Harry Harrison

Harry Harrison was born Henry Maxwell Dempsey March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut. He is of Irish and Russian descent and grew up in Queens, New York City. He was an only child and solitary by nature, therefore spent endless hours reading pulp magazines, especially science fiction, and borrowing books from the public library. He claimed to have little memory of childhood, but recalls his discovery of science fiction thusly, "My father gave me a copy of the old large-sized Amazing Stories, which appeared even larger in my seven-year-old hands, until it became a very bed-sheet of a magazine. I plunged into those rocket ship filled, time machine, ancient alien, strange invention stuffed pages and emerged with my whole life changed. For the better, I sincerely hope, but changed it was indeed."

In November of 1938, at age 13, he became one of 14 founding members of the Queens chapter of the Science Fiction League. A letter he wrote to Captain Future Magazine was published in the Fall 1940 issue and a his drawing of a robot appeared in the May 1941 issue of Sun Spots.

Harrison was drafted into the U.S. Army Air Corps and ended up going to technical school due to his high mechanical aptitude. He spent his military time working on a variety of tasks including repairing the Sperry Mark 1 and Military Police duties. It was during his time in the Air Corps that he became interested in and learned to speak and read Esperanto. He says "It was so boring in the army that I learned to read and write Esperanto to keep my mind alive." After his discharge, he joined the local Esperanto society and continued to work to promote the universal language throughout his life. In 1985, he was elected honorary patron of the Universal Esperanto Association, an honor he shared with only eight others.

The return to civilian life was rough for Harrison and he spent some time trying to figure out what to do. He attended Hunter College in New York, taking an art course taught by famous American painter John Blomshield. After the class he continued to study with Blomshield for two years privately. The G.I. Bill of Rights allowed him to further his schooling, so he enrolled in the Cartoonist and Illustrators school, working with Burne Hogarth and teaming up with Wally Wood for the first time.

Harry Harrison entered the science fiction world as an illustrator, most notably with EC Comics. His partnership with Wally Wood lasted until around 1950, when Harrison moved onto ghost writing and storyline writing for comic strips. His first short story was published in the February 1951 issue of Worlds Beyond. He began socializing with other science fiction writers like Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester and Theodore Sturgeon.

Harrison continued to develop himself as a science fiction freelancer through the 1960s with his Stainless Steel Rat and Bill, The Galactic Hero novels as well as the much lauded Make Room! Make Room!, which was eventually used as the basis for the 1973 science fiction film Soylent Green. During this time he was working closely with fellow author Brian Aldiss on anthologies and generally raising the standards of criticism in the science fiction field. Together they instituted the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. They also published the first serious journal of science fiction criticism, SF Horizons.

In 1976, Harrison organized the first World Science Fiction Writers Conference. During this conference the organization World SF was proposed, and came into existence in 1978. Harry Harrison was elected president for the first two years. During his presidency, long time friend Brian Aldiss instituted the Harrison Award, which was to go to someone seen to be improving the status of science fiction internationally.

His most interesting work, in this reader's opinion, is his West of Eden series. This trilogy of novels is set on an alternate Earth where the dinosaurs never went extinct and survived to modern day developing their own biological technology. This work has a much more literary style and a fully developed world filled with interesting heroes and villains.

Amazingly, and embarrassingly, Harry Harrison has never won any major award for a specific work of fiction. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame inducted Harrison in 2004 and the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named him its 26th Grand Master in 2008. Harry Harrison died in his apartment in Brighton, England on August 15, 2012.

Deathworld

"On first look the planet Pyrrus was a sunny, green world, cheerful and inviting. The careless visitor never had time for a second look. Every animal, insect, planet on Pyruus was dedicated to the elimination of mankind. Even the soft, green lawn was a carpet of death. And Pyrran children learned to kill before they learned to walk. But Pyrrus hadn't always been hostile to man. Why and when had it."

Original Publication: Bantam, September 1960
This Edition: Bantam, September 1960
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

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Review:


Bill, the Galactic Hero

"He was just plain Bill, a Technical Fertilizer Operator down on the farm, until a recruiting robot shanghaied him into the Empire Space Corps. Assigned to the spaceship Christine Keeler in the war against the lizard-like Chingers, Bill wasn't much of a soldier, but an act of accidental heroism won him the Purple Dart and a trip to Helior, the aluminum-covered central planet of the Empire. And then Bill's adventure really started. From his loss of a Helior floor plan (a major criminal offense) and his search for sanctuary in the department of garbage management in Helior's underground, to his exile and final redemption, Bill's tale is a perfect change-of-place for anyone who likes the best in modern science fiction."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1965
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, February 1966
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Paperback

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Make Room! Make Room!

"As in any other August, its hot in New York City but even worse than ever because of all the people the population now numbers thirty-five million. It is a New York City where each person is rationed to one quart of water a day, the staple food is seaweed crackers, and thousands of people live in the streets. Set against this background, which seems both unimaginable and yet prophetically possible, the bizarre death of a man brings together three people from different walks of life in hauntingly unusual adventure story of the future."

Original Publication: Doubleday 1966
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, July 1967
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Paperback

Notes:

From a 1975 interview for Tangent by Dave Truesdale & Paul McGuire III - "At the time there were no books about pollution or population. There were no books. I had to go to the library and dig around, to my book agent to get him to find books on population, on agronomy, on petroleum research and so on, to try to get every single facet of the world and try to put it all together, and make a close picture of say thirty years ahead. I got everyone's prediction of what it was going to be like and compared them. You can't get a one-to-one ration every time. Our petroleum consumption was easy; you have this graph that goes like this - here's production and here's consumption and here they cross. Easy. Discovered wells, hopefully discovered wells, and it runs pretty easy. You know just about what they're going to find. But agronomy it's more complicated. Utilization of land, new grain coming along; you have to put all this shit together, and finally I came up with the worst possible picture of the world I could. That's what you do, you know. But the question was, in practical terms, how would we be living some thirty years from now? What would people have, what wouldn't they have, and if they didn't have this or that, then what would they have instead. And then I took six years - while working on other things of course - and plotted it all out. I made that world as complete as I could. I had to make it all come together. And then came the art. I had to make a story of it. I outline everything in detail, sometimes ten, fifteen page outlines. I don't always follow it exactly, but I have to know where I'm going before I start."

