Gordon Dickson

Gordon Dickson was born on November 1, 1923 in Edmonton, Alberta, but moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota with his mother as a teenager. He graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1948. Dickson published his first story, a collaboration with fellow science fiction author Poul Anderson in 1950 in Fantastic Stories Quarterly. He then went on to work with the infamous John W. Campbell, publishing several works in Astounding Science Fiction.

Dickson published over 100 short stories and 55 novels in his career. He was known for being a strong supporter of the space program and attended several Apollo launches. He was the President of the Science Fiction Writers of America from 1969 to 1971, and was the recipient of the E. E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction in 1975. He also was awarded 3 Hugo Awards, a Nebula Award and a Jupiter Award. He was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. His work often posed important questions about human nature and pondered humanity's future expansion throughout the galaxy.

Gordon Dickson suffered his entire life from severe asthma and passed away on January 31, 2001 from complications of his condition.

Thank You, Beep! published in Hewlett Packard Personal Calculator Digest in 1979.

No Room for Man

"Judgment Day - The machine that controlled all life wouldn't tolerate any interference. People who refused to be regulated had to be disposed of - isolated, driven insane, murdered. A small group of men had dedicated themselves to fighting this Frankenstein of man's technological achievement. Secretly they laid plans to destroy the maching and all its works...including the millions of people who had accepted their robot-like existence. Either way, the human race was doomed!"

Original Publication: Mcfadden Books, September 1963
This Edition: Mcfadden Books, September 1963
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Paperback

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Variant title of Necromancer

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Spacepaw

"Operation Spacepaw - Bill Waltham has a strange suspicion that one or two important details were withheld from him when he received his assignment to the planet Dilbia. At the time, his task - to teach the planet's gorillalike inhabitants the very basics of agriculture - seemed innocent enough, even boring, project for an engineering student. But Bill immediately senses a very definite Dibian hostility toward interfering humans. And in trying to solve a major crisis on the planet, he finds himself involved in an Homeric knock-down, drag-out brawl that affects no bones except the reader's funny bone."

Original Publication: G.P. Putnam's Sons, February 1969
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, July 1969
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

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Sleepwalker's World

Original Publication: J. B. Lippincott, August 1971
This Edition: DAW, October 1972
Cover Art: Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

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The Alien Way

"Alien Jason Barchar was the only man in contact with the Ruml, creatures bent on the conquest of earth. His mind was inextricably linked to that of Kator, leader of the expedition that would spearhead the invasion. But the contact was so close that Jason as the moment of Earth's greatest peril drew closer and closer was no longer sure whether he was a man"

Original Publication: Bantam, February 1965
This Edition: Bantam, July 1973
Cover Art: Gene Szafran
Format: Paperback

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The Pritcher Mass

"The only hope for mankind's survival after the contamination of the Earth lay in the Pritcher Mass, a psychic forcefield construction out beyond the orbit of Pluto. Created by the efforts of individuals with extraordinary paranormal powers, the Mass was designed to search the universe for a new habitable planet. Chaz Sant knew he had the kind of special ability to contribute effectively to the building of the Mass, but somehow the qualifying tests were stacked against thim. Then he learned that he had become the special target of an insidious organization that fattened on the fears of the last cities of the world. His confrontation with this organization, their real motives and his unexpected reactions, were to touch off the final showdown for mankind's last enterprise."

Original Publication: Doubleday, October 1972
This Edition: DAW, September 1973
Cover Art: Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

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The R-Master

"By the middle of the twenty-first century the World Economic Council supplies the basic needs of every individual. And for those people who want to increase their personal value and effectiveness in society, there is Reninase-47, an intelligence-stimulating drug. In rare cases, however, R-47 does massive damage to the mind; in even fewer cases it creates a supergenius - an R-Master. None of this interests Etter Ho, who clings fiercely to his independence, to his right simply to wander the oceans in his sloop Sarah - until his brother Wally takes R-47 and becomes a statistic on the negative side of the ledger. Now Wally's body lies encased in a cryogenic capsule, his life processes suspended. Etter, as an ordinary citizen, cannot afford the medical procedure which might revive his brother. As a step toward obtaining the status required to help Wally, Etter takes R-47 himself - freakishly emerging as an R-Master. It is a position of apparently unrestricted privilege, but when he asks to contact other R-Masters, the only one who will speak to him is an old man named Malone, a recluse with the cryptic word MOGOW scrawled across his door. Through contact with Malone, Etter begins to realize that the World Economic Council has created, not a Utopia, but a perpetual prison for mankind. His investigation of this prison brings a discovery of what really crippled Wally's mind - and the price Etter himself must pay to reclaim man's future."

