Tanith Lee

Tanith Lee was born September 19, 1947 in London. She moved often as a child, with her parents occupational changes. Her family maintained a large paperback collection and Lee actively read throughout her childhood. She sold her first piece of writing at age 21, but endured almost a decade of rejection while she worked various jobs. Her career finally launched in 1975 with DAW's publication of her adult fantasy novel, The Birthgrave. She has written in a number of different genres including adult fantasy, children's fantasy, science fiction, horror, romance and historical fiction. She has had an extremely prolific career, authoring over 90 novels and 300 short stories.

The Wars of Vis

"By the laws of the Kingdom of Dorthar, most powerful of all the realms of Vis, the heir to the Storm Lord's throne is his last-born son. Thus should the crown belong someday to Raldnor, product of the Storm Lord's union with a light-skinned Lowland Priestess. But the Storm Lord's scheming queen, Val Mala, has other plans - plans that set in motion an extraordinary epic of passion, treachery, ambition and clashing gods on a distant and fascinating planet. Vis is a continent divided, dominated by the dark-haired, dark-skinned race of the Storm Lord, of his Queen - and of their son Amrek. Engineering the half-breed infant Raldnor's disappearance, Val Mala clears her son's path to the throne. The Storm Lord is the story of Raldnor, raised by the light-skinned, peace-loving Lowlanders, who returns years later to Dorthar. Strong and brave, he is hired by Amrek, now Storm Lord himself, to head the royal guard. Neither is aware of their blood connection. Neither bears the other ill...until Amrek's bride gives in to her growing passion for the pale-eyed Lowlander. Amrek's jealous fury crystallizes his resolve to rid the continent of Lowlanders. And only Raldnor stands between the Storm Lord and the horror of genocide. Outnumbered, apparently over-powered, the Lowlanders turn to Raldnor and to the snake goddess Anackire for help. Anackire returns us to Vis a full generation after The Storm Lord's shattering conclusion. A delicate and complex political balance has held for twenty years. Raldanash is Storm Lo9rd in peaceful Dorthar, but a tyrant rules in Zakoris and another is rising through treachery and intrigue in Karmiss. Piracy, assassination, torture and racial strife spread chaos as the fragile balance of peace tips inexorably toward war. As the armies converge, Anackire, the powerful and mysterious snake goddess, begins to stir again. And this time, she will unleash powers far beyond the dreams - or nightmares - of any mortal. Tanith Lee has been widely praised by fans and colleagues alike for her vivid world-creation and riveting prose. In The Storm Lord and its epic companion novel, Anackire, she has spun an engrossing fantasy brimming with dark magic, action, passion and mystery."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1984
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1984
Cover Art: Carl Lundgren
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Storm Lord and Anackire by Tanith Lee

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Dark Castle, White Horse

"In Darkness she wakes - a beautiful young woman, forever imprisoned in the Castle of Dark. Guarded and bespelled by two old hags, can she master the secret magic to summon the champion who will set her free? Into Darkness he rides - a handsome prince in an unknown realm. Who has conjured him here, and for what desperate deeds? Hailed as the Looked-for-Deliverer, with a changeling horse for companion, only he can challenge all magic's perils - from the Dragon of Brass to the Mad Witch to the kingdom-destroying horror, the evil, enigmatic Nulgrace!"

Original Publication: DAW, March 1986
This Edition: DAW, March 1986
Cover Art: Ken W. Kelly
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Castle of Dark and Prince on a White Horse by Tanith Lee

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Electric Forest

"Children were the most overtly cruel. They would chase after her, gleefully screaming taunts pulling her hair, jabbing her with small, sharp objects, pinching or tripping her, so that she would have to scramble awkwardly and painfully to her feet again. But the children weren't her only tormentors. Strangers on the street would stop and stare, or look away until she had passed, or change their course to avoid brushing against her. For Magdala Cled was horribly disfigured - a human monstrosity forced to live in a society of regular features and well-formed bodies. On Indigo, her home world, as on all the planets of the Earth Conclave, foetal conception was supposed to be the controlled result of selective artificial impregnation. It was an excellent way to ensure that all children were born healthy and at least reasonably attractive. Magdala, however, had been conceived biologically...an error in contraception which her mother, a licensed prostitute intent on trade, had been too busy to correct with an abortion. Dumped on the State at birth, Magdala had grown up surrounded by people who had hated her, or at best ignored her. Yet she survived, hiding her pain and fury from those who caused it and, when possible, even hiding it from herself. It was in Blue, the season before Fall on Indigo, that Magdala met the man who would change her life. She saw him first on the street - as supremely handsome as she herself was repulsive...a passerby who, like so many others, flinched at the sight of her grotesque form. But Claudio Loro was different from all the rest because, for reasons of his own, he pursued her. Magdala found him waiting to talk to her in the dark, out-of-the-way booth she customarily chose in the public caferteria near her home. There was something about him that frightened her, yet when she fled the cafeteria in confusion, Claudio broke into her apartment, callously demonstrating how helpless she was against him. She was terrified by the man's ruthless persistence, and begged him to leave her alone. But in the end Caludio had his way - because he offered her the one temptation he knew she could never resist. "How would you like," he said distinctly, " to be beautiful?" And with these words, lonely, frightened, ugly Magdala Cled became Claudio Loro's property - in ways she could never have anticipated."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1979
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1979
Cover Art: Jack Woolhiser
Format: Hardback

