rich detail. Even if you've never known the difference between a proton and a neutron or a nebulae and a dwarf star, Beginnings makes it all abundantly clear - and absolutely fascinating."

Original Publication: Walker & Co, November 1987
This Edition: Berkley, May 1989
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Martian Way and Other Stories

"The Martian Way - Isolationists on Earth were cutting off supplies to the colonies, and there was no earthly way the Spacers could curvive without water. But young Ted Long had an idea - a real long shot Youth - Red and Slim figured they's join the circus with the two small, strange animals they'd found. They didn't realize that their fathers were waiting anxiously for alien emissaries, now overdue...The Deep - Roi's mission was vital to the very survival of his alien species. But to succeed, he must face an ordeal his race considered obscene - mothering...Sucker Bait - The planet Troas seemed a paradise, but it was a killer. The Confederation sent a team of scientists - and a strange teenager with a perfect memory - to unravel the planet's mystery before it could kill again."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1955
This Edition: Ballantine, 1989
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Martian Way, Youth, The Deep and Sucker Bait

Review:


The Ugly Little Boy

"The Ugly Little Boy - She hurried to Timmie, who clung to her, curling his little bandy legs - still thin, so thin - about her. Hoskins watched, then said gravely, "He seems quite unhappy." Miss Fellows said, "I don't blame him. They're at him every day now with their blood samples and their probings. They keep him on synthetic diets that I wouldn't feed a pig." "It's the sort of thing they can't try on a human, you know." "They can't try it on Timmie either. After he's had a bad session with them, he has nightmares, he can't sleep. NOW I WARN YOU" (she reached a sudden peak of fury) "I'm not letting them in there any more." The Widget, The Wadget, and Boff - Special entry in field expedition [notebook]: Since it is now [my] intention to prefer charges against [my][partner-teammate] [Smith] and to use these [notes] as a formal [document] in the matter, [I] shall now summarize in detail the particulars of the case: [We} have been on Earth for [expression of time-units] on a field expedition to determine whether or not the dominant species here possesses the Synapse known to our [catalog] as Beta sub Sixteen, the master [computer] [at home] having concluded that without the Synapse, this Earth culture must become extinct. On arrival [we] set up the usual [detectors], expecting to get our information in a [expression of very short time-unit] or so; but to our [great astonishment] the readings on the [kickshaw], the [gimmick] and the high-sensitivity [snivvy] were mixed; it appears that this culture possessed the Synapse but did not use it [!!!] [I] submit that [Smith] is guilty of carelessness and [unethical] conduct. [I] see no solution but to destroy this specimen and perhaps the others. [I] declare that this situation has arisen because [Smith] ignored [my] clearly [stated] warning. As [I] [write], this altered, frightened specimen stands ready to commit violence on [our] [equipment] and thereby itself. [I] hereby serve notice on [Smith] that [he] got [us] into this and [he] can [ ]ing well get [us] out."

Original Publication: Tor Double, June 1989
This Edition: Tor Double, June 1989
Cover Art: The Ugly Little Boy by Alan Gutierrez - The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff by Carol Russo
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Tor Double published with The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff by Theodore Sturgeon. The Ugly Little Boy first appeared in Galaxy in September of 1958 under the title of Lastborn and was later reprinted in Nine Tomorrows

Review:


The Complete Stories Volume 1

"For the legions of Isaac Asimov fans who have been enjoying his short fiction for over half a century, but just can't keep up with the Good Doctor's prolific appearances in print, here is the definitive Asimov collection. This volume, first in a series of handsome collectors' editions, contains 46 science fiction stories - many now classics of the genre. As Dr. Asimov points out in his Introduction, many also hold a personal meaning for him, including, "The Last Question" (his favorite short story of all), "The Ugly Little Boy" (his third favorite, a real heart-tugger), "sally" (which reveals his true feelings about automobiles), and "Nightfall," which readers and the Science Fiction Writers of America have voted the best science fiction story of all time. By turns erudite and fanciful, provocative and just plain fun, the stories collected here illustrate the rich diversity of Iassc Asimov's remarkable talent. To read any of them is to understand immediately his enormous and ever expanding popularity. To have them gathered in a single collection is welcome and long-overdue treat for all lovers of science fiction, be they long-time Asimov fans or readers just discovered his imaginative new worlds for the first time."