From Harry Harrison: When the World Was Young a 2006 Locus interview - "Make Room! Make Room! may still be my best-known book. That was meant to reach the average reader. There's only one new scientific concept in there, 'memory wire,' which is barbed wire, dropped from a helicopter, that opens up. It was really the first book, fiction or non-fiction, about overpopulation. The idea came from an Indian I met after the war, in 1946. He told me 'Overpopulation is the big problem coming up in the world' and he said 'Want to make a lot of money, Harry? You have to import rubber contraceptives to India!' But I started reading a bit about overpopulation, and got the idea for the book. It stayed in my head as I watched the population trend go the wrong way. The thing took about eight years to write because I had to do a lot of research which was worth it."

Following are excerpts from the autobiography Harry Harrison! Harry Harrison! about the book Make Room! Make Room! and the creation of the subsequent film Soylent Green. These are merely bits and pieces of Harrison's essay on this subject. I encourage all my readers to go out and purchase Harry Harrison! Harry Harrison! immediately for a wonderful read and great insight into one of my favorite science fiction authors.

"It was in 1970 that a Hollywood lawyer called my agent, saying how much he loved my book Make Room! Make Room! and that he wanted to make it into a film.

"That's great!" I said when the good news reached me. But then I talked to the lawyer, who was gloomy about the future. "We're a small company and it's hard to put much money up front." This was all new to me, but my agent seemed to know what he was doing. Alas, he didn't. In fact he made the deal in an alcoholic haze and was dead of the same within a few months. My agent agreed on a low option fee and a modest price to buy rights - based on a promise of a decent payment later if the film did well.

"A hack named Stanley Greenberg was hired to write the screenplay. His script transmogrified and denigrated my novel, gutting it like a fish. If you do a screenplay of a book at full length, it would run for twenty hours, so you have to make cuts. Greenberg didn't make cuts. He threw out everything and substituted garbage for it."

"My novel Make Room! Make Room! is about overpopulation. I worked on it for a total of five years, digging out the material to make an intelligent estimate of what life would be like in the year 2000 A.D. At this time, in the 1950s, there was no popular nonfiction books on the dangers of overpopulation, overconsumption, pollution, and allied problems. But there was a great deal of talk and speculation in the scientific journals, and that interested me greatly. I researched population growth curves, oil depletion, food growth, etc., and came up with the figures I used in the book. I went to specialists - demographers, pathologists, and agronomists - and I read a great number of very thick books. It took a great deal of time to write the novel, which was the longest I had ever done, because as well as getting my facts right I had to write a realistic story set in that near-future world."

"I was impressed by two inescapable facts: the truly professional ability of everyone connected with the making of the film and the truly appalling quality of the script. That a successful film was made despite what might be considered a major obstacle can be credited to the art and set designers; the director, Richard Fleischer; and to the fine actors. As well as to, I submit with suitable humility, the strength of the novel."

"Stanley Greenberg, who knew nothing about science fiction, got up to give his speech in front of the fans and pros in the audience, and said some inarticulate nonsense like, "It's wonderful to be here.my pleasure to get this award.through art and emotion and sympathy we will conquer the universe."
"I gave him a slow hand clap and said, "Thank you to my inadvertent collaborator, Mr. Greenberg. I just want to say that not one word he said was true. It won't be emotion that will get us to the stars, it will be science, logic, and intelligence." I saw Greenberg scurry out of the back door and I gave him the finger. Everyone else broke up and gave him the finger as well. I had a really nice time because I knew the audience; they were my audience. That was a wonderful bit of revenge! Stanley Greenberg invented the idea "Soylent Green is people" - one of the dumbest ideas in the world."


Review:


The Technicolor Time Machine

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1967
This Edition: Doubleday, 1967
Cover Art: Cristiano
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Following are excerpts from the autobiography Harry Harrison! Harry Harrison! about the book The Technicolor Time Machine.

"The Technicolor Time Machine was structured as a straightforward adventure novel with twists in time, but the humor crept in and it got funny. I tried to be accurate, particularly as it first appeared in Analog"

"I had a good time doing the research, and it's about as accurate as you can get. There is very good evidence that the Vikings were in North America. I did a lot of research on the Viking map, which turned out to be a fake later on..They interacted with what they called the skraelling, who were probably Eskimos who lived further south in those days. It's pretty obvious that they did settle along the coast there."

"I started thinking about the time machine itself, and I was so bored with all the explanatory details about how a time machine would work, it's all nonsense, so I had this great cracking machine built by this Yugoslavian professor and they asked him how it worked and he said, "You're too stupid to understand." And that was all the explanation you got! That took care of that, and set the tone for the whole thing."


Review:


Deathworld 3

"The Killer Planet The planet was called Felicity. The name was a joke - except for those enticed to try and settle there. Inhabiting it were beings bred for thousands of years for a single purpose: attack and kill. Jason knew this. But he also knew the planet on which he lived was moving toward certain disaster. And Felicity was the only spot in the universe where he and his companions could survive. He thought he had worked out the perfect plan. But what awaited him on Felicity went far beyond his wildest imagining..."

