John W. Campbell

John Wood Campbell Jr. was born in New Jersey in 1910. Principally he is remembered as the editor of Analog Science Fiction, but before this important role he was also an author in his own right. He wrote primarily under his own name as well as Don A. Stuart. He passed away in 1971, at age 61. A more detailed biography can be found in the Articles section.

The Moon is Hell

"Within ten years - fifteen, perhaps - the events portrayed so skillfully in this novel may be prosaic fact. Even today the idea of flight to the Moon no longer seems beyond the bounds of possibility; and with further research with rocket propulsion it appears certain that a Lunar flight will be attempted. "The Moon is Hell!" is the dramatic record of the first expedition to land on the moon - with no apparent hope of returning. Stranded - on a frozen, hostile world. This is the day-to-day record of thirteen men, scientists from Earth, in their conflict with the Moon - and with their own natures under pressure. Its a grim story, amazingly real, so convincingly portrayed that in imagination you will join the thirteen in their explorations amid the jagged craters, the dust shrouded plains of our satellite. You will sympathize with them in their efforts to wrest food and water and air from the arid, airless world. You will live the life they live. In short, you will enjoy this story from beginning to end. Truly, in "The Moon is Hell!" John W Campbell, Jr., has written a masterpiece of mature science fiction. You will remember this fascinating novel for a long time to come. It appears here for the first time, never having been published before in any form. In marked contrast with "The Moon is Hell!", the concluding novelette in this volume can be best described as a philosophical fantasy. Lest that mislead you, it is first of all a story, an exciting story of another world, a tale of gods and men - men who feared neither death nor life. But its more than that. In a world oppressed with so much of nerve tension, neurosis and stark madness, it would seem that some such study of the mind as is suggested in "The Elder Gods" might be of great help to mankind in general. We know a bit about material things; we know, so very little about our own minds. Campbell, in "The Elder Gods," opens to your fascinated gaze some of the possibilities latent in pure mentality. A double portion - entertainment and a thought-stimulant in one volume."

Original Publication: Fantasy, 1951
This Edition: Fantasy, 1951
Cover Art: Hannes Bok (No dust jacket)
Format: Hardback

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The Black Star Passes

"One of the greatest names in science-fiction is that of John W. Campbell. Famed as the editor of Astounding Science Fiction, now Analog, John W. Campbell was earlier known for his exciting, imaginative novels of super-science, which placed his name alongside such greats as Edward E. Smith and Edmond Hamilton. The Black Star Passes is such a book, narrating the adventures of the Earth scientists Arcot, Wade and Morey as they fight at first for the freedom of their planet and then for the safety of the entire solar system. For cosmic scope, daring concepts, and sweeping adventure, it has never been surpassed."

Original Publication: Fantasy, 1953
This Edition: Ace, 1965
Cover Art: Jerome Podwil
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction, Piracy Preferred, Solarite and The Black Star Passes all by John W. Campbell. Interior Artwork by Jack Gaughan.

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The Planeteers

"Here are five adventures in planetary exploration capable of orbiting the most Earthbound reader. You will find yourself embroiled in interplanetary riddles as pioneer space rovers Penton and Blake pit their wits against five alien species. Into the fray come an array of otherworld creatires - invisible ships, super-evolved blobs, and an amazing tribe of human chameleons. Watch, for instance, how the adventurers from Earth use their cunning to escape death from the "spinning shleath" who ooze their unpleasant slime into every crack and crevice of their planet. The Planeteers is high space adventure - an action-packed series of Solar System explorations written in John W. Campbell's classic days."

Original Publication: Ace, 1966
This Edition: Ace, 1966
Cover Art: Jack Gaughan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Planeteers, The Brain Stealers of Mars, The Double Minds, The Immortality Seekers, The Tenth World and The Brain Pirates. Ace Double #G-585 with The Ultimate Weapon, also by John W. Campbell.

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The Ultimate Weapon

"The star Mira was unpredictable variable. Sometimes it was blazing, brilliant and hot. Other times it was oddly dim, cool, shedding little warmth on its many planets. Gresth Gkaw, leader of the Mirans, was seeking a better star, one to which is "people" could migrate. That star had to be steady, reliable, with a good planetary system. And in his astronomical searching he found Sol. WIth hundreds of ships, each larger than whole Terrestrial spaceports, and traveling faster than the speed of light, the Mirans set out to move in to Solar regions and take over. And on Earth there was nothing which would be capable of beating off this incredible armade - until Buck Kendall stumbled upon The Ultimate Weapon."

Original Publication: Ace, 1966
This Edition: Ace, 1966
Cover Art: Gerald McConnell
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Ace Double #G-585 with The Planeteers, also by John W. Campbell.

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