Original Publication: J.B. Lippincott, November 1973
This Edition: J.B. Lippincott/Science Fiction Book Club, March 1973
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Hardback

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The Star Road

"Nine short stories by one of the most prominent writers in the field of science fiction. Filled with the drama and excitement of man's first tentative steps toward the stars, they examine the mystery of existence and the very real possibilities that lie within the realm of future experience. And together they show Gordon R. Dickson at his entertaining best."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1973
This Edition: Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, June 1973
Cover Art: Bill Naegels
Format: Hardback

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Contents: Whatever Gods There Be, Hilifter, Building on the Line, The Christmas Present, 3-Part Puzzle, On Messenger Mountain, The Catch, Jackal's Meal and The Mousetrap

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Ancient, My Enemy

"From the pages of If, Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Analog magazines, nine memorable tales by Gordon R. Dickson: Ancient, My Enemy - An arresting tale of love and loss involving a space age prospector who suddenly comes face to face with the deadliest alien of all - himself; The Odd Ones - A saga of two "philosophical engineers" whose job it is to balance the survival techniques of every creature on a planet - and their first encounter with Earthlings; The Monkey Wrench - In which a perfect machine that insists on being logical at all times becomes the perfect sucker - with ironically grim results; Tiger Green - a nightmare story of visitors from Earth stranded on a planet whose inhabitants love them enough to free them from their lives; The Friendly Man - he'd waited a long time to see the man out of time - but his whole purpose was one he'd never realize; Love Me True - In this deceptive chiller a young space pioneer becomes the unwitting victim of an insidious weapon whose strength lies in its ability to make its victims love it; Our First Death - A poignantly human story of a space colony of the uprooted and unprepared, working out of their obscure destiny in a world somehow more recognizable than the realms of interstellar heroes; In the Bone - A parable of men and machines and the terrible danger of confusing a creation and its creator; The Bleak and Barren Land - Where exiles from an overcrowded world struggle to establish a small part of the Earth they once knew - and would never know again."

Original Publication: Doubleday, October 1974
This Edition: Doubleday, October 1974
Cover Art: Peter Rauch
Format: Hardback

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Dorsai!

"Donal Graeme, Dorsai of Dorsai, was the final link in a long genetic train, the ultimate soldier, whose breadth of vision made him a master of space war and strategy - and something even greater. He was the focus of centuries of evolution, the culmination of planned development, and through im a new force made itself felt. The Dorsai were renowned throughout the galaxy as the finest soldiers ever born, trained from birth to fight and win, no matter what the odds. With Dorsai at their head they embarked upon the final impossible venture: they set out to unify the splintered worlds of Mankind. DORSAI! is the magnificent conclusion of Gordon R. Dickson's epic version of the future, a vision as sweeping and brilliant as Asimov's Foundation trilogy."

Original Publication: OPTA, April 1971
This Edition: DAW, February 1976
Cover Art: Paul Lehr
Format: Paperback

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The Dragon and the George

"Gordon R. Dickson, the celebrated author of Three to Dorsai! And Ancient, My Enemy, is a recognized master of science fiction; but now, with The Dragon and the George, he turned his hand to the anything-goes world of fantasy - and the result is equally as exciting. Unlike most stories of magic and sorcery, this tale does not commence with the words, "Once upon a time...." Instead it begins at 5:30 PM, sharp, in front of Stoddard Hall on the RIveroak College campus. Jim Eckert had just pulled up in front of the science offices to pick up his girlfriend Angie, and, as usual, crazy professor Grottwold was keeping her late - a fact that made Jim very, very mad. And his wrath grew more intense with each running step he took toward the laboratory. Eight doorways and six flights of stairs later, he burst through the glass doors just in time to see the professor crouched over what looked like Dr. Frankenstein's control panel. Angie was seated against the far wall with her head and face completely covered by what seemd like the helmet of a gigantic hair-dryer. Furiously, he called out her name and she just disappeared - winked out like a light. Jim tried to keep calm and adjust his eyes while the excited Grottwoldkept shouting, "She aported, she aported. All I was hoping for was some slight astral movement. But she aported to another world instead." Jim's head was whirling. It was unbelievable that he should be standing here listening to this nonsense - but far less believable was the fact that Angie had actually vanished. "All right, turkey!" he said as he grabbed the progessor by the lapels, "you get her back here right away, or I'll start taking you apart!" "I tell you I can't," cried Grottwold, "but I've got an idea. There's a chance - a long chance - but it just might work. Since I can't bring the girl back here myself, I could send you after her..." And so begins one of the most fantastic quests of all time, as Jim Eckert bravely follows his love to a distant dimension - an unknown land where he finds himself implanted in the body of a huge dragon...an alternate medieval universe where wolves can talk, black knights joust, and unpredictable magicians hold awesome powers....a strange and dangerous world that hides the secret of his lost love! An exciting blend of dramatic adventure and startling imagination, The Dragon and the George will delight and enthrall all lovers of science, swords and sorcery."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1976
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1976
Cover Art: Boris Vallejo
Format: Hardback

