Donald A. Wollheim

Donald Allen Wollheim was born October 1, 1914 in New York City. He is considered one of the first and most vociferous sf fans. He published a large number of fanzines and his importance is chronicled in the book The Immortal Storm by Sam Moskowitz. He organized the first science fiction convention in 1936 from which the modern Philcon and Worldcon derive. He was a member of the New York Science Fiction League, was expelled for being disruptive and later reinstated. In 1938 Wollheim and a number of friends formed the Futurians, one of the best known science fiction clubs with members including: Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Damon Knight and Larry Shaw.

Wollheim published his first story in Wonder Stories in 1934. He published a large number of books during the 1950s and 1960s, using pen names for his adult oriented works and his own name for those aimed at children. He was also known as an editor, editing the first mass market science fiction anthology, The Pocket Book of Science Fiction. He also edited Stirring Science Stories and Cosmic Stories. From 1947 until 1951, he was editor of Avon Books and also Avon Fantasy Reader and Avon Science Fiction Reader.

Wollheim left Avon in 1952 and moved to Ace where he led a new paperback imprint, Ace Books. He invented the renowned Ace Doubles where he debuted such authors as: Philip K. Dick, Leigh Brackett, John Brunner and Ursula K. le Guin. In 1965, Ace bought the paperback rights to Dune. During the 1960s no paperback publisher would print fantasy, but Wollheim released an unauthorized paperback edition of The Lord of the Rings after discovering that Tolkien's publisher had failed to protect the work in the United States. He paid Tolkien and this act with its mass success led to the wide publication of fantasy work in the United States.

After leaving Ace in 1971, Wollheim and his wife founded DAW books. It was the first mass market specialist science fiction and fantasy publishing house. Most of the writers developed by Wollheim while at Ace followed him to DAW including: Philip K. Dick, Gordon R. Dickson and Kenneth Bulmer. He is considered by many to be the most significant figure in American Science Fiction Publishing, rivaling even the famous John W. Campbell. He was posthumously inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2002.

Edge of Time

"Here is an excellent idea rather well developed. The gimmick is that a group of scientists have succeeded in creating a universe-in-miniature they have created a primal super-atom which explodes into the cosmic fragments of which stars and galaxies are eventually made... In this pocket galaxy the evolution of stars and planets takes place with - to the observers - lightning speed. They watch the evolution of our own universe recreated, the coming of life on various scattered planets, the evolution of intelligent races, and the rise of civilizations. By watching as these imprisoned cultures reach and pass our own level, they hope to watch a counterpart of our own far future and to reap the science of many races, through many thousands of years. - Astounding Science Fiction"

Original Publication: Avalon Books, 1958
This Edition: Ace, 1967
Cover Art: Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Written as David Grinnell

Review:


Destiny's Orbit

"INTERPLANETARY NO-MAN'S LAND - Through Ajax Calkins was wealthy enough to buy anything on Earth his heart desired, the one thing he wanted most was strictly forbidden. That was a world of his own - a planet, however small, which would be his private kingdom in the sky. The Earth-Mars Space Administration stood in his path. They would tolerate no such Eighteenth Century derring-do in the commerical and workaday interplanetary channels of the Twenty-First Century. Empire-building was out. But when an offer from a bearded stranger opened the way to just such an adventure, Ajax leapt at the chance. In his luxury spacecraft Destiny he shot out through the inner planets to the tiny world that waited a king - and, unwittingly to a monster outer-planet empire that waited a detonator for cosmic war."

Original Publication: Avalon Books, 1961
This Edition: Ace, October 1962
Cover Art: Ed Valigursky
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Written as David Grinnell. Ace Double #F-161 with John Brunner's Times Without Number

Review:


Destination: Saturn

"In his own way, Ajax, Calkins was a modest man. Modestly wealthy - he was just a multi-billionaire. Modestly ambitious - he only wanted a world of his own. Modestly cooperative - he'd let the rest of his universe if they would let him alone. And he did have a world of his own, too. The strange planetoid Ajaxia with its load of pre-asteroidal science was all his - and even Earth recognized that, provided they could come to an agreement. But it was the sneaky Saturnians that were upsetting his applecart. Rather than make a deal, they fabricated their own Ajax Calkins, set him up, and walked off with Ajaxia. That was the sort of thing sure to make Ajax lost his modesty - and set off after his kidnapped world single-handed - with the rest of the Earth-Mars fleet too many million miles in the rear!"