Original Publication: Doubleday, November 1990
This Edition: Doubleday, November 1990
Cover Art: Barclay Shaw
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Dead Past, The Foundation of S.F. Success, Franchise, Gimmicks Three, Kid Stuff, The Watery Place, Living Space, The Message, Satisfaction Guaranteed, Hell-Fire, The Last Trump, The Fun They Had, Jokester, The Immortal Bard, Someday, The Author's Ordeal, Dreaming is a Private Thing, Profession, The Feeling of Power, The Dying Night, I'm in Marsport Without Hilda, The Gentle Vultures, All the Troubles of the World, Spell My Name with an S, The Last Question, The Ugly Little Boy, Nightfall, Green Patches, Hostess, Breeds There a Man...?, The C-Chute, "In a Good Cause -", What If..., Sally, Flies, "Nobody Here But-", Strikebreaker, Insert Knob A in Hole B, The Up-to-Date Sorcerer, Unto the Fourth Generation, What Is This Thing Called Love?, The Machine That Won the War, My Son, the Physicist!, Eyes Do More Than See, Segregationist, I Just Make Them Up, See! and Rejection Slips by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Azazel Fantasy Stories

"He's two centimeters tall. He's fiery red. He has magical powers strong enough to wreck a normal human's life.all with the best intentions, of course. George Bitternut, an eccentric linguist and deadbeat, stumbles onto an ancient incantation that calls forth this diminutive demon of astonishing wizardry. Unfortunately, Azazel refuses to do anything for George's personal gain - but he agrees to help out a few of his friends. WIth Dr. Asimov himself as eager audience, George recounts eighteen episodes of life with Azazel - disastrous, hilarious episodes that could only spring from science fiction's most fertile imagination."

Original Publication: Doubleday, November 1988
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, February 1990
Cover Art: Robert Goldstrum
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Two-Centimeter Demon, One Night of Song, The Smile that Loses, To the Victor, The Dim Rumble, Saving Humanity, A Matter of Principle, The Evil Drink Does, Writing Time, Dashing Through the Snow, Logic is Logic, He Travels the Fastest, The Eye of the Beholder, More Things in Heaven and Earth, The Mind's Construction, The Fights of Spring, Galatea and Flight of Fancy by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Robot Visions

"Here, from the writer whose name is synonymous with robots and the science of robotics, are five decades of robot visions gathered together in one volume. These 36 landmark short stories and essays include there never before collected stories: "Too Bad," "Christmas Without Rodney," and "Robot Visions," which was created specifically for this book. And you will meet all of Isaac Asimov's technological children from Robbie, the very first robot that ASimov's imagination brought to life, to Susan Calvin, the original robot psychologist, Stephen Byerley, the humanoid robot, and the famous human/robot detective team of Lije Bailey and R. Daneel Olivaw, the stars of so many best-selling novels. Let the master himself be your guide as you explore the key moments in the fictional history of robot-human relations - from the most primitive computers and mobile machines to the first tobor to become a man. And you will see these "robot visions" skillfully captures in illustrations by Academy Award-winner Ralph McQuarrie, production deisnger of Star Wars."

Original Publication: Roc, April 1990
This Edition: Roc/New American Library, March 1991
Cover Art: Ralph McQuarrie
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Robot Visions, Too Bad! Robbie, Reason, Liar!, Runaround, Evidence, Little Lost Robot, The Evitable Conflict, Feminine Intuition, The Bicentennial Man, Someday, Think!, Segregationist, Mirror Image, Lenny, Galley Slave, Christmas Without Rodney, Robots I Have Known, The New Teachers, Whatever You Wish, The Friends We Make, Our Intelligent Tools, The Laws of Robotics, Future Fantastic, The Machine and the Robot, The New Profession, The Robot As Enemy?, Intelligences Together, My Robots, The Laws of Humanics, Cybernetic Organism, The Sense of Humor and Robots in Combination

Review:


Nightfall

"The planet Kalgash is on the brink of chaos - but only a handful of people realize it. Kalgash knows only the perpetual light of day; for more than two millennia, some combination of its six suns has lit up the sky. But twilight is now gathering. Soon the suns will set all at once - and the terrifying splendor of Nightfall will call forth a madness that signals the end of civilization. Isaac Asimov's short story "Nightfall" first appeared in 1941. It has since become recognized as a classic, its author a legend. But the short story isn't the whole story. Now, Dr. Asimov has teamed with multiple Hugo and Nebula Award winner Robert Silverberg to explore and expand one of the most awe-inspiring concepts in the history of science fiction. In this novel, you will witness Nightfall - and much more. You will learn what happens at Daybreak."

Original Publication: Gollancz, June 1990
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, September 1991
Cover Art: Don Dixon
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Robert Silverberg.