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The Dragon and the George

"Jim Eckert was a dragon. He hadn't planned it that way, but that's what happened when he set out to rescue his betrothed. Following her through an erratic astral-projection machine, Jim suddenly found himself in a cockeyed world - locked in the body of a talking dragon named Gorbash. That wouldn't have been so bad if his beloved Angie was also a dragon. But in this magical land, that was not the case. Angie had somehow remained a very female human - or a George, as the dragons called any human. And Jim, no matter what anyone called him, was a dragon. To make matters worse, Angie had been taken prisoner by an evil dragon and was held captive in the impenetrable Loathly Tower. So in this land where George's were edible and beasts were magical - where spells worked and logic didn't - Jim Eckert had a problem. And he needed help, by George!"

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, July 1976
This Edition: Del Rey/Ballantine, August 1981
Cover Art: Boris Vallejo
Format: Paperback

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Naked to the Stars

"The subject of the cosmic soldier has become a matter of concern for the science fiction reader. With the award-winning success of The Forever War, and with the great classic novels of Gordon R. Dickson's genetically bred mercenaries, the Dorsai, it is clear that the role of a fighter in a universe of expanding technology and competing alien intelligences is on science fiction's order of the day. Gordon R. Dickson has been the master of that field, and his novel, Naked to the Stars, is one of his masterpieces. Long out of print, it is the story of a star soldier who, during a battle against a non-human foe on a far planet, somehow lost sixteen hours from his memory. Discharged for the potential danger those lost hours might have programmed, Cal Truant made it his fixation to uncover the mystery buried in his mind - to find out what had happened in those missing hours - and block the peril it might present to his fellow troopers, to his war command, and to the planet for which they fought - Earth."

Year of Publication: Lancer Books, August 1970
This Edition: DAW, January 1977
Cover Art: Paul Lehr
Format: Paperback

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None but Man

"Out there...beyond the frontier beyond the last human settlement in the Pleiades, lay the territory of Moldaug: alien, menacing things from far, inhuman stars, who were gathering their forces for war. And it seemed that the people of the Old Worlds, in unreasonable and unreasoning fear, were preparing to sacrifice the colonies of the New Worlds in a cowardly attempt to avert that war...But not if frontiersman Cully When had anything to do with it! This exciting, action-filled adventure, set in a future century, is a beautifully detailed description of space-age guerrilla warfare and age-old human obstinacy. Its Gordon R. Dickson at his best!"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1969
This Edition: DAW, May 1981
Cover Art: Richard Hescox
Format: Paperback

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Review:

None But Man by Gordon R. Dickson was a fairly decent read. It is essentially an story about how cultural misunderstandings can lead to war and how mutual understanding between different cultures must be deliberately sought to ensure generational peace. The main character, Cully When, is thrust into acting as a diplomat and rebel leader in a three-way misunderstanding between the Old Worlds, the New Frontier and the alien Moldaug species. Using rather traditional space opera form, Dickson paints a picture of an Old World Earth stuck in its ways, stodgy and uncompromising and riddled with fear of the unknown, a New Frontier filled with hardy individuals innately prepared to adjust and adapt to new challenges and an incomprehensible alien species which is unable to view the world through any other perspective other than their own, at least not without guidance. Cully When must bridge the gap.