Original Publication: Avalon Books, 1967
This Edition: Ace, 1968
Cover Art: Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Written as David Grinnell.Collaboration with Lin Carter Ace Double #H-85 with Philip E. High's Invader On My Back

Review:


World's Best Science Fiction 1970

"This acclaim was typical of the many fine reviews of last year's compilation of the World's Best Science Fiction, and it is equally applicable to the current volume, in which nearly half of the stories will be new even to regular readers of the American science fiction magazines. Here are stories of space exploration, strange human societies of tomorrow, adventures in the far future and compelling visions of world apocalypse. These are the finest stories of modern science fiction, a rich treasury of wonder to stay in your memory while the future continues to become the present."

Original Publication: Ace, 1970
This Edition: Ace, 1970
Cover Art: John Schoenherr
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Terry Carr. Interior artwork by John Schoenherr. Contents: A Man Spekith by Richard Wilson, After the Myths Went Home by Robert Silverberg, Death by Ecstasy by Larry Niven, One Sunday on Neptune by Alexei Panshin, For the Sake of Grace by Suzette Haden Elgin, Your Haploid Heart by James Tiptree, Jr., Therapy 2000 by Keith Roberts, Sixth Sense by Michawl G. Coney, A Boy and His Dog by Harlan Ellison, And So Say All of Us by Bruce McAllister, Ship of Shadows by Fritz Leiber, Nine Lives by Ursula K. Le Guin and The Big Flash by Norman Spinrad

Review:


Ace Science Fiction Reader

"Ace Books, the leading publisher of science-fiction books, brings you a special treat in this new collection. Three novels of the future in one big book, each novel already a collector's item from Ace's fabulous backlist, each told by a writer who has won his Hugo from the world of science-fiction readers. The near future on the Moon is told by Clifford Simak in The Trouble with Tycho. The distant future on Earth is depicted by Jack Vance in The Last Castle. The far future of man is galactic space is narrated by Samuel R. Delany in Empire Star. It's a triple treasure of science fiction leaders."

Original Publication: Ace, 1971
This Edition: Ace, 1971
Cover Art: John Schoenherr and Jack Gaughan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Variant title of Triology of the Future. Contents: The Trouble with Tycho by Clifford D. Simak, The Last Castle by Jack Vance and Empire Star by Samuel R. Delany.

Review:


The 1974 Annual World's Best SF

"Editor Donald Wollheim is a true pioneer of science fcition. In 1943 he was responsible for the first science fiction anthology (now a rare collector's item) and he may have produced more exceptional SF anthologies since that time than any other present-day editor, The 1974 Annual World's Best SF continues the tradition of quality that he has established and presents the finest works of the past year by a prominent array of top science fiction authors. Some of the works include: Construction Shack by Clifford SImak. In the same year that man first walked on Mars, the Pulto probe was launched from the Moon. Five years later the first close-up photographs were transmitted back to eageerly waiting scientists on Earth. The pictures showed that the planet had an almost polished surface, without a single geographic feature to break the small orb's smoothness. But at certain places were mysterious tiny dots - dots that went unexplained until a trio of space explorers discovered that Pluto was not a planet at all...but something much more dark and ominous. A Suppliant in Space by Robert Sheckley. Detringer had been banished from his home planet of Ferland for "acts of incredible grossness." Taken deep into the void via starship and set adrift in a tiny, underpowered Sportster, Detringer was voluntarily accompanied by his faithful mechanical servant, Ichor. Together they braved the perils of space until, at last, they met up with Earth's first interstellar expedition. That's when The Big Bluff began! Deathbird by Harlan Ellison. Who is Satan....a myth...a superstition...or a living entity? Nathan Stack found out the answer when a cataclysm sent his mind reeling back to the creation of the unvierse. There, caught between the gates of hell and the path to heaven, Nathan discovered the startling true identities of God and the Devil - and the mighty power that man could weild over these seemingly omnipotent beings. Death and Designation Among the Asadi by Michael Biship. It was a rare delight for anthropologist Egan Chaney to travel to a strange, idyllic planet like Boskveld. For there lived the Asadi - primitive aliens with a unique and very mysterious culture. Some scientists even claimed the Asadi were descendants of some ancient super civilization. Only after several months on the planet did Chaney discover the alien's startling secrets and their unusual way of surviving on an otherwise uninhabited world....These and other stories by R. A. Lafferty, Frederik Pohl, Jack Williamson and Norman Spinrad - on subjects ranging from Rissuan time machines to the future of Womens' Lib - make The 1974 World's Best SF a truly memorable volume."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1974
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, September 1974
Cover Art: Victor Valla
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: A Suppliant in Space by Robert Sheckley, Parthen by R. A. Lafferty, Doomship by Frederik Pohl and Jack Williamson, Weed of Time by Normal Spinrad, A Modest Genius as by Vadim Shefner, The Deathbird by Harlan Ellison, Evane by E. C. Tubb, Moby, Too by Gordon Eklund, Death and Designation Among the Asadi by Michael Bishop and Construction Shack by Clifford D. Simak