Original Publication: Dell, May 1968
This Edition: Dell, May 1968
Cover Art: John Berkey
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Deathworld Trilogy

"They called Jason dinAlt a brilliant planetary gambler, but the odds were 100 to 1 that he'd never leave the world of Pyrrus alive. Warned of the dangers he'd find on the planet - an orb where all native life forms had evolved into murderous flora and fauna - Jason's craving for adventure and high stakes nevertheless drove him to make the voyage. His arrival on the death-dealing planet was the start of a nightmare. Jason had to be totally reconditioned to the ways and means of survival on Pyruss. They gave him a gun which automatically leaped out of its holster and into his hand when there was any hint of danger. They put him through months of rigorous training in lethal alien environments - where a fatal blow could just as easily come from a pretty flowered plant as from a horrifying winged bat beast. When Jason was finally released, he discovered that the Pyranns were herded together in one huge walled city, safe-guarded on all sides by sophisticated weaponry. His psi powers - mental skills he'd developed to aid him at gambling - immediately picked up the loathing the inhabitants had for their world, a planet that each day retaliated with new and more grotesque horrors of its own. But something just didn't add up. Jason knew of a group of farmers, called grubbers, who lived outside the walls of the city. No harm had ever come to them from Pyrrus' menagerie of terrors. How could this harsh jungle planet have singled out just those chosen few to protect? Jason had a hunch the city dwellers had overlooked something gravely important when they first came to colonize...something so basic that it took the simplicity of the grubbers to understand it. So, acting only on impulse, Jason made the biggest wager of his career. He bet his life that he would discover how the jungle farmers kept the planet's horrors at bay, and bring the secret back to civilization before Pyrrus sounded the final death knell for the threatened city...Only the first of three exciting novels, Deathworld 1 is followed by two more Jason dinAlt adventures. You'll travel with him when he is kidnapped and brought to a forbidden planet where men have to kill each other or live as slaves, a world where technology has degenerated and fallen into the hands of an evil Brotherhood. Then on Deathworld 3, where beings are bred for a single purpose, to attack and kill, Jason finds the one spot in the universe where the Pyrrans have a chance to save themselves from extinction. All three novels are guaranteed to provide hours of science fiction thrills and adventure."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, November 1974
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, November 1974
Cover Art: Richard V. Corben
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Review:


The Man from P.I.G.

Original Publication: Avon Camelot, May 1968
This Edition: Avon Camelot, May 1968
Cover Art: John Schoenherr
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Worlds of Wonder

"16 tales of science fiction"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1969
This Edition: Doubleday, 1969
Cover Art: Vladimir F. Hervert
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Sunjammer by Arthur C. Clarke, We Didn't Do Anything Wrong, Hardly by Roger Kuykendall, Who Can Replace a Man? by Brian W. Aldiss, Tricky Tonnage by Malcolm Jameson, Appointment on Prila by Bob Shaw, Hi Diddle Diddle by Robert Silverberg, If by Harry Harrison, A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber, The Howling Bounders by Jack Vance, Mirror of Ice by Gary Wright, Heavy Planet by Milton A. Rothman, Keyhole by Murray Leinster, The Wall Around the World by Theodore R. Cogswell, Prone by Mack Reynolds, Escape the Morning by Poul Anderson, Someday by Isaac Asimov

Review:


The Jupiter Legacy

"The space probe returned to Earth carrying a cargo of writhing death! No form of life on Earth seemed safe from the savage epidemic brought back from a distant planet. Quickly and mysteriously it spread over the earth's surface, drawing its victims into a slow and violent death. If Earth was to escape annihilation, the horrible plague had to be stopped! But there was so little time left to track down the case of The Jupiter Legacy"

Original Publication: Bantam, July 1970
This Edition: Bantam, July 1970
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Variant title of Plague from Space

Review:


Nova 1

"A giant new step in science fiction. You will not have read any of the stories in this book in any magazine or anthology. All are original contributions, personally selected by Harry Harrison, himself an outstanding SF writer as well as one of the most knowing authorities in the Sf world. Each of these tales - whether by an already renowned name, or by one of the exciting new SF generation - is designed to expand the frontiers of the imagination, and hold you spellbound with some of the greatest writing of today, and tomorrow. *The Big Connection by Robin Scott, A Happy Day in 2381 by Robert Silverberg, Terminus Est by Barry Malzberg, And This Did Dante Do by Ray Bradbury, The Whole Truth by Piers Anthony, Swastika by Brian W. Aldiss, Love Story in Three Acts by David Gerrold, The Winner by Donald E. Westlake and seven other dazzling new stories of SF action and adventure."

Original Publication: Delacorte Press, February 1970
This Edition: Dell, March 1971
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Big Connection by Robin Scott Wilson, A Happy Day in 2381 by Robert Silverberg, Terminus Est by Barry N. Malzberg, Hexamnion by Chan Davis, And This Did Dante Do by Ray Bradbury, The Higher Things by John R. Pierce, Swastika! by Brian W. Aldiss, The HORARS of War by Gene Wolfe, Love Story in Three Acts by David Gerrold, Jean Dupres by Gordon R. Dickson, In the Pocket by Barry N. Malzberg (as by K.M. O'Donnell), Mary and Joe by Naomi Mitchison, Faces & Hands by James Sallis, The Winner by Donald E. Westlake and The Whole Truth By Piers Anthony

Review:


One Step from Earth

"Its one step from Earth - but miles from the competition as Harry Harrison blazes new trails in science fiction with his latest collection of fascinating adventures in matter transmission. Picture the possibilities of a world where any three dimensional object or living thing could be broken down and transmitted across space to a receiver where it is restored in much the same way as television restores images, or the telephone transmitts sounds. Many science fiction writers have dealt with the technology of matter transmitters, but few have envisioned a world in which MT is as common as TV, as accessible as telephones, and directly involved in building and destroying new civilizations. Consider, for example, its possible uses and the impact of its presence upon different societies. What would be the effect on man and his institutions if MT became the mass communication-transportation of the future? That is the basic question. From it come the secondary questions. Every facet of life poses a new problem: food and clothes, marriage and business, work and war. Certainly war; the military latches onto every invention no matter how innocuous and uses it to keep the war machine clanking. POsitively medicine; look how ships have spread disease and how airplanes could do it even better - then consider the MT plague carriers. Language, social customs, everything will be affected by this new form of transportation. In these nine extraordinary stories, Harrison builds an MT-oriented universe where even love and death are subject to the vicissitudes of progress. Shrewed, witty, and ingenious, these stories span a time-zone from 1993, when a professional adventurer is transmitted to Mars, to the indeterminate apocalypse when humanity's lease is over and a new intelligence inherits the earth. From a beautiful love machine who marries a god and becomes the madonna of outer space (Being a wife to God is second in difficulty only to being God) to the MT "typhoid Mary" hat spreads a plague throughout the galaxy, One Step from Earth abounds with aggressive imagination. How will crime and punishment be changed by the advent of MT? or colonialization? Can man escape the robots of justice? These are just a few of the fast and provocative MT adventures awaiting the traveler who steps into the compelling world of Harry Harrison."