From the limited amount we are given the Moldaug are an interesting species. They exist as a three-person individual, requiring all three to function. Those who don't exist in these small groups are are considered odd or mentally unstable. They also function under the social constraint of maintaining 'Respectability.' To a human, something is right or not right, to the Moldaug, actions are either respectable or unrespectable. This difference in how humans and Moldaug view the actions of each other has led the two cultures to the brink of war. But Cully sees a different outcome for the two peoples. Cully speaks to the leader of the Moldaug and he says, "Look around yourself, my Cousin Ruhn. The universe has shown the desirability. Myself has from the beginning striven for this to get across, to human and Moldaug alike, that two great races such as that of ye and we, powerful in armed might and of differing thoughts, cannot exist side by side in space without eventually either cooperating or destroying each other. And the key to cooperation is the responsibility upon both we humans and ye Moldaug alike to accept each other on the other's own terms, and judge them by their other standard."

This wasn't the greatest novel, but certainly not the worst. There's enough action and intrigue to keep the reader interested, but there are not layers and layers of depth. The characters are pretty shallow and for the majority of the story, Cully's actions seem meaningless. I would have liked to see Dickson develop the Moldaug and to have given them a more coherent culture. Detail was lacking, but it was entertaining.

Alien Art

"Time and again.colonists on a new world would struggle with untamed wilderness, endure incredible privation, expend their utmost effort to pay off the "First Mortgage" on their virgin planet. Then would come the developers, company men, intent on transforming yet another wilderness planet into a second-rate, raped and polluted imitation Earth. It always happened that way. But not this time - not if Mattie, Cary and Charlie could stop them! Of course, Mattie was a nineteen-year-old girl, Cary, an ignorant backwoodsman, and Charlie, a swamp otter who carved things with his teeth - and against them stood the resources of a hundred worlds..."

Year of Publication: E.P. Dutton, April 1973
This Edition: Ace, April 1978
Cover Art: David Plourde
Format: Paperback

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The Far Call

"Along with a very few among the Earthbound billions of the 1990s, Jens Wylie dreamed of a future for Man among the stars. He seized the chance to become U.S. Undersecretary for the Development of Space and to help plan the first manned Mars voyage. But political compromise and corner-cutting built disaster into the expedition from the start. And when disaster struck, threatening the lives of the marsnauts and the whole destiny of the human race in space, only Jens saw that had to be done - and do it, he had to risk his own life, face the loss of the woman he loves, and defy the awesome power of the President of the United States. Vivid in action and rich in character, The Far Call, by the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of Timestorm, is a soaring epic of our own near future and of the dreamers and the doers who will make it come to pass."

Original Publication: The Dial Press, May 1978
This Edition: Dell, October 1978
Cover Art: Robert Adragna
Format: Paperback

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Review:

Jens Wylie was a newsman who loved the space program. He was offered the position of U.S. Undersecretary for the Development of Space and took it with the idea that it would provide him much hands on experience with which he could write a book. His position gave him intimate access to the men training for the upcoming mission to mars. While working with them, the captain of the mission, Tad Hansard informs him that the experimental load is too heavy for the nauts and cannot be completed. Jens uses his position to access President Fanzone and explain the situation. The problem is, this is an international mission and no country is really willing to give ground in their expectations, therefore the warning is not heeded and the mission continues as planned.

The mission is essentially doomed from the beginning because of politics. Tad comes up with a way to maintain the mission parameters, but it involves him skipping some of his rest and exercise period and this leaves him exhausted and not thinking clearly. As a result, he makes a fatal error when the ships are hit by a solar flare and he takes a lethal dose of radiation. The powers that be on Earth determine that with Tad ill and the ships damaged, the mission should be aborted. The nauts have different ideas.

The Far Call by Gordon Dickson is not your run of the mill science fiction novel. It doesn't involve high adventure and over the top concepts. It is grounded in the reality that is the space program. It centers on the many people involved in the planning and execution of an international space mission and all of the politics that come into play. It qualifies as hard science fiction as it describes many of the maneuvers and technical aspects of such a mission, but it also is an epic story of mankind's ability to overcome its limitations and push forward in spite of individual agendas. It's a complicated novel, involving a host of characters and follows their lives and impact on the mission. Toward the end of the book, the main character Jens has a thought that well describes Dickson's apparent vision in writing this piece. He writes "Jens' voice trailed off. He looked at Lin with enormous delight that had not so much to do with her, although she was part of it, as with he had once again realized threads; scarlet, gold and black, of no color and all colors, making up the tapestry that he had envisioned in that waking dream beside her months ago, just before the launch a grand woven design that was this flawed, glorious, fallible, noble, selfish human enterprise."