Review:


The 1977 Annual World's Best SF

"Editor Donald Wollheim is a true pioneer of science fiction. In 1943 he was responsible for the first SF anthology (now a rare collectors item) and he may have produced more exceptional collections since that time than any other present-day editor. The 1977 Annual World's Best SF continues the tradition and presents the finest works of the past year by some of the most gifted authors writing in the genre. Some of the tales included are: Appearance of Life by Brain W. Aldiss. The Korlevalulaw...their name conjures up pictures of gods and demons. We know that they were inhuman. We know that they had abandoned the written word by the time they lorded over the star lanes. What we don't know is what became of them. Some have supposed that they committed some kind of racial suicide, while others postulate a mammoth galactic war that totally annihilated their specied. Yet no one is sure....at least not until one intrepid exporer visits their dark and ancient museum on the planet Norma. There he finds the aliens' secret and something more foreboding than anyone ever imagined...Natural Advantages by Lester drl Rey. Star Captain Anthor Sef sighed heavily and put down the trinoculars. Over his short snout and just above his third eye was a bulging forehead that ached painfully. The anti-matter cloud was definitely heading for solar system G. That's why the aliens had to be warned. Research had determined that their rocketry was primitive...their language incomprehensible...and their vision only binary. But by the Ancient Dust, thought Anthor, if there was a way of helping this race of beings called humans...He'd find it!....Houston! Houston! Do You Read? by James Tiptree, Jr. "I suppose," Lorimar said, "it's possible that in some sense we are not here." That doesn't sound too clear, but, then again, nothing had seemed totally real to the trip of astronauts since they had gone through the time warp. One moment they'd been gliding in the blank void of space takling with mission control; the next saw their tiny craft hurtled three hundred years into the future. The possibility of rescue seemed remote, until a giant ship paced them and urged them to enter. But who - or what - was inside? Was this an Earth vessel...or a machine from beyond the stars? They didn't have to wait long for the answers...These and other stories - on subjects ranging from cantankerous computers to troublesome time machines - make The 1977 World's Best SF a truly memorable volume."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1977
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, September 1977
Cover Art: Richard V. Corben
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Appearance of Life by Brian W. Aldiss, Overdrawn at the Memory Bank by John Varley, Those Good Old Days of Liquid Fuel by Michael G. Coney, The Hertford Manuscript by Richard Cowper, Natural Advantage by Lester del Rey, The Bicentennial Man by Isaac Asimov, The Cabinet of Oliver Naylor by Barrington J. Bayley, My Boat by Joanna Russ, Houston, Houston, Do You Read? by James Tiptree, Jr. and I See You by Damon Knight

Review:


The 1977 Annual World's Best SF

"So say the Chicago Daily News and the Miami News. Of last year's Annual, the American Library Association Booklist wrote: "The always reliable Wollheim has assembled his most satisfying collection in these ten stories solid professional stories as expected from a veteran editor and publisher who puts reader entertainment first." And the Canadian SF expert Don Hutchison wrote: "The DAW anthologies are always mercifully free of the wearisome stuff written by people out to score literary points at the expense of intelligibility...Wollheim edits with the reader in mind." The 1977 Annual World's Best SF continues the tradition of selecting the authentic best ten science fiction stories of the year. You can rely on this one."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1977
This Edition: DAW, May 1977
Cover Art: Jack Gaughan
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Appearance of Life by Brian W. Aldiss, Overdrawn at the Memory Bank by John Varley, Those Good Old Days of Liquid Fuel by Michael G. Coney, The Hertford Manuscript by Richard Cowper, Natural Advantage by Lester del Rey, The Bicentennial Man by Isaac Asimov, The Cabinet of Oliver Naylor by Barrington J. Bayley, My Boat by Joanna Russ, Houston, Houston, Do You Read? by James Tiptree, Jr. and I See You by Damon Knight

Review:


The 1980 Annual World's Best SF

"This year, Donald A. Wollheim has chosen 11 outstanding stories for his annual anthology of the best short science fiction - visions of the future.visions of Utopia.visions of ordinary human beings in extraordinary situations. For example: Options by John Varley. Cleo was a very happy woman. She loved her husband, her children, her job. She had no complaints about being female, no sexual dissatisfactions - yet the Sunday Supplement article on sex changing started her thinking. The idea never interested her before, and she knew that her husband was against it. But one afternoon, while wandering through the city's medical district, Cleo stepped into the New Heredity Body Salon on impulse. The handsome young consultant was most helpful. He stood her in front of a computerized full-length mirror for a simple demonstration of what could be accomplished. And Cleo liked what she saw. SHe could always revert later, after all - the Change didn't have to be permanent - and there were so many intriguing possibilities. The Thaw by Tanith Lee. Carla Brice meant nothing to her descendant Tracey. But Carla was one of 70 people who, back in 1993, had been victims of terminal diseases, and had opted to undergo cryogenic suspension. Now, some 200 years later, smack in the middle of the future those people had expected so much from, Carla was going to be defrosted - and the Institute had asked Tracey to help her great-great-great-great-great-grandmother to adjust. Tracey wan't too keen on the idea at first, but the situation seemed harmless enough...a good deal all around, Tracey thought. But she was mistaken. The Thirteenth Utopia by Somtow Sucharitkul. The Inquestor was proud of his record; he was truly a master iconoclast, a purder of planets, a transformer of societies. "Every Utopis has its flaw" was his motto, and he had proved it repeatedly throughout his career...intended to prove it again on the planet Shtoma. First he would impress the inhabitants with the Lie - that their world was being considered for the honor of being named a human sanctuary. Then he would begin his search for their "ideal" society's fatal flaw. But the Inquestor was in for a surprise, becaue there was one tiny fact of life on Shtoma he knew nothing about. Well, actually, it wasn't a tiny fact at all...Also included - stories by George R.R. Martin, Larry Niven and Steve Barnes, Ted Reynolds and others."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1980
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, September 1980
Cover Art: Gary Viskupic
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: The Way of Cross and Dragon by George R. R. Martin, The Thirteenth Utopia S. P. Somtow, Options by John Varley, Unaccompanied Sonata by Orson Scott Card, The Story Writer by Richard Wilson, Daisy, in the Sun by Connie Willis, The Locusts by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes, The Thaw by Tanith Lee, Out There Where the Big Ships Go by Richard Cowper, Can These Bones Live? by Ted Reynolds and The Extraordinary Voyages of Amelie Bertrand by Joanna Russ

Review:


The 1981 Annual World's Best SF

"In the 1981 Annual World's Best SF - this long-established tradition is again upheld. You will find the ten best of the year's short stories and novelettes from all the available sources in the English language. This is the real thing."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1981
This Edition: DAW, May 1981
Cover Art: Michael Mariano
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Variation on a Theme from Beethoven by Sharon Webb, Beatnik Bayou by John Varley, Elbow Room by Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Ugly Chickens by Howard Waldrop, Prime Time by Norman Spinrad, Nightflyers by George R. R. Martin, A Spaceship Built of Stone by Lisa Tuttle, Window by Bob Leman, The Summer Sweet, the Winter Wild by Michael G. Coney and Achronos by Lee Killough

Review:


The 1982 Annual World's Best SF

"Science fiction readers everywhere know Donald A. Wollheim as one of the most perceptive and discriminating editors in the field. Now, in The 1982 Annual World's Best SF, he delights and stimulates all lovers of the genre once more, in ten stories that uphold its best literary traditions. Among them, you'll enjoy..."The Pusher" by John Varley. Ian Haise is a seducer of children. In the playground, he waits until he has found the perfect victim - pretty little Radiant Smith, age 11. After he wins her attention with candy, he launches into a beautiful, mesmerizing, well-rehersed story of enchanted castles, caverns beneath the sea, riders astride horses that fly through the galaxy, evil alien creatures, a magical Prince and Princess, and a wonderous Starstone. When the story is ended, he presents Radiant with the talisman itself. For Ian Haise must seize a place in memories, at any cost..."Out of the Everywhere" by James Tiptree, Jr. Paula Marrell, daughter of a successful research engineer, is brilliant, with a particular bent toward science and mathematics. When Paula and her father decide to allay the effects of the California drought with an iceberg towed down from the North, they can't know that it contains the body of an alien creature. Years earlier, at the time of Paula's birth, the alien had been caught by the Sun's gravity. In a desperate effort to save itself, it dispersed its intellectual energy, some of which came to rest in the new-born child. Now Paula's bond with the alien has grown stronger. As the iceberg moves South, it reclaims this strayed portion of its mind, and she finds that she must use all her force to save it from the deadly interstellar predator who follows in its wake..."The Cypertone"...by S.C. Sykes. Computer games are habit-forming to children and adults. When Dan Morgan tried out the Cyphertone, the new game that's entrancing his son, Jarrod, he finds that he too can't stop playing. And then Jarrod begins to hear voices...and Dan wonders if the game, which the manufacturer claims was itself invented by a computer, isn't prehaps the tool of some other force, using children as the means to an unknown, horrifying end. With other stories by Jayge Carr, C. J. Cherryh, Michael P. Kube-McDowell, David J. Lake, Ted Reynolds, Michael Shea, and Somtow Sucharitkul, this latest volume in the highly acclaimed series will be a welcome addition to every SF reader's library."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1982
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, September 1982
Cover Art: Dawn Wilson
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Blind Spot by Jayge Carr, Highliner by C. J. Cherryh, The Pusher by John Varley, Polyphemus by Michael Shea, Absent Thee from Felicity Awhile... by S. P. Somtow, Out of Everywhere by James Tiptree, Jr., Slac// by Michael P. Kube-McDowell, The Cyphertone by S. C. Sykes, Through All Your Houses Wandering by Ted Reynoldsand The Last Day of Christmas by David J. Lake.