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Day By Night

"The planet did not rotate. On one side eternal day, the sun shining down hotly from the center of the heavens. On the opposite side eternal night, the stars glowing cold in the black and aireless sky. Yet the planet had been colonized. In ages past civilization had dug into the rock of the darkside and had thrived. Aristocrats vied with aristocrats, and the poor, as ever, struggled to keep home and body together against the ever-encroaching cold surface. To keep the lower classes happy, Vitra, the storyteller, spun romantic sagas on the popular network. She imagined a strange world on the sunside, inhabited by men and women enmeshed in crime and love, schemes and intrigues. Vitra believed she was making this up. But was she? Was there really another civilization on the bright side and could it be that what she related was not fiction - but events which would inevitably send both worlds out of sync to mutual disaster?"

Original Publication: DAW, November 1980
This Edition: DAW, November 1980
Cover Art: Don Maitz
Format: Paperback

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Sometimes, After Sunset

"Here are two mesmerizing novels by one of SF's fastest rising stars: SABELLA, or THE BLOOD STONE. Love was a luxury she could not afford. The huntress does not love her prey, after all, and Sabella Quey's need to hunt was overpowering. It had been so ever since the day she had wandered into the ruins on Novo Mars and found the strange gem. The thirst for blood had grown in her just as desire grows in most young women. And back then, inexperienced, reckless, she had stated her lust with any of the boys who whistled after her - boys who were unaware that death awaited them in her arms. As she matured, Sabella became cautious; she did not kill the men who pursued her, but rather allowed them to use her body to satisfy their needs - all the while satisfying her own. The gem, pale at first, would become deep red as her hunger abated, but the men didn't notice the change. They would faint, ecstatic, and afterward never remember the true nature of Sabella's passion. Yet there were people who understood what Sabella was...people feared and despised her. And of those, one in particular had found a way to vent her hatred...KILL THE DEAD. A hush came over the inn's common room when Parl Dro entered. A few in the crowed who recognized him spread the word: he was the Ghost-Killer. Conversation resumed as Dro ordered a meal, and he listened quietly to their nervous sallied. "How do you sleep nights?" someone asked, not really expecting an answer. "He sleeps all right," came the reply. "There'ss be plenty with cause to thank him." "And plenty who curse him," another man said. The room was growing quiet again; they wanted to know, yet dared not ask too directly. "Well, you've had a wasted journey to this place, Parl Dro," someone ventured at last. "We haven't any deadalive here." He had been expecting such a comment, and readying himself to say the words none of them wanted to hear. "Oh, but you're wrong," he told them quietly. And almost against their will, they believed him."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, December 1980
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, December 1980
Cover Art: Don Maitz
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Sabella or The Blood Stone and Kill the Dead

Review:


Cyrion

"He came to the Honey Garden looking for Cyrion. He was a man in grave danger, convinced that only one man alive could help him. A man he had heard about in song and story. A man practically everyone knew something about. A man he had never met. CYRION Some said he was the stolen son of a western king, raised by nomads in the desert. A freelance swordsman, a sorcerer, a master of disguise, some said he attracted bizarre, uncanny events as some persons attract misfortune. He with hair like the sky of earnest sunrise, his fair complexion, his whiplash reactions and quicksilver elegance was like being from another world. A legend. A myth. But was he real? And was he for hire?"

Original Publication: DAW, September 1982
This Edition: DAW, September 1982
Cover Art: Ken W. Kelly
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Prologue: The Honey Garden, Cyrion in Wax, 1st Interlogue, A Hero at the Gates, 2nd Interlogue, One Night of the Year, 3rd INterlogue, Cyrion in Bronze, 4th Interlogue, The Murderous Dove, 5th Interlogue, Perfidious Amber, 6th Interlogue, A Lynx With Lions, 7th Interlogue, Second Prologue: The Olive Tree, Cyrion in Space and Epilogue

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