While I would not label The Far Call a masterpiece or consider it the best Dickson has to offer, I did think it was an interesting take on the reality of the space program. I would think anyone interested in the potential impact of international politics on the progression of the space program would enjoy the details involved in this novel.

Hour of the Horde

"Annihilating everything before it, a horde of monstrous space travellers were advancing through the stars. And Earth lay in their route. To defend their home planets, the worlds that lay in the path of the monsters created a super defense force, asking for each planet to contribute one especially talented warrior to help turn the invaders away. Miles Vander was Earth's man, but when he arrived at the rendezvous point he found that he was included in the special task force of the less civilized defenders. But in the contest of advanced nuclear weaponry and computer strategy, it turned out to be Vander's group that had the special independent qualities and the raw courage to meet the challenge the most effectively. It's a novel of galactic warfare by the author of the bestselling DORSAI novels."

Original Publication: G. P. Putnam's Sons, August 1970
This Edition: DAW, January 1980
Cover Art: Greg Theakston
Format: Paperback

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Masters of Everon

"On Everon, their home world, maolots grew to be the size of large Terran horses; Mikey had simply never matured in Earth. Although it was eight years since Jef Robini's brother Will had sent the cub home - Will had been with the Ecological Corps at the time, overseeing the colonization of Everon - Mikey was still no bigger than a St. Bernard, and his eyes were as tightly sealed as they'd been during his infancy. Yet Jef knew the young Maolot was not blind in the sense that an Earth creature would have been. He knew it because Mikey and he shared a rapport that seemed to be growing stronger as they approached their destination. Everon, the planet of Mikey's birth - and Will Robini's death. Sitting with Mikey, apart from the ship's other passengers to whom even a small maolot was frightening, Jef thought about his brother again. The official notification from the Corps had been cold and vague, with no mention that Will had died in the line of duty. Rumors had floated back to the Robini's that their son had deserted his post, gotten involved with criminals; but Jef had never believed such talk. He meant to find his brother's grave on Everon and put an end to the rumors. But that was personal, and right now he had a more pressing concern - Mikey. Their closeness had led to Jef's Ph.D. thesis: that maolots held a clue to the greater understanding of Everon and, perhaps, all colonized worlds. Now that he was about to test his thesis, his mind whirled with questions. How would Mikey take him home environment? Would he grow to full, open-eyed maturity? Would he know how and what to hunt? Most of all, would he be accepted by his own species? The maolot growled just then, upsetting and angering some of their fellow passengers, and reminding Jef of the hostility he and Mikey had faced throughout the voyage. He knew that maolots were formidable predators and sometimes preyed on the human's herds of variform livestock, but it seemed unreasonable to blindly hate creatures that were only fulfilling their natural rold in a planet's chain of life. Was it possible that the colonists no longer cared about Everon's ecology? Did the Corps officials protect maolots and other native life forms - or didn't they? Suddenly Jef realized just how little he actually knew about Everon's native flora and fauna, its human settlers and its imported herds - the very basics of survival. In truth, there was just one thing Jef was certain of as he prepared to set foot on Mikey's home world: Will's death was not Everon's own mystery."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday, September 1979
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday, September 1979
Cover Art: Mike Hinge
Format: Hardback

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The Space Swimmers

"On one man rests the fate of the world.Six years ago, Johnny Joya les the sea-born Cadets of the Space Academy back to the sea. He knew that the sea-and-land-born must separate or clash. When the Cadets refused to return to the Land, the Sea-People were declared outlaws...hunted and killed like animals in a one-sided war without quarter. Now one of the hunters offers the Sea-People safety - but at a price: Johnny Joya must lead his people after the Space Swimmers, along the golden roads between the stars, but not for themselves - for the Land. The fuse is lit. Will Land and Sea smash in a final explosion or emerge into a future undreamed of by both?"

Original Publication: Berkley Medallion, February 1967
This Edition: Ace, September 1979
Cover Art: Tom Pritchett
Format: Paperback

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Spacial Delivery

"The subject of the cosmic soldier has become a matter of concern for the science fiction reader. With the award-winning success of The Forever War, and with the great classic novels of Gordon R. Dickson's genetically bred mercenaries, the Dorsai, it is clear that the role of a fighter in a universe of expanding technology and competing alien intelligences is on science fiction's order of the day. Gordon R. Dickson has been the master of that field, and his novel, Naked to the Stars, is one of his masterpieces. Long out of print, it is the story of a star soldier who, during a battle against a non-human foe on a far planet, somehow lost sixteen hours from his memory. Discharged for the potential danger those lost hours might have programmed, Cal Truant made it his fixation to uncover the mystery buried in his mind - to find out what had happened in those missing hours - and block the peril it might present to his fellow troopers, to his war command, and to the planet for which they fought - Earth."