Review:


The 1983 Annual World's Best SF

"Every year for more than a decade, Donald A. Wollheim's Annual World's Best SF has presented the highest achievement in science fiction writing.and the greatest pleasure in SF reading. This year, The 1983 Annual World's Best SF offers ten thrilling, thought-provoking stories that show today's most adventurous writers - old maters and new talents alike - pushing ever further the boundaries of their chosen genre. Among the tales gathered here are: "Farmer on the Dole" by Frederik Pohl. Zeb had always felt at home on the farm. As a specially-outiftted agricultural robot, Zeb took pleasure in tasting the soil for nutrients, inhaling the fresh air of the plains to test for CO2, and H2O content, and doing the other tasks that working for the Boss called for. What with the parties thrown for the workersby Miz Boss and the Chillen, and even the Sunday church sermons by Reverend Harmswallow, Zeb was content with his lot. But then the farm was closed, and Zeb was shipped off to big-time Chicage. Unfortunately he could not seem to get the hang of his new urban environmnet. Reprogrammed as a mugger, he kept picking the wrong victims. But it turned out he wasn't alone in his problems. There was an entire subculture of out-of-work and downtrodden robots for him to commiserate with. And it was among them that Zeb discovered a talent that his programmers never thought of. "Pawn's Gambit" by Timothy Zahn. Kelly McClain had read the news items about people kidnapped by aliens and forced to play board games before release, but who would have beleived they were true? And none of the reports mentioned that the games were played for keeps! When the advanced, warlike Stryfkar transported Kelly to their game center, it took all his wits to dream up a game plan that would save both himself and his opponent...and teach the Stryfkar a lesson about gameplaying that they wouldn't forget. "Souls" by Joanna Russ. Everyone in the village knew that the Abbess Radegunde, if sometimes a bit more outspoken than one expected from a nun, was blessed with a wisdom and sanitliness that must have been heaven. But when the barbaric Vikings arrived to conquer and sack, and the Abbess went out to confront them, the villagers discovered just how unearthly Radegunde really was. This latest volume of the highly acclaimed series includes Connie Willis' Nebula-winning story, "A Letter From the Clearys," plus stories by Tanith Lee, James White and others; it will be a welcome addition to every SF reader's library."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1983
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, September 1983
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: The Scourge by James White, A Letter from the Clearys by Connie Willis, Farmer on the Dole by Frederik Pohl, Playing the Game by Gardner Dozios and Jack Dann, Pawn's Gambit by Timothy Zahn, The Comedian by Tim Sullivan, Written in Water by Tanith Lee, Souls by Joanna Russ, Swarm by Bruce Sterling and Peg-Man by Rudy Rucker

Review:


The 1984 Annual World's Best SF

"For nearly 20 years, Donald A. Wollheim, the legendary writer, editor and publisher, has been treating science fiction fans to an annual collection of short stories and novellas billed as the "world's best." This year he has sifted through the multitude of published tales to present one of his finest anthologies ever...From Isaac Asimov comes Potential, the story of a young boy named Roland Washman from Plainview, Iowa, whose registered genetic pattern conforms to a pattern scientists have determined leads to telepathic abilities. But their tests for telepathy lead the research team to a conclusion far from the truth...In Spending the Day at the Lottery Fair, Frederik Pohl applies the American Instinct for gambling to the problem of overpopulation. The result? You can have a great time at the lottery fair - if you're willing to pay the price for a ticket to ride....Greg Bear's Blood Music tells of Vergil Ulam, a brilliant but immature young biochemist whose plan to convert blood cells into "miniature intelligences" goes awry when he fails to consider a dangerous possibility...The Harvest of Wolves is Mary Gentle's startling tale of a future dictatorship where an old woman named Flix learns the value of her lifetime of idealism when she's forced to weigh it against the grim realities of the time...In As Time Goes By, Tanith Lee postulates a universe of two thousand-plus time streams that collide in the Static Zone...of space stations where ships change time lines like ocean freighters in canal locks...and of a time ghost with a grave warning for a space pirate named Curtis...In the Face of My Enemy, by Jospeh H. Delaney, tells of Kimberly Ryan, a young woman dispatched to make a required ecological survey of a planet being exploited by a mining company - and the immortal Indian named Casey who changes her life...Robert Silverberg's contribution is Homefaring, a stunning novella about a man called McCulloch, whose consciousness is sent forward millions of years in a time-travel experiment - and lands in the mind of an intelligent lobster...Stories by Rand Lee, Thomas Wylde and Don Sakers round out the 1984 Annual, an anthology sure to satisfy any SF fan's apetite for exciting and provocative reading."