Review:


The Complete Stories Volume 2

"For over 50 years, Isaac Asimov has been transforming the face of science fiction with star-blazing stories of time and space. "A professor invents a time machine and goes back to the pat to discover what really happened to the dinosaurs." His novels and stories have made the Good Doctor's name a household word, and many of them have inspired research which has led to breakthroughs in robotics and other fields of scientific investigation. "He was a shoo-in for Mayor - until someone started spreading the rumor that he was a robot, not a man." with hundreds of short stories in print, it's not easy for Isaac Asimov's innumerable devoted fans to keep track of all his work. "It was freshman hazing the humans would never forget, complete with what might be a one-way space flight to a world peopled by savages." So Doubleday has come up with a way of insuring that readers do not miss even one of the master's inventions - by consolidating all of them into a definitive multivolume set. "Can an ordinary monkey recreate the works of Shakespeare - or a science fiction writer's latest masterpiece?" This second volume in the series includes 40 polished gems gathered together from a wide variety of sources. "The Jovians had sworn to destroy the human race - as soon as they found a way to escape the prison of their own atmosphere." Among them you'll find the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning "The Bicentennial Man," as well as classic tales of robots and the celebrated robophychologist Susan Calvin, stories of First Contacts with alien civilizations, and mus more of the quintessential Asimov."

Original Publication: Foundation/Doubleday, February 1992
This Edition: Foundation/Doubleday, February 1992
Cover Art: Barclay Shaw
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Not Final!, The Hazing, Death Sentence, Blind Alley, Evidence, The Red Queen's Race, Day of the Hunters, The Deep, The Martian Way, The Monkey's Finger, The Singing Bell, The Talking Stone, Each an Explorer, Let's Get Together, Pate de Foie Gras, Galley Slave, Lenny, A Loint of Paw, A Statue for Father, Anniversary, Obituary, Rain, Rain Go Away, Star Light, Founding Father, The Key, The Billiard Ball, Exile to Hell, Key Item, Feminine Intuition, The Greatest Asset, Mirror Image, Take a Match, Light Verse, Stranger in Paradise, That Thou Art Mindful of Him, The Life and Times of Multivac, The Bicentennial Man, Marching In, Old-Fashioned and The Tercentenary Incident all by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Gold: The Final Science Fiction Collection

"Gold is Isaac Asimov's first original collection of science fiction in over a decade. It is also his last science fiction collection, one containing all of his uncollected Sf stories that have never before appeared in book form. Here is the final and crowning achievement of the fifty-year career of science fiction's transcendent genius, the world-famous author who defined the field of SF for its practitioners, for its millions of readers, and for the world at large. The stories here collected for the first time range from the humorous to the profound, for Asimov was engaged until the end of his days in the world of redefining and expanding the boundaries of the literature he loved and, indeed, helped create. Gold also contains Asimov's previously uncollected writings about the craft of science fiction, a treasure trove of practical advice and hard-won wisdom from one of the world's most prolific authors. In addition, Gold contains selected and previously uncollected essays about science fiction itself, as the Grand Master writes on his own innovations such as psychohistory and robotics, and looks toward the future of the field. But the soul of this final collection is the fiction, and at its heart is the title story, Gold, a moving and revealing drama about a writer who fambled everything on a change at immortality - a gamble Asimov himself made. And won."

Original Publication: HarperPrism, March 1995
This Edition: HarperPrism, March 1995
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Fault-Intolerant, Kid Brother, The Smile of the Chipper, Gold, Left to Right, Cal, Frustration, Hallucination, The Instability, Alexander the God, In the Canyon, Good-bye to Earth, Battle-Hymn, Feghoot and the Courts, The Nations in Space, Religion and Science Fiction, The Longest Voyate, Inventing a Universe, Flying Saucers and Science Fiction, Invasion, The Science Fiction Blowgun, The Robot Chronicles, Golden Age Ahead, The All-Human Galaxy, Psychohistory, Science Fiction Series, Survivors, Nowhere!, Outsiders, Insiders, Science Fiction Anthologies, The Influence of Science Fiction, Women and Science Fiction, Time-Travel, Plotting, Metaphor, Ideas, Serials, The Name of Our Field, Hints, Writing for Young People, Names, Originality, Book Reviews, What Writers Go Through, Revisions, Irony, Plagiarism, Symbolism, Prediction, Best-Seller, Pseudonyms and Dialog all by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Out of the Everywhere