Original Publication: Macmillan, 1970
This Edition: Macmillan, 1970
Cover Art: Carl Titolo
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Matter Transmitter, One Step from Earth, Pressure, No War, or Battle's Sound, Wife to the Lord, Waiting Place, The Life Preservers, From Fanaticism, or for Reward, Heavy Duty and A Tale of the Ending

Review:


Prime Number

"Prime Fare! Ideas pour into the hopper of Harry Harrison's imagination, transformed here for your reading enjoyment into nineteen varied and memorable science fiction stories ranging in background from way down south in the land of cotton ("Mute Milton") to Sardi's Topside ("The Pod") and incorporating all manner of fanciful people and objects such as Professor Hakachinik ("Famous First Words"), the Venusian swamp-thing ("The Finest Hunter in the World"), and some curious worms and chameleons ("If"). A Feast for SF fans! In the prime of life Harry Harrison is a well-known SF author and editor. His most recent novels are Captive Universe and The Daleth Effect. He lives in southern California."

Original Publication: Berkley Medallion, July 1970
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, July 1970
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Mute Milton, The Greatest Car in the World, The Final Battle, The Powers of Observation, The Ghoul Squad, Toy Shop, You Men of Violence, The Finest Hunter in the World, Down to Earth, Commando Red, Not Me, Not Amos Cabot!, The Secret of Stonehenge, Incident in the IND, If, Contact Man, The Pad, A Civil Service Servant, A Criminal Act and Famous First Words

Review:


A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!

Original Publication: Faber & Faber, December 1972
This Edition: Tor, July 1981
Cover Art: Rick Sternbach
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Nova 2

"Science fiction has traditionally had its pages studded with fabulous gadgets and machines, a prediction of the wonders held in store for the man of the future by advances in technology. However, today many people are becoming aware that having a more advanced technology is not the answer to happiness. For it is becoming increasingly obvious that an unthinking proliferation of machinery could not only fail to improve the quality of life, but actually destroy it. Pollution and the separation of human considerations from decision-making are but two of the dangers inherent in over-industrialization. Science fiction writers, aware of these concerns, are beginning to rethink their attitudes toward technology. Harry Harrison has collected in this anthology fourteen stories that question the role of science. They are stories by writers who are concerned about their craft, concerned with breaking down the wall between science fiction and literature. And many are tales sparked by wit - deliberate humor becoming a characteristic of this new school. "The Sumerian Oath" by Philip Jose Farmer takes an iconoclastic look at physicians and discloses the best-kept secret of the medical profession. The end of the world is predicted in "East Wind, West Wind," not by fire or ice, but by air pollution. In this story by Frank M. Robinson, an Air Central Inspector doggedly searches for an outlawed gasoline combustion automobile - our present-day car that has become the symbol both of destruction and freedom. Robert Sheckley laughs in the face of his own apocalyptic vision in "Zirn Left Unguarded, The Jenghik Palace in Flames, Jon Westerly Dead." The menace hidden in constant improvements in home entertainment is demonstrated in "The Poet in the Hologram in the Middle of Prime Time," by Ed Bryant. Here, a holovision is developed that will enable viewers to become participants in the shows that they watch. These are but four stories in this unusual collection that heralds a new direction in the literature of science fiction."

Original Publication: Walker & Walker, 1972
This Edition: Walker & Walker, 1972
Cover Art: Enrico Scull
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Zim Left Unguarded, the Jenghuk Palace in Flames, Jon Westerley Dead by Robert Sheckley, East Wind, West Wind by Frank M. Robinson, The Sumerian Oath by Philip Jose Farmer, Now+n Now-n by Robert Silverberg, Two Odysseys Into the Center by Barry N. Malzberg, Darkness by Andre Carneiro, On the Wheel by Damon Knight, Miss Omega Raven by Naomi Mitchison, The Poet in the Hologram in the Middle of Prime Time by Edward Bryant, The Old Folks by James E. Gunn, The Steam-Driven Boy by John Sladek, I Tell You, It's True by Poul Anderson, And I Have Come Upon This Place by Lost Ways by James Tiptree, Jr. and The Ergot Show by Brian W. Aldiss

Review:


Astounding: John W. Campbell Memorial Anthology

"The editor of this volume has written the following tribute: "In the early summer of 1971, I was asked to write a brief obituary to be published in Analog. I began it this way: It is with the most profound sadness that I must report that John W. Campbell is dead. For thirty-four years he was the editor of this magazine, guiding it with a firm hand from its origins in the pulps of a past era to its present stature. In shaping this journal he shaped all of modern science fiction, so that, in many ways, this entire body of literature is his memorial. "This book is a memorial of a different kind. It is a group project, a spontaneous decision by a number of writers who decided that a special tribute was needed for this editor and friend who had been such a large part of our lives. John Campbell loved his work, and it is obvious that his magazine was as much a part of him as he was of it. What better tribute could there be than to bring out what might be called the last issue of the magazine he edited, an anthology of stories he might, perhaps, echo more of Astounding and Unknown than of Analog. History chose the writers who are represented here, and they in turn wrote the kind of stories they knew best how to do: Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Hal Clement, Theodore R. Cogswell, L. Sprague de Camp, Gordon R. Dickson, Harry Harrison, Mack Reynolds, Clifford D. Simak, George O. Smith, Theodore Sturgeon, Theodore L. Thomas. It has been my pleasure to assemble these stories in book form and to handle the mechanics of preparation for book publication. My responsibility stops there; we would have it no other way. "You see, we all know who the real editor was."