Original Publication: Ace Double, 1961
This Edition: Ace, January 1979
Cover Art: Steve Hickman
Format: Paperback

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Soldier: Ask Not

"On fourteen worlds, Man was no longer wholly Man. On Dorsai, He was Warrior, an indomitable mercenary born and bred to battle, a pure evocation of the martial spirit. On Newton He had become the scientist, all but lost to his brothers in his involvement with the workings of the Universe. On the Exotics they had bred the Mystic, and on the Friendlies they had raised up the True Believer. Newsman Tam Olyn watched his sister's husband - a man under his protection - die in a senseless act of brutal "Driently" violence, and set himself to the destruction of the whole Friendly culture. And though a mere man, of Old Earth stock, Tam Olyn was something more as well; singlehandedly, he might just succeed in wrecking worlds...in his way stood a single lonely figure 0 Jamethon Black, Man of Earth."

Original Publication: Dell, July 1967
This Edition: Ace, March 1980
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Statement from Dell's July, 1967 paperback edition: "If the title of this book should seem familiar it is because one-third of it, as a novella, won the Hugo Award, the Pulitzer Prize of Science-Fiction. This one-third has not been expanded; rather it has been added to the remaining two-thirds of the complete story to form this most unusual, exciting and never-before-published novel Soldier, Ask Not."

Review:


Lost Dorsai

"Pacifism will always be a powerful moral force, even - perhaps especially - to the Dorsai. For those of this planet of warriors born and bred are not as other men; once a Dorsai's heart is given he holds nothing back, and does not count the cost. Even if that cost could be the very planet of his birth and he becomes a Last Dorsai. This is the newest work in Gordon R. Dickson's Childe Cycle. This volume also includes the Dorsai novelette "Warriors," and a laudatory Afterward by noted sf critic, Sandra Miesel."

Original Publication: Ace, August 1980
This Edition: Ace, August 1980
Cover Art: Enric
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Lost Dorsai, Warrior, The Plume and the Sword and The Final Encyclopedia: An Excerpt

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The Spirit of Dorsai

"The Childe Cycle is the lifework of one of science fiction's greatest practitioners, Gordon R. Dickson. The centerpiece of that lifework is the planet Dorsai and its people. Here, for the first time, in a special, profusely illustrated edition, is an examination in depth, in the author's words, "an illumination," of the heart and soul of that people."

Original Publication: Ace, September 1979
This Edition: Ace, April 1980
Cover Art: Enric
Format: Paperback

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Wolfling

"To the High-born, the aristocracy of the Empire, with ten thousand decades of civilization behind them, Earthmen were mere "Wolflings," barely human curiosities. Jim Keil amused and intrigued them, so he was brought to the Throne World to perform - like any other trained animal - his simple tricks. But perhaps the Empire had ruled too long and too comfortably. Jim Keil had sharp eyes for the signs of decay and inertia that pervaded the Throne World. The time would come when the High-born would learn that their pet had dangerous claws."

Original Publication: Dell, May 1969
This Edition: Dell, December 1980
Cover Art: Maelo Cintron
Format: Paperback

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Combat SF

"Seconds or centuries from now, war will still be war - pain and fear and suffering in which some men find death and some life; where men will face a truth they had never known - or one they had always feared to discover. Whether they fight on the soil of the Earth or in the vacuum of space, whether they live as flesh and blood or entombed in thousands of tons of metals and weaponry, the people presented here are what war is - and what war makes them."