Original Publication: DAW, May 1984
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, August 1984
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Blood Music by Greg Bear, Potential by Isaac Asimov, Knight of Shallows by Rand B. Lee, Spending a Day at the Lottery Fair by Frederik Pohl, In the Face of the Enemy by Joseph H. Delaney, The Nanny by Thomas Wylde, The Leaves of October by Don Sakers, As Time Goes By by Tanith Lee, The Harvest of the Wolves by Mary Gentle and Homefaring by Robert Silverberg

Review:


The 1985 Annual World's Best SF

"So wrote USA Today of last year's volume of this best-of-the-year science fiction seires. Similar comment has come from all over the U.S., Canada, and the world ever since 1965. This, the latest in this most selective of annual SF anthologies, upholds that standard - and as this year was a good one, may excel. Here is an up-to-the-minute novella about the computer revolution by the knowing hand of John Varley. Here's Stephen Donaldson, of Thomas Covenant fame, entering into interplanetary warfare SF with a trump card. Here also is Connie Willis with a real twister on planetary colonization. That's just the beginning. It's the years crop of the best, selected, as ever, by the experts you can trust."

Original Publication: DAW, June 1985
This Edition: DAW, June 1985
Cover Art: Frank Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: The Picture Man by John Dalmas, Cash Crop by Connie Willis, We Remember Babylon by Ian Watson, What Makes Us Human by Stephen R. Donaldson,Salvador by Lucius Shepard, Press Enter by John Varley, The Aliens Who Knew, I Mean, Everything by George Alec Effinger, Bloodchild by Octavia E. Butler, The Coming of the Goonga by Gary W. Shockley and Medra by Tanith Lee

Review:


The 1986 Annual World's Best SF

"Since 1985, science fiction readers have enjoyed a wealth of topnotch SF conveniently gathered into the exciting Annual World's Best anthologies. This 1986 collection is a worthy addition to the series, with ten outstanding stories by such acclaimed writers in the field as Frederik Pohl, Harlan Ellison, Connie Willis and C.J. Cherryh - stories of instaneous interstellar travel...of consumer heaven in the far future...of alien worlds with long-buried secrets no man was ever meant to find. Visions of tomorrow created by today's masters, such as: The Gods of Mars by Gardner Dozios, Jack dann and Michael Swanswick. It was the first manned mission to the planet of Mars, and with the whole world watching, the men in charge were determined to make it a total success. So, naturally, things started going wrong almost immediately. The surface storms which delayed landing until it was almost too late - well, they were bad enough. But the real humiliation came later, when they found out just how unprepared the mission planners really were. Because as it turned out, when the astronauts were finally able to view the Martian surface again, they discovered it wasn't at all the barren wilderness they had been expecting. A Nebula nominee. The Jaguar Hunter by Lucius Shepard. Through his wife was the spendthrift, the obligation of paying off her creditor fell to Esteban, and the only way he knew to get the money was by taking up the dangerous profession of jaguar hunter once again. All would have gone well for him, too, except that he was sent to kill a particular cat which had somehow managed to elude all other would be slayers, and found himself falling helplessly under a secret spell. For it was, in truth, no ordinary beast but rather a creature of magic...a creature that could either destroy him - or reveal to him ancient sorcery that had been all but forgotten in the modern world. A Nebula nominee. Saling to Byzantium by Robert Silverberg. In Earth's far distant future, humans have evolved into godlike immortals and life is an endless round of traveling to five ever-changing, carefully constructs of the men and women who once inhabited them, the immortals roam at leisure - reveling in the luxurious court of the Chinese emperor, then abandoning it for the pleasures of ancient Alexandria, or sailing on to new delights in a just-built replica of Byzantium. When even this lavish entertainment begins to pall, however, the immortals conceive a way to add fresh excitement to their lives - by bringing real people from the past into the present - people like Charles Phillips, a 20th century American. Yet, not suprisingly, what is simply a pleasant diversion for the immortals becomes, for Charles, far more significant and serious. For waht can a mere man do when he falls in love with a goddess? A Nebula winner."

