Groff Conklin

Groff Conklin was born on September 6, 1904 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. He was educated at Dartmouth and Harvard and eventually graduated from Columbia University in 1927. His career was eclectic, having worked for government agencies, in public relations and as a book editor. He is best known however for being a science fiction anthologist. Having edited more than 40 anthologies of science fiction, he is considered the most important science fiction anthologist. According to Bud Webster, author of 41 Above the Rest: An Index and Checklist for the Anthologies of Groff Conklin, ""his contribution over the period of two decades was irreplaceable and all of our postwar history exists in the penumbra of his work." Groff Conklin died on July 19, 1968, age 64.

Great Science Fiction About Doctors

"When the medical mind takes off on a flight of fancy (or fantasy), watch out! The results, as these eighteen tales show, can be chillingly plausible or tantalizingly irrational. Represented in this anthology are a number of practicing physicians - including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (M.D.!) - as well as such well-known science fictioneers as Arthur C. Clarke, C.M. Kornbluth, and Murray Leinster, and such classical writers as Poe and Hawthorne. Some of the stories ("The Man Without an Appetite" and "family Resemblance") are lighthearted. Some ("The Little Black Bag" and "A Matter of Ethics") are biting. Some ("Rappacini's Daughter" and "The Brothers") are ghoulish. All are compelling, and all project a sometimes titillating, sometimes macabre, but always incisive view of the far-out worlds of medicine. The editors prescribe this collection for the fun of it: to relax tensions and expand the imagination. But if you come across some provocative, serious ideas, don't be startled - science fiction is full of such intriguing surprises."

Original Publication: Collier Books, 1963
This Edition: Collier Books, 1966
Cover Art: Don Punchatz
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Written with Noah D. Fabricant, M.D.

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Science Fiction Oddities

"Here is the most unusual collection of science fiction stories ever tobe put between two covers. Each one of the nineteen stories included has been selected so as to give you an experience as curious as it is fascinating - science fiction with as odd little twist such as you've never known it before."

Original Publication: Berkley Medallion, November 1966
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, November 1966
Cover Art: Don Punchatz
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: People Soup by Alan Arkin, What is This Thing Called Love? by Isaac Asimov, Callahan and the Wheelies by Stephen Barr, Mrs. Poppledore's Id by Reginald Bretnor, The Teeth of Despair by Avram Davidson and Sidney Klein, The Galactic Calabash by G.C. Edmondson, Space-Crime Continuum by H. F. Ellis, The Chessplayers by Charles L. Harness, What's the Name of That Town? by R. A. Lafferty, Rump-Titty-Titty-Tum-TAH-Tee by Fritz Leiber, Rundown by Robert Lory, The Trouble with H.A.R.R.I. by Edward Mackin, The Water Eater by Winston K. Marks, A Pride of Carrots by Robert Nathan, The Terra-Venusian War of 1979 by Gerard E. Neyroud, The Coffin Cure by Alan E. Nourse, On Camera by John Novotny, See No Evil by John R. Pierce and Punch by Frederik Pohl

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Science Fiction Terror Tales

"In this collection of terrifying tales, you will read about Robert Cox, a man who could remember only his name. That was all they'd let him remember. About a weird visitor from outer space who had no name, but did have an insatiable hunger. About ordinary men on strange planets, and strange men on our own planet. and about what is perhaps the greatest terror of all...the hidden truth about yourself."

Original Publication: Gnome Press, January 1955
This Edition: Pocket, September 1969
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Punishment Without Crime by Ray Bradbury, Arena by Fredric Brown, The Leech by Robert Sheckley, Through Channels by Richard Matheson, Lost Memory by Peter Phillips, Memorial by Theodore Sturgeon, Prott by Margaret St. Clair, Flies by Isaac Asimov, The Microscopic Giants by Paul Ernst, The Other Inaugration by Anthony Boucher, Nightmare Brother by Alan E. Nourse, Pipeline to Pluto by Murray Leinster, Imposter by Philip K. Dick, They by Robert A. Heinlein and Let Me Live in a House by Chad Oliver

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Five-Odd

"Encounter the bizarre perils of time future.Five-odd.a winning combination of leading fantastic-ists presents a dazzling flight into the future.five superb short novels probe the terrifying possibilities that await man in strange worlds and other eons.five masters chart a nightmare voyage in the unknown regions of space..."