Original Publication: Random House, November 1973
This Edition: Random House, November 1973
Cover Art: John Sposato
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction: The Father of Science Fiction by Isaac Asimov, Lodestar by Poul Anderson, Thiotimoline to the Stars by Isaac Asimov, Something Up There Likes Me by Alfred Bester, Lecture Demonstration by Hal Clement, Early Bird by Theodore R. Cogswell and Theodore L. Thomas, The Emperor's Fan by L. Sprague de Camp, Brothers by Gordon R. Dickson, The Mothballed Spaceship by Harry Harrison, Black Sheep Astray by Mack Reynolds, Epilog by Clifford D. Simak, Interlude by George O. Smith, Helix the Cat by Theodore Sturgeon, Probability Zero! The Population Implosion by Theodore R. Cogswell and Afterword by Harry Harrison

Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Saves the World

"Slippery Jim di Griz, a living legend as The Stainless Steel Rat, now outdoes even himself. Someone is meddling with time. People are fading from existence - first, members of The Special Corps which (reluctantly) employs him, then Jim's wife and sons. The source of the meddling is located in the distant past - the year 1984 - in an ancient, forgotten nation called "The United States of America." He has no choice, does The Stainless Steel Rat. If he is to save his family and himself, he must go there, through time, and save the world!"

Original Publication: Putnam, 1972
This Edition: Berkley Medallion, December 1973
Cover Art: Richard Powers
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Following are excerpts from the autobiography Harry Harrison! Harry Harrison! about the Stainless Steel Rat series. I highly recommend the Rat books as good solid entertainment. Harry apparently enjoyed writing them and I have completely enjoyed reading them.

"My first sale to John Campbell was "The Stainless Steel Rat," a short story that appeared in the August 1957 issue of Astounding. It introduced a character - James Bolivar "Slippery Jim" diGritz - who would stay with me for the next fifty-five years."

"I was in New York and making the transition from "Harry the artist" to being a writer...At that time there was a mouse in my apartment; it used to steal my cereal. I'd catch it and shove it in a paper bag and release it up on the roof, and by the time I got back to my typewriter he was back in the cereal box! I'm pretty sure that the idea came up in a conversation with Katherine [MacLean] that while we have flesh-and-blood mice in our apartments, in the future they will have steel mice, or she may have said mechanical mice. I'm happy to give her credit for that idea, because I was able to put it together with an idea I'd had in mind for an antihero in the future."

"I write stories I would like to read, and I'd always admired Rupert of Hentzau from Anthony Hope's The Prisoner of Zenda. It's a wonderful device to have the villain as hero. Raffles was a real criminal in the early stories, then along came morality and he confessed his sins and the series faded away. I wanted to have a real Rupert of Hentzau type, who gets away in the end and gives everybody the finger! That sort of character, a criminal who's good at his job, has much more dimension to it, and you can explore things like that Rat's opposition to violence; I wanted to have a hero who doesn't believe in killing people."


Review:


Astounding: John W. Campbell Memorial Anthology

"A final salute to John W. Campbell, editor extraordinaire, by the writers he developed in Astounding Science Fiction."

Original Publication: Random House, November 1973
This Edition: Ballantine, December 1974
Cover Art: Kelly Freas
Format: Paperback

Notes:

The cover art is from October 1953 Astounding Science Fiction and was the first published cover art by Frank Kelly Freas. Interior artwork also by Freas. Contents: The Father of Science Fiction by Isaac Asimov, Lodestar by Poul Anderson, Thiotimoline to the Stars by Isaac Asimov, Something Up There Likes Me by Alfred Bester, Lecture Demonstration by Hal Clement, Early Bird by Theodore R. Cogswell, The Emperor's Fan by L. Sprague de Camp, Brothers by Gordon Dickson, The Mothballed Spaceship by Harry Harrison, Black Sheep Astray by Mack Reynolds, Epilog by Clifford Simak, Interlude by George O. Smith, Helix the Cat by Theodore Sturgeon and Probability Zero: The Population Implosion by Theodore R. Cogswell

Review:


Nova 2

"Tales of our Tomorrows.Nova - an exploding star. Nova 2 - fourteen explosive stars of science fiction, brought together by Harry Harrison. Stories from the finest writers of three continents, in a single volume for the first time - the best of science fiction today."

Original Publication: Walker & Co., 1972
This Edition: Dell, April 1974
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: Introduction by Harry Harrison, Zim Left Unguarded, the Jenghik Palace in Flames, Jon Westerly Dead by Robert Sheckley, "East Wind, West Wind" by Frank M. Robinson, The Sumerian Oath by Philip Jose Farmer, Now+n Now-n by Robert Silverberg, Two Odysseys Into the Center by Barry N. Malzberg, Darkness by Andre Carneiro, On the Wheel by Damon Knight, Miss Omega Raven by Naomi Mitchison, The Poet in the Hologram in the Middle of Prime Time by Edward Bryant, The Old Folks by James E. Gunn, The Steam-Driven Boy by John Sladek, I Tell You, It's True by Poul Anderson, And I Have Come Upon This Place by Lost Ways by James Tiptree, Jr. and The Ergot Show by Brian W. Aldiss

Review:


The Outdated Man (formerly Nova 3)

"What's this world coming to? Thirteen terrific and terrifying new science fictional ways to really get into and out of this world (and other spaces), deftly devised by the superstars of the genre. Brian W. Aldiss, Hank Dempsey, Philip Jose Farmer, Barry N. Malzberg, Naomi Mitchison, Robert Sheckley, David R. Bunch, Scott Edelstein, DIck Glass, Dean McLaughlin, Mack Reynolds, Philip Shofner, Norman Spinrad....Edited by Harry Harrison."