Original Publication: DAW, June 1986
This Edition: DAW/Science Fiction Book Club, August 1986
Cover Art: Ron Walotsky
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Earthgate by J. Brian Clarke, On the Dream Channel Panel by Ian Watson, The Gods of Mars by Gardner Dozios, Jack Dann and Michael Swanwick, The Jaguar Hunter by Lucius Shepard, Sailing to Byzantium by Robert Silverberg, Webrider by Jayge Carr, With Virgil Oddum at the East Pole by Harlan Ellison, The Curse of Kings by Connie Willis, Fermi and Frost by Frederik Pohl and Pots by C. J. Cherryh

Review:


The 1987 Annual World's Best SF

"Its not surprising that science fiction is booming..it deals with the future.it supplies answers - sometimes grim, sometimes hopeful, but answers they are to the ineradicable worries of intelligent people." So says Donald Wollheim is his introduction to this year's Annual collection - a volume that vividly reflects what Wollheim calls "determination and the will to keep on dreaming great dreams." Against Babylon by Robert Silverberg. Mike Carmichael was an expert pilot responsible for dumbing chemical flame retardants on the brushfires that annually threatened L.A. He hated that tawdry Babylon of a city, hated having to save the crazy Angelenos from what he felt was their own idiotic carelessness year after year. He only stayed there for the sake of his wife, Cindy. Cindy, whose unique view of life had captivated Mike from the start. Cindy, whose curiosity about the unknown was about to be satisfied by a peculiar stroke of luck. Bad luck, for Mike. BEcause this years fires had been started, not be a throughlessly discarded cigarette, but by the engine heat of three alien spaceships that had landed in the parched L.A. basin. Lo, How An Oak E'Er Blooming by Suzette Haden Elgin. Willow Severty was struggling to make her feminist audience understand the male establishment would alway sfind ways to combat angry rhetoric and even the most carefully written laws. Words would never be enough; they needed a miracle. "Something that money and power and law cannot do," she told her listeners. "It would be sufficient for the bare oak tree, standing out there naked in the snow, to burst all at once into glorious bloom." As they turned to look out the window, Willow drew a deep breath, and the tree did indeed burst into impossible bloom. What's more, to the growing frustration of politicians, scientists, clergymen, military experts and horticulturists, that oak tree just kept blooming...Strangers On Paradise by Damon knight. They called it Paradise...a beautiful world free from the diseases, violence and overcrowding so common on Earth. After months of medical isolation on the entryport satellite, Howard Selby had arrived and was ready to begin his work" research for a definitive biography of Eleanor Petryk, a lyric poet who had lived on this idyllic planet for thirty years - the last ten in total silence. None of the people Selby spoke to could explain why she had stopped speaking and writing, nor did they seem the least bit curious about the puzzle. It was only by chance that he learned the truth - exactly how and why, for Eleanor Petryk, Paradise had turned to Hell. This year's volume also includes four Nebula nominees: "R & R" by Lucius Shepard, "Permafrost" by Roger Zelazny, "The Lions are Asleep This Night" by Howard Waldrop and "Pretty Boy Crossover" by Pat Cadigan. Plus stories by Jerry Mededith and D. E. Smirl, Doris Egan and Tanith Lee."

Original Publication: DAW, June 1987
This Edition: DAW, June 1987
Cover Art: Tony Roberts
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: Permafrost by Roger Zelazny, Timerider by Doris Egan, Pretty Boy Crossover by Pat Cadigan, R & R by Lucius Shepard, Lo, How an Oak E'er Blooming by Suzette Haden Elgin, Dream in a Bottle by Jerry Meredith and D.E. Smirl, Into Gold by Tanith Lee, The Lions Are Asleep This Night by Howard Waldrop, Against Babylon Robert Silverberg and Strangers on Paradise by Damon Knight.

Review:


The 1988 Annual World's Best SF

"It's the latest volume in a distinguished series - the towering ten-story 1988 Annual anthology featuring the talents of some of the SF's most celebrated writers! Orson Scott Card shares a near-mystical vision of a new New World in "America." Sam Monson was only 15 years old when he first met Anamari Boagente. She was about 40. They seemed to have nothing in common - he was in the Amazon jungle against his will because the geologist father he desised had custody of him for the summer; she was the closest thing to a doctor that the local indians ever saw. But when he began helping Anamari take care of her people, Sam proved that he wasn't just another uncaring norteamericano. Indeed, as the Indian woman and the Yanqui boy came to know one another, they discovered that they had something most extraordinary in common: they were both dreamers....whose dreams came true. And as time passed, their dreams began to intertwine, weaving a pattern for the future. James Tiptree, Jr., offers "Second Goind," an intriguing variation on the first-contact theme. The members of the U.S. Mars expedition naturally assumed that the aliens they encountered on that planet were Martians. But they quickly discovered that the Angli came from some imaginably remote sector of the galazy, and humanity was only one of countless spient species they'd visited in their travels. And what a visit it was - telepathic, seemingly friendly aliens flying all over the globe, really getting to know the citizens of Earth. Still, the question remained: why? What did such advanced beings want from us? And from Pat Murphy comes Nebula Award nominee "Rachel in Love." His extensive research had shown that each individual brain produced its own unique pattern of fields, as distinctive as finger prints. So when Dr. Aaron Jacobs lost both his wife and daughter in a tragic automobile accident, he was able to save his daughter, in a way - by imposing the prerecorded pattern of her mind upon the brain of a young female chimpanzee. he named the chimp Rachel and raised her as his own child, instructing her in American Sign Language, teaching her to read and write. But he never prepared her for the very real duality of her nature...the occasional conflict between her human and primate memories...the disparity between two very different self-images. And when the doctor suddenly died, Rachel was forced to resolve the conflicts by herself: a beautiful young woman locked in a cage like an ordinary laboratory animal, an ape with the awakening emotional needs and reactions of a teenage girl. Also included are Nebula nominees by Kate Wilhelm and Pat Cadigan, plus works by Robert Silverberg, Lucius Shepard, Tanith Lee, Don Sakers and Walter Jon Williams."

Original Publication: DAW, June 1988
This Edition: DAW, June 1988
Cover Art: Blair Wilkins
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: The Pardoner's Tale by Robert Silverberg, Rachel in Love by Pat Murphy, America by Orson Scott Card, Crying in the Rain by Tanith Lee, The Sun Spider by Lucius Shepard, Angel by Pat Cadigan, Forever Yours, Anna by Kate Wilhelm, Second Going by James Tiptree, Jr., Dinosaurs by Walter Jon Williams and All Fall Down by Don Sakers

Review:


The 1989 Annual World's Best SF

"Donald Wollheim had done it again! With an uncanny knack for discovering promising new talents and picking award-winning fiction, he has proven himself one of the most influential forces in modern science fictino. And now he's gathered 11 of the finest stories published in 1988 - including four major award nominees - for this 1989 Annual World's Best SF anthology. Here are Steven Gould's "Peaches for Mad Molly" (nominated for both Nebula and Hugo Awards) and "Schrodinger's Kitten" by George Alec Effinger (winner of the Nebula and a Hugo nominoo). The first offers a startling perspective of the future, as the narrator of the story journeys through the divers, often dangerous levels of his society; the second is a gripping exploration of quantum physics and the many possible alternate futures generated by a young girl's rendezvous with destiny in a deserted alleyway. Among the other innovative visions of the future you'll find: "Adrift Among the Ghosts" by Jack L. Chalker, the poignant story of an alien criminal sentenced by his nonviolent race to be the sole inhabitant of a space probe collecting TV programs beamed from an Earth they can no longer contact - the electronic ghosts of a devastated world. "Ripples in the irac Sea" by Geoffrey A. Landis (a Hugo nominee) is the story of a youthful physicist who discovers time travel, and begins searching the past in hopes of escaping his present-day dilemma. Tanith Lee's "A Madonna of the Machine" portrays a haunting tomorrow in which free will has been replaced by an enternally programmed existence serving the Machine - until one man, possessed by a recurring Vision of a beautiful woman, dares to question the purpose of this existence. "The Flies of Memory" by Ian Watson describes an encounter with alien "tourists" - gient Flies that memorize everything they see - whose plan to take home "souvenirs" prompts a human reaction that may lead to a tragic loss for both the Flies and the peoples of Earth. And Wollheim has included equally enthralling works by David Brin (the Hugo-nominated "The Giving plague"), John Shirley, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, B.W. Clough and Frederik Pohl. From a virus that can create a more altruistic race of human beings to rebellion in a grim police state fueled by the next step in computer evolution, The 1989 Annual World's Best SF is a landmark collection that opens the way to exciting new dimensions of the imagination on the cutting edge of SF."

Original Publication: DAW, June 1989
This Edition: DAW, June 1989
Cover Art: Jim Burns
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Arthur W. Saha. Contents: The Giving Plague by David Brin, Peaches for Mad Molly by Steven Gould, Shaman by John Shirley, Schrodinger's Kitten by George Alec Effinger, The Flies of Memory by Ian Watson, Skin Deep by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, A Madonna of the Machine by Tanith Lee, Waiting for Olympians by Frederik Pohl, Ain't Nothin' But a Hound Dog by B. W. Clough, Adrift Among the Ghosts by Jack L. Chalker and Ripples in the DIrac Sea by Geoffrey A. Landis

Review:

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