Original Publication: Doubleday, June 1975
This Edition: Ace, June 1981
Cover Art: Vincent Di Fate
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Hide and Seek by Arthur C. Clarke, The Last Command by Keith Laumer, Men of Good Will by Ben Bova and Myron R. Lewis, The Pair by Joe L. Hensley, Situation Thirty by Frank M. Robinson, The Butcher's Bill by David Drake, Single Combat by Joseph Green, The Man Who Came Early by Poul Anderson, Patron of the Arts by Fred Saberhagen, Time Piece by Joe Haldeman, Ricochet on Miza by Gordon R. Dickson, The Scavengers by James White, No War, or Battle's Sound by Harry Harrison, The HORARS of War by Gene Wolfe and Fireproof by Hal Clement

Review:


In Iron Years

"The work of a master. Hugo-Winner, Nebula-Winner, author of the classic Dorsai novels of the Childe Cycle, Gordon R. Dickson is without doubt one of the finest authors this field has ever produced. Now, for the first time in paperback, here is a collection of stories spanning nearly two decades in the career of a man OMNI magazine has called "the model of the committed writer.""

Original Publication: Doubleday, August 1980
This Edition: Ace, December 1981
Cover Art: Stephen Hickman
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: In Iron Years, Homecoming, A Taste of Tenure, The Hours Are Good, Gifts, Zeepsday and Things Which Are Caesar's by Gordon R. Dickson

Review:


Necromancer

"The end of reason? In the future, life on Earth is good. Disease is checked, hunger ended, war and suffering abolished. Justice is available for all and no man bends the will of another. Walter Blunt would end this. His Chantry Guild carries its motto. "DESTRUCT!" and its power over the mystical Alternate Laws into the very heart of human society, with devastating effect. The unwilling instrument of the Guild's evil is Paul Formain, a cripple whose psychic skill with the Alternate Laws has marked him and Blunt's heir. But Forman, not frightened himself, has begun to suspect that his desire for this power stems from a soul no longer wholly his own...Necromancer"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1962
This Edition: Ace, April 1981
Cover Art: Steve Hickman
Format: Paperback

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Mutants

"Have you ever wondered what could happen if only things were a little different? Perhaps if only you were a little different? Is there any thinking person who has not pondered the almost infinite potential of man? Gordon R. Dickson, winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards, author of the bestselling Borsai novels, presents here eleven enthralling and thought-provoking variations on the human matrix. One is a mighty, dark and unconquerable warrior, another a child so far developed over present-day man there can be no understanding between him and us. A third has turned his back on land to answer the irresistible call of the undersea, a fourth is no longer human at all, but animal...One of the giants of the science fiction field gives us Mutants, a provocative testament to one of the most limitless mysteries of the cosmos - the incredible mutability of man!"

Original Publication: Macmillan, 1970
This Edition: DAW, March 1983
Cover Art: Paul Chadwick
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Warrior, Of the People, Danger-Human!, Rehabilitated, Listen, Roofs of Silver, By New Hearth Fires, Idiot Savant, The Immortal, Miss Prinks and Home from the Shore

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The Final Encyclopedia

"The "Childe Cycle," Gordon R. Dickson's future history about the ultimate destiny of humankind, moves toward its exciting conclusion with this latest volume. The human race has split into three Splinter cultures: The Friendlies, fanatic in their faith; the truth-seeking Exotics; and the warrior Dorsai. But now humanity is threatened by the power-hungry Others, whose triumph would end all human progress. Hal Mayne is an orphan who was raised by three tutors: an Exotic, a Friendly, and a Dorsai. He is the only human capable of uniting humanity against the Others. But only if he is willing to accept the terrible destiny of Savior of mankind."

Original Publication: Tor, October 1984
This Edition: Ace, October 1985
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Paperback

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The Man the Worlds Rejected

"Space exploration, an infinite number of possibilities; from the Apollo Project to the rejection of Mother Earth by a hostile galactic community. How will man adjust to the rigors of space and the tempest of alien interaction? Can he adjust and if so at what cost? The universe is boundless and man, the ever-seeking, must find and secure his place in the infinite vastness. Or forever be The Man the Worlds Rejected."

Original Publication: Tor, August 1986
This Edition: Tor, August 1986
Cover Art: Alan Gutierrez
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Man the Worlds Rejected, Jackal's Meal, Minotaur, Turnabout, Strictly Confidential, In Iron Years, The Monster and the Maiden and A Matter of Perspective with Frank Kelly Freas

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The Forever Man

"Mind and Machine. An ancient starship is found adrift in space, damaged by alien Laagi warships. The voice of its pilot still survives - a mind merged with the ship itself. Now, Earth's scientists attempt to duplicate the feat. Pilot Jim Wander has been chosen for the dangerous mission. His spirit transferred from his body to his own ship, Wander must make peace with the Laagi...or lose his ship and his mind. The Forever Man."