"Have you ever wondered when and how humanity came to exist or what it is that makes humans different than other two-legged creatures? Or how a compass unerringly determines where North lies? These questions have occurred to Isaac Asimov, and with his scientific genius and master storytelling skills he has answered these and many more. The problems of overpopulation, the need for alternate fuels, the fear of radiation - Asimov tackles subjects that are pertinent to our everyday lives with penetrating insight and factual knowledge. Not even time is safe from attack as Asimov breaks down the "unforgiving minute" into millisecond pulsars. The undisputed dean of popular science, Isaac Asimov once again entertains as he enlightens in this wonderfully engaging exploration of the world around us."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1990
This Edition: Pinnacle, 1992
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: A Sacred Poet, The Very Error of the Moon, Asking the Right Question, The Road to Humanity, Standing Tall, The Unrecognized Danger, The Radiation That Wasn't, Iron, Cold Iron, From Pole to Pole, Is Anyone Listening?, The Longest River, The Fire of Life, The Slave of the Lamp, The Horse Under the Hood, Out of the Everywhere, Into the Here and The Unforgiving Minute by Isaac Asimov

Review:


Magic: The Final Fantasy Collection

"Isaac Asimov and science fiction are one and the same to millions of readers. He was the field's transcendent genius, its reigning prophet, its genial patriarch, and its most prolific author. But Asimov also wrote fantasy, and invariably of an enduring quality. Magic is his final original collection, containing all of his uncollected fantasy stories that have never before appeared in book form. In addition, this farewell collection of Asimov's writings also includes his thoughts on the genre of fantasy itself. Here are the fascinating musings of a wide-ranging intelligence, discussing everything from Tolkien to Spielberg, from unicorns to King Arthur, from the differences between maidens and damsels to the speed of Seven League Boot - scientifically calculated at last!"

Original Publication: Voyager/HarperCollins, 1996
This Edition: HarperPrism, April 1997
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Baby, It's Cold Outside, Concerning Tolkien, Dear Judy-Lynn, Extraordinary Voyages, Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Giants in the Earth, Ignorance in America, In Days of Old, It's a Job, Knock Plastic!, Look Long Upon a Monkey, Lost in Non-Translation, Magic, March Against the Foe, Northwestward, Prince Delightful and the Flameless Dragon, Reading and Writing, Sword and Sorcery, The Critic on the Hearth, The Fable of Three Princes, The Mad Scientist, The Reluctant Critic, The Right Answer, The Time Traveler, The Unicorn, Thinking about Thinking, To Your Health, Unknown, When Fantasy Became Fantasy and Wine is a Mocker

Review:


Forward the Foundation

"For nearly fifty years, Isaac Asimov thrilled millions of readers with his internationally bestselling Foundation series, a spell-binding tale of the future that spans hundreds of years and dozens of worlds. Here, now, is Forward the Foundation, the seventh and final volume of the series. Completed just before his death, it is the Grand Master's last gift to his legions of admirers. Here, at last, is the story Asimov fans have been waiting for, an exciting tale of danger, intrigue, and suspense that chronicles the second half of hero Hari Seldon's life has he struggles to perfect his revolutionary Theory of Psychohistory and establish the means by which the survival of humanity will be ensured: Foundation. For, as Seldon and his loyal band of followers know, the mighty Galactic Empire is crumbling, and its inevitable destruction will wreak havoc Galaxy-wide...A resounding tour de force, Forward the Foundation brings full circle Asimov's renowned Foundation epic. It is the crowning achievement of a great writer's life, and a stunning testament to the creative genius of Isaac Asimov."

Original Publication: Doubleday, April 1993
This Edition: Doubleday, April 1993
Cover Art: Bob Larkin
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


Asimov's Mysteries

"13 incredible tales by the incomparable master of science fiction: The Singing Bell - an intergalactic criminal steals treasured, musical lunar artifacts. The Talking Stone - A spaceship crew is planning on some illegal uranium mining with the help of an intelligent creature made of rock. What's in a Name? - Everything. Especially when twin librarians are involved in a murder. Pate De Foie Gras - Just how did that good lay the golden egg? Also included in the collection are: The Dying Night, The Dust of Death, A Loint of Paw, I'm in Marsport Without Hilda, Marooned Off Vesta and Anniversary, Obituary, Star Light, THe Key, and The Billiard Ball."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1968
This Edition: Fawcett Crest, Date Unknown
Cover Art: Ann Dalton
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction, The Singing Bell, The Talking Stone, What's in a Name?, The Dying Night, Pate de Foie Gras, The Dust of Death, A Point of Paw, I'm in Marsport Without Hilda, Marooned Off Vesta, Anniversary, Obituary, Star Light, The Key and The Billiard Ball

Review:

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