Original Publication: Dell, April 1975
This Edition: Dell, April 1975
Cover Art: Carl Lundgren
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Variant title of Nova 3. Contents: Introduction by Harry Harrison, Welcome to the Standard Nightmare by Robert Sheckley, The Expensive Delicate Ship by Brian W. Aldiss, Dreaming and Conversions: Two Rules by Which to Live by Barry N. Malzberg, Breakout in Ecol 2 by David R. Bunch, The Cold War...Continued by Mack Reynolds, The Factory by Naomi Mitchison, The Defensive Bomber by Harry Harrison (as by Hank Dempsey), Endorsement, Personal by Dean McLaughlin, The National Pasttime by Norman Spinrad, The Ultimate End by Dick Glass, Pity the Poor Outdated Man by Philip Shofner, The Exhibition by Scott Edelstein and Sketches Among the Ruins of My Mind by Philip Jose Farmer

Review:


Montezuma's Revenge

"A priceless da Vinci painting, supposedly destroyed during World War II, miraculously appeared in Mexico. The Agency sent art expert Tony Hawkin to find out what the hell was going on down there. But what started as a holiday jaunt, soon become a mad escapade that was as hilarious as it was deadly. In a nightmare comedy of errors, professional agents from Isreal, Italy, and Germany closed in on a poor, bumbling Hawkin. It was a death trap for the timid art investigator and only an illogical amateur could hope to survive the muderously inept Mexican Connection"

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1972
This Edition: Manor Books, 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Nova 4

"How we meet the challenges of today will greatly affect the future. Nova 4 presents questions and possible answers, when: *Computers rule a demoralized society. *The first inventor of a time machine keeps running into selves from other times. *A mysterious force inhabits children of a backwoods community - with murderous results. All new interpretations of the human (and inhuman) condition by award-winners: *Brian Aldiss *Alfred Bester *Barry Malzberg *Kit Reed *Robert Sheckley Plus talented new writers who appear here for the first time."

Original Publication: Walker & Co, 1974
This Edition: Manor Books, 1975
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Monsters of Ingratitude IV by Brian W. Aldiss, Songs of War by Kit Reed, Protective Temporal Strike by Gerard E. Giannattasio, Making it All the Way into the Future on Gaxton Falls of the Red Planet by Barry N. Malzberg, Slaves of Time by Robert Sheckley, Singular by Bill Garnett, Too Long at the Fair by Edward Wellen, Not a Petal Falls by Richard Bireley, My Affair with Science Fiction by Alfred Bester, Out of the Waters by Naomi Mitchison, Side View of a Circle by Michael Addobati, Beyond the Cleft by Tom Reamy, Our Lady of the Endless Sky by Jeff Duntemann and Afterword by Harry Harrison

Review:


Captive Universe

"Behold the fool: Chimal. Everyone knows that the world is a hold in a Universe of stone, but Chimal seeks to defy the priests, leave the valley, and provoke the wrath of the Great Designer and Why? Because he is a fool. Only a fool would believe what these Watchmen say - that the world is a stone in a universe of Hole!"

Original Publication: G.P. Putnam's Sons, February 1969
This Edition: Berkley, 1976
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The 9th Annual Best SF: 75

"Science fiction has long outgrown its original self-imposed boundaries. It has expanded its demands for ingenuity, vigor and imagination and, in turn, has attracted writers whose illimitable imaginations have turned the genre into a force of startling creativity. Nowhere is this more evident than in the barometric series created by Harrison and Aldiss in their annual BEST SF anthologies. And nowhere are there more exemplary examples of this creativity than in the BEST SF:75. Some of the stories, challenging man's injustices and idiosyncrasies, are savagely satirical. They are provocative, disquieting, mind-stunning. Others sheathe their knives in humor, in gentle ridiculings of men's minds and they wobble in their orbits. Among the authors included are John Updike, Algis Budrys, Barry Malzberg, Joe Haldeman, Thomas Disch, Richard Cowper and Michael Moorcock. Framing the collection are a thoughtful forward by Harrison and, as an afterword, a survey of the contemporary sf scene by Aldiss. Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss are both well-known men of letters, and have contributed much to the science fiction corpus. The one now maintains his abode in Dublin; the other remains faithful to his Oxonian environs."

Original Publication: Orbit/Futura, June 1976
This Edition: Bobbs-Merrill Company, September 1976
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Chaste Planet by John Updike, The Custodians by Richard Cowper, A Galaxy Called Rome by Barry N. Malzberg, A Scraping at the Bones by Algis Budrys, End Game by Joe Haldeman, The Linguist by Stephen Robinett (as by Tak Hallus), Changelings by Lisa Tuttle, The Santa Claus Compromise by Thomas M. Disch, Settling the World by M. John Harrison, A Dead Singer by Michael Moorcock, The Lop-Eared Cat that Devoured Philadelphia by Louis Phillips, A Twelvemonth by Peter Redgrove, Afterword: Science Fiction on the Titanic by Brian W. Aldiss and Introduction by Harry Harrison

Review:


Deathworld 2

"The stakes were slavery - or the life of Jason Dinalt. The planet was unknown a savagely primitive place where every man had to kill every other man - or live as a slave. The inhabitants lived in the early Bronze Age one minute, and in the early machine age the next. Technology had degenerated into a number of mysteries jealously guarded by separate brotherhoods. But Jason dinAlt was a gambler. He realized that if he was ever going to get a winning hand in this game, the brotherhoods would need a shuffle..."

Original Publication: Bantam, September 1964
This Edition: Sphere, March 1977
Cover Art: Peter Elson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Lifeship

"Castaways between the stars Trapped in the confines of their fragile lifeship, a tiny band of aliens and humans faces the awesome challenge of survival after the mysterious explosion of a giant spaceship. Giles Steel, member of Earth's master race, assumes responsibility for erupting tempers, the dwindling food supply...and the saboteur whose ugly work had already begun!"

Original Publication: Harper & Row, May 1976
This Edition: Pocket, June 1977
Cover Art: Ed Soyka
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Adventures of the Stainless Steel Rat

"From the author of The Deathworld Trilogy - a trio of topflight SF adventures in one volume! Meet James Bolivar diGriz - con man par excellence in a universe full of suckers. He's a self-styled stainless steel rat, living by his wits in the wain-scoting of a ferroconcrete/stainless steel civilization, and leading a highly lucrative, wholly satisfying life of larceny in the midst of an almost crime-free society. But "Slippery Jim" slips up in The Stainless Steel Rat - or rather gets caught in a better than average rat trap set by an interplanetary law enforcement agency: the Special Corps. Harold Inskipp, the Corp's head man (an ex-criminal himself who knows all the tricks) persuades diGriz to lend his talents to the forces of justice - outlining a few unpleasant alternatives. It's an offer a stainless steel rat can hardly refuse. Besides Jim actually has a great deal of respect for the Corps' humanitarian motives and modus operandi (after all they'd managed to snare him). His only concern is that Corps basic training is so boringly basic; no one is willing to give the new guy a first-class assignment. So he gives himself one, sniffing out an ingenious plot to build an illegal space war ship. And tracking down a criminal whose cunning, ruthlessness and audacity are exceeded by only her beauty. In the Stainless Steel Rat's Revenge, James diGriz is just settling into a married life with his beloved Angelina (a tempestuous rehabilitated murderess) when Inskipp once again interrupts pleasure with business. Just another routine suicide mission. The planet Cliaand had invaded and conquered its two sister worlds and five other planets in neighboring systems - despite the fact that interstellar warfare was theoretically impossible. All Jim had to do was penetrate Cliaand's incredibly tight security, infiltrate their sophisticated military network, sabotage the next invasion...and survive. The Stainless Steel Rat Saves the World - and even for resourceful veteran J.B. diGriz that's no small feat. Someone, somewhere, is tampering with time - a chillingly effective way to eliminate the Special Corps, not to mention the rest of humanity - and Slippery Jim's only chance to stop the fiend is to travel 30,000 years into the past, back to the primitive days of the late 20th century. Wild action, wry humor, The Adventures of the Stainless Steel Rat is Harry Harrison in top form!"

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, December 1977
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, December 1977
Cover Art: Gary Viskupic
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: The Stainless Steel Rat, The Stainless Steel Rat's Revenge and The Stainless Steel Rat Saves the World

Review:


Bill, The Galactic Hero

"On the good ship Christine Keeler he was just plain Bill, enrolled in a correspondence course for a career as Technical Fertilizer Operator down on the farm, until a recruiting robot turned his head with visions of bright nebula lights, snappy red uniforms and a cup of deep-space knockout drops and Bill suddenly found himself aboard the Empire Space Ship Christine Keeler, fighting the Empire's war against the lizard-like Chingers. But an act of accidental heroism won him the Purple Dart (and an all-expenses paid trip to fabulous Helior, the aluminum-plated Sin City of the Empire) and that's when Bill's adventures really began. In Bill, The Galactic Hero, distinguished sf novelist Harry Harrison best known for his remarkable novels Deathworld and Make Room! Make Room! (the basis of Soylent Green) combines the monumental trappings of the greatest epoch-spanning sf classics with the rich Harrison wit, to produce a stunning satirical tour-de-force."

Original Publication: Doubleday, 1965
This Edition: Avon, November 1979
Cover Art: McMacken
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Wants You

"James Bolivar diGriz, criminal-virtuoso-turned-undercover-agent, had never been one to quail in the face of danger. Therefore, when his lovely, larcenous wife, Angelina, was kidnapped by the cruelest organization in the galaxy - Interstellar Internal and External Revenue (IIER) - he wasted no time in formulating a scheme to free her. Unfortunately, even though he had the aid of his talented sons, James and Bolivar (whom he'd arranged to have graduate a little ahead of time from the Dorsky Military Boarding School and Penitentiary), things didn't go according to plan. The trio broke into IIER's headquarters easily enough, but they set off an alarm in the process - which not only meant that Angelina's rescue had to be postponed, but also that the boys had to wipe clean the family's tax records on their own while their father created an appropriate diversion. It was thoroughly enjoyable escapade for the senior stainless steel rat, and "Slippery Jim's" exhilaration was not diminished when, some time later, he was taken into custody. But the fun stopped there. For instead of hauling him off to prison, diGriz's captors took him to an unfamiliar building across town...where his boss, Harold Inskipp - the hard-nosed, humorless head of the Interplanetary Special Corps - was waiting to hand him a tricky, very possibly suicidal assignment. After grudgingly assuring Jim that Angelina was out of jail, Inskipp outlined that much more serious problem currently facing the Corps. A satellite base which had been hosting a major meeting of the League Navy chiefs of staff had vanished without a trace, leaving League defenses in a dangerously disorganized state. It was up to diGriz to find out what had happened in the satellite, and who was responsible. The first part of the puzzle wasn't at all difficult for him to solve. A quick jump backward in time revealed that the satellite and its occupants had been swallowed by a huge, toothy something. But when it came to following the something back to its home base, the situation became a bit more hairy...or rather, scaly. Because the attack on the satellite was merely the first move in what was destined to become an all-out intergalactic war - between Mankind and an unholy union of slimy, stalk-eyed, multi-limbed and oozy-tentacled alien races...who had decided that human beings were just too dry and ugly to exist!"