Original Publication: Pyramid Books, August 1964
This Edition: Pyramid Books, June 1971
Cover Art: Ron Walotsky
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Dead Past by Isaac Asimov, Something Strange by Kingsley Amis, Unit by J. T. McIntosh, Gone Fishing by James H. Schmitz and Big Ancestor by F. L. Wallace

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50 Short Science Fiction Tales

"You visit a world where Robots strain to remember the existence of the Men who created them; hear the tantalizingly brief report of a man who returns from a trip to the future; see the snake-armed Thing that emerges from the minds of the people who conjure it. You meet a souvenir hunter in the Thirtieth Century and a schoolgirl who tries to cope with the teaching methods of the Twenty-second Century. You share the terror of an astronaut in a "haunted" space suit and the dilemma of a wife whose husband knows a common chemical formula for destroying the earth. In short, you feel the impact, the originality, and the uncanny atmosphere created by these science fiction experts not once - but fifty times. Fifty Short Science Fiction Tales have ben selected for their concise writing, and for punch lines that leave the reader "surprised, shocked, and delighted at the final sentence." According to the editors, another important aspect of this literary form is "evocation of a background differing from our own." Consequently, though some of the stories are just a page long, the reading experience is always excitingly unique."

Original Publication: Collier, February 1963
This Edition: Collier, 1973
Cover Art: Don Ivan Punchatz
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Editorial Collaboration with Isaac Asimov. Contents: Ballade of an Artificial Satellite by Poul Anderson, The Fun They Had by Isaac Asimov, Men Are Different Alan Bloch, The Ambassadors by Anthony Boucher, The Weapon by Fredric Brown, Random Sample by T. P. Caravan, Oscar by Cleve Cartmill, The Mist by Peter Grainger (as by Peter Cartur), Teething Ring by James Causey, The Haunted Space Suit by Arthur C. Clarke (Variant of Who's There?), Stair Trick by Mildren Clingerman, Unwelcome Tenant by Roger Dee, The Mathematicians by Arthur Frelman, The Third Level by Jack Finney, Beautiful, Beautiful, Beautiful! by Stuart Friedman, The Figure by Edward Grendon, The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wollheim (as by Donald Grinnell), The Good Providor by Marion Gross, Columbus Was a Dope by Robert A. Heinlein, Texas Week by Albert Hernhuter, Hilda by H. B. Hickey, The Choice by Wayland Hilton-Young (as by W. Hilton-Young), Not With a Bang by Damon Knight, The Alter at Midnight by C. M. Kornbluth, A Bad Day for Sales by Fritz Leiber, Who's Cribbing? by Jack Lewis, Spectator Sport by John D. MacDonald, The Cricket Ball by Avro Manhattan, Double-Take by Winston K. Marks, Prolog by John P. McKnight, The Available Data on the Worp Reaction by Lion Miller, Narapoia by Alan Nelson, Tiger by the Tail by Alan E. Nourse, Counter Charm by Peter Phillips, The Fly by Arthur Porges, The Business, As Usual by Mack Reynolds, Two Weeks in August by Frank M. Robinson, See? by Edward G. Robles, Jr., Appointment at Noon by Eric Frank Russell, We Don't Want Any Trouble by James H. Schmitz, Built Down Logically by Howard Schoenfeld, A Egg a Month from All Over by Margaret St. Clair (as by Idris Seabright), The Perfect Woman by Robert Sheckley, The Hunters by Walt Sheldon, The Martian and the Magician by Evelyn E. Smith, Barney by Will Stanton, Talent by Theodore Sturgeon, Project Hush by William Tenn, Emergency Landing by Ralph Williams, Obviously Suicide by S. Fowler Wright and Six Haiku by Karen Anderson