Original Publication: Ace, September 1986
This Edition: Ace, February 1988
Cover Art: James Gurney
Format: Paperback

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The Pritcher Mass

"Earth was Finished..After a strange and horrible fungal growth had irrevocably contaminated the planet, humanity's only hope lay out in the farthest reaches of the Solar System where the Incredible Pritcher Mass searched psychic wavelengths for living worlds. If one were found in time, a saving remnant of the race might achieve a new beginning. But, something of Earth, some ancient evil, seemed bent on the destruction of the Mass..."

Original Publication: Doubleday, October 1972
This Edition: Tor, September 1988
Cover Art: Joe Chiodo
Format: Paperback

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The Chantry Guild

"Only one thing could lure Hal Mayne away from his research aboard the Final Encyclopedia. It was the shattering news of the Younger Worlds' oncoming defeat - an inevitable triumph for the cross-cultural hybrids knows as the Others. To save Earth's future in space, Hal must journey to the planet Kultis where the powerful Alternate Forces have been mastered by the top secret Chantry Guild. There, Hal Mayne will meet his greatest challenge and ultimate fate - one that will alter mankind's destiny forever."

Original Publication: Ace, October 1988
This Edition: Ace June 1989
Cover Art: Jim Burns
Format: Paperback

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Review:


The Harriers Book One: Of War and Honor

"Earth is but a memory the real action these days is in The Magnicate, a league of all the human worlds in the galaxy. At the center of the Magnicate is the Hub, a huge artificial world from which control of Human Space flows. The Hub government is in the main an instrument for progress and social good, but even so control sometimes requires force - enter The Harriers. The Grand Harriers: an elite military force created to guard the Hub and the diplomats who travel there - and to ensure their own position as the one unassailable force in Human Space. The Petit Harriers: A motley band of hard-case adventures created to do the planet-side jobs the Grand Harriers wouldn't soil their white gloves on. No mission is too tough, dirty or dangerous. No method unthinkable. And yet the Petit Harriers do have their own kind of honor...and a hell of a lot more fun!"

Original Publication: Baen, April 1991
This Edition: Baen, April 1991
Cover Art: Studio H
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Of War and Codes of Honor by Gordon R. Dickson; Into the Hot and Moist. by Steve Perry; Tonight We Improvise by Shariann Lewitt

Review:


The Harriers Book Two: Blood and War

"The human race had settled over a hundred worlds before it met the Emerging Planets of Fairness Court - six alien species who sat in judgment on all galactic newcomers. Though their goals were liberal, compliance enforcement was ferocious; few dared defy the EPFC. To insure obedience, the EPFC placed observers on each ship of the candidate species. And so, the human fleets found themselves under the eyes of the Mromrosii - stern overseers who expected unquestioning obedience. Even the Petit Harriers, the peacekeepers and trouble-shooters of human space, were forced to admit the Mromrosii to their ships. The Harriers' mission was already tough enough. They had to settle planetary disputes, negotiate treaties with alien species, and protect human interests throughout the galaxy - come war, disaster or interspecies rivalry. They understood the EPFC's goals. They even agreed with the most of them. Both they also knew that sometimes they only way to enforce the rules was to throw away the rulebook. The problem was convincing the Mromrosii..."

Original Publication: Baen, August 1993
This Edition: Baen, August 1993
Cover Art: Nan Fredman
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Noble Savages by David Drake, Down Among the Dead Men by Gordon Dickson and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, and Mission of Mercy by Christopher Stasheff

Review:


The Dragon & the Gnarly King

"Jim Eckert is the Dragon Knight - a young mathematician who traveled to a parallel medieval world only to be transformed (intermittently) into large but non-too-bright dragon named Gorbash. Jim Eckert's daring exploits have earned him a title - Baron de Bois de Malencontri et Riveroak - and he has settled down to a peaceful life as a feudal lord, with his beloved Angela at his side. But a new peril endangers his enchanted realm - as the King of the Gnarlies teams up with the Earl of Cumberland, Jim's longtime rival, to kidnap his adopted son, Robert. Soon Sir Jim must assume the shape of the Dragon Knight once again to rescue little Robert, and finds himself entrenched in a magical battle royal - one he'll have to fight harder than ever to survive. "

Original Publication: Tor, August 1997
This Edition: Tor, May 1998
Cover Art: Boris Vallejo
Format: Paperback

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