Original Publication: Michael Joseph, September 1978
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday, May 1979
Cover Art: D.K. Stone
Format: Hardback

Notes:

From West of Eden. An Interview with Harry Harrison by Neil Gaiman - "Well all that came from my subconscious, you know. There are all these ugly tentacled things, so they build this slimy pustulated tentacle suit for the Rat to get into - it's the ugliest thing you've seen in your life - to penetrate the alien defenses. So he's approaching the alien planet, and there's one of these revolting aliens on his viewscreen, and it was meant to say 'Who are you, why are you entering our space?' all that stuff. Instead I found myself typing 'Hello, cutie?' My evil subconscious had noticed that to these things this creature was cute! The whole book changes at that point - it went from a normal book to a case of absolute fucking hysteria! I was laughing as I wrote it! It was absolute nonsense, just one joke after another - it possessed me. But that was the one line that started it all."

Review:


Planet of No Return

"Deep in the alien, star-filled heavens, the ultimate battle rages on Selm II, one of the last planets settled before the collapse of the Earth Empire, is now a shattered and mysterious world - a planet programmed for destruction. And the new and more powerful guardian of the galaxy, the Cultural Relationships Foundation, is determined to find out why. Brion Brandd, a man of Herculean strength of body and mind, and Lea, his voluptuous and resourceful mate, are selected by CRF to save Selm II from certain doom. Their terrifying mission takes them to the heart of a super space-age battle where machine is pitted against machine. Selm II is a world gone mad: The skies are filled with flames and fiery jet explosions...The jungles are inhabited by flying reptiles and brutal bestial men lying in ambush...The barren plains are littered with huge engines of war and once-flourishing cities lie in ruin...Who or what controls the game of death on Selm II? Who or what is at the source of violence, hatred and fear? Seeking the answers, seeking the enemies they cannot see, Brion and Lea edge ever closer to the unholy Holy Place - and to the dark and deadly secret of the Planet of No Return. A novel of fantastic spectacle and adventure....The fully illustrated sequel to Planet of the Damned!"

Original Publication: Wallaby/Simon & Shuster, August 1981
This Edition: Wallaby/Simon & Shuster, August 1981
Cover Art: Michael Whelan
Format: Trade Paperback

Notes:

Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat for President

"This time the Special Corps has given the Rat a daring assignment - liberate a backward tourist planet from the clutches of an aging dictator. With his lovely but lethal wife, Angelina, and his two stalwart sons, James and Bolivar, diGriz pits ballots in the fight for freedom. He's vowed to restore truth, justice and democracy to the world of Paraiso-Aqui, if he has to lie, cheat and steal to do it!"

Original Publication: Sphere, 1982
This Edition: Bantam, December 1982
Cover Art: Gary LoSasso
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


To the Stars

"A breathtaking adventure trilogy from the author of The Deathworld Trilogy and The Adventures of the Stainless Steel Rat, To the Stars gives a vivid, startling look into the 25th century - a rigid society, with the wealth and freedom of a small elite supported by the powerless proles, who eke out a hardscrabble existence on Earth and its colonies. Homeworld introduces us to Jan Kulozik, an upper-class engineer who has taken his privileges for granted. While vacationing at a luxurious resort in the Middle East, he nearly drowns in a sailboat accident, but an illegal Israeli submarine saves him. Kulozik's rescuers make him unwillingly recognize the suffering of most of the planet's inhabitants, and the Israelis reveal the existence of an underground movement, which is struggling to topple society's current balance of power. Jan must choose between the comfort and safety of his former life and the dangers toward which his conscience is urging him. Ten years later, in Wheelworld, Jan has been banished from Earth, exiled to the inflexible tribal society of Halvmork, which helps supply Earth's agricultural needs. Unhappy with his lot, Jan is nonetheless resigned, until the crucial cargo ships fail to arrive from Earth. Then, Halvmork's only hope for survival is Jan's organization of a daring, greuling mass exodus against incredible odds...In Starworld, Jan returns to Earth and finds himself caught between the underground and Earth's government. The Earth colonies have rebelled, and Earth is desperately struggling to retain its tyrannical hold over them. Jan is caught in a series of fast-paced espionage and counter-espionage episodes. His goal: to destroy the vestiges of power among what were once Earth's reigning elite. And he is the one person who can save the planet."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, May 1981
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, May 1981
Cover Art: Clyde Caldwell
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Contents: Homeworld, Wheelworld and Starworld all by Harry Harrison

Review:


Invasion: Earth

Original Publication: Ace, April 1982
This Edition: Ace, April 1982
Cover Art: David Schleinkofer
Format: Trade Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Starworld

"After centuries of tyranny, Earth's far-flung star colonies have risen in rebellion and broken the chains of their oppression. But Earth itself remains an armed camp where millions suffer and freedom is forgotten. Exiled rebel leader Jan Kulozik, returning to his home world as a prisoner, escapes to join forces with the leaders of the underground resistance. From the ghettos of 23rd century America to free the state of Israel, to a ragged rebel battle fleet in space, Jan rekindles the fires of revolt to lead the people of Earth toward the promise of liberty. Harry Harrison, author of West of Eden and Make room! Make room!, is one of science fictions most popular and widely read authors. To the Stars is his epic saga of mankind's and reclaim the stars."

Original Publication: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, May 1981
This Edition: Bantam, October 1984
Cover Art: Frank Morris
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Stainless Steel Visions

"Assembled here are fourteen of Harrison's best, spanning time and space from the England of old to empires millennia from now. Among the stories included are "The Golden Years of the Stainless Steel Rat," in which the cops have finally caught up with an aging Slippery Jim diGriz; "Roommates," the original basis for the movie Soylent Green; and twelve more galaxy-spanning classics! From the bestselling West of Eden trilogy to Bill, the Galactic Hero and its sequels, from the Deathworld series to the Stainless Steel Rat books, Harry Harrison's career is a series of landmarks. Stainless Steel Visions is another: his first major collection of short fiction."

Original Publication: Tor, March 1993
This Edition: Tor, February 1994
Cover Art: Keith Parkinson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: The Streets of Ashkelon, Toy Shop, Not Me, Not Amos Cabot!, The Mothballed Spaceship, Commando Raid, The Repairman, Brave Newer