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Omnibus of Science Fiction

"Everything has its heyday, the period of time when it blossoms forth, unstoppable and incomparable. For science fiction, this book is the heyday collection, a new American phenomenon finding out just how important it's going to be, and enjoying every minute of a new freedom. So many breakthroughs had come about so quickly during the war that radical change became a way of life. This was the time of a new science fiction magazine was a month, fan clubs and conventions. Escapism became an industry, and a vital force in people's imaginations. The world of tomorrow was at hand, and it fascinated and terrified us. Science fiction gave shape to the dreams, and the dreamers are here in this book, reigning supreme. The most striking fact about those perfect little stories is their relevance to today. Theodore Sturgeon's "Never Underestimate..." is about a sexist scientist's attempt to muzzle woman's controlling sexual powers over men, through a nuclear bomb test. Asimov's "Homo Sol" contains ethnic jokes...about humanoids. ("What of Kraut's Law...which says you can't panic more than five humanoids at a time?") John MacDonald makes it impossible for the reader to ever again indulge lightly in the twenty-fourth century's substitute for life and freedom: a future as the television hero of one's choice. However, Arthur C. Clarke, in 1949, couldn't predict how early we'd be parking on the moon! In his short masterpiece, "History Lesson," a piece of metal on a mahogany stand bears a silver plate with the inscription: "Auxiliary Igniter from Starboard Jet Spaceship 'Moving Star' Earth-Moon, A.D. 1985." Then there are the wonderfully orchestrated sci-fi surprised: "The scientists lay half in the water, their beautiful reptilian bodies gleaming in the sunlight." Now imagine those same scientific visitors to an ice-bound earth watching the only indication of what humans looked like...from a Mickey Mouse movie! In "The Scarlet Plague," written in 1913, Jack London seems to predict the onslaught of polio, with amazing accuracy. What, then, of the other predictions of these masterful minds? Will we be reduced, finally, to stone-age rubble? Will some of us be lost in space, able only to rehash old arguments over radios that transmit over ten thousand miles? This book fascinates a compels as few others do. As R. Scott Latham says in his foreword: "No concept was taboo, no style too experimental, no notion too perilous to explore. It was a heady, exhilarating time." With this book in hand, it still is. So sit back and open it, perhaps with a story such as "Homo Sol," with its classic sci-fi beginning: "The seven thousand and fifty-fourth session of the Galactic Congress sat in solemn conclave in the vast semi-circular hall on Eron, second planet of Arcturus.""

Original Publication: Crown, November 1952
This Edition: Bonanza Books/Crown Publishers
Cover Art: Eddie Jones
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Foreword by R. Scott Latham, Introduction by Groff Conklin, John Thomas's Cube by John Leimert, Hyperpelosity by L. Sprague de Camp, The Thing in the Woods by Fletcher Pratt, And Be Merry... by Katherine MacLean, The Bees from Borneo by Will H. Gray, The Rag Thing by Donald A. Wollheim (as by David Grinnell), The Conqueror by Mark Clifton, Never Underestimate by Theodore Sturgeon, The Doorbell by David H. Keller, A Subway Named Mobius by A. J. Deutsch, Backfire by Ross Rocklynne, The Box by James Blish, Zeritsky's Law by Ann Warren Griffith, The Fourth Dynasty by R.R. Winterbotham, The Color Out of Space by H.P. Lovecraft, The Head Hunters by Ralph Williams, The Star Dummy by Anthony Boucher, Catch That Martian by Damon Knight, Shipshape Home by Richard Matheson, Homo Sol by Isaac Asimov, Alexander the Bait by William Tenn, Kaleidoscope by Ray Bradbury, "Nothing Happens on the Moon" by Paul Ernst, Trigger Tide by Wyman Guin, Plague by Murray Leinster, Winner Lose All by Jack Vance, Test Piece by Eric Frank Russell, Environment by Chester S. Geier, High Threshold by Alan E. Nourse, Spectator Sport by John D. MacDonald, Recruiting Station by A. E. Van Vogt, A Stone and a Spear by Raymond F. Jones, What You Need by Henry Kutner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett), The Choice by Wayland Hilton-Young, The War Against the Moon by Andre Maurois, Pleasant Dreams by Ralph Robin, Manners of the Age by H.B. Fyfe, The Weapon by Fredric Brown, The Scarlet Plague by Jack London, Heritage by Robert Abernathy, History Lesson by Arthur C. Clarke and Instinct by Lester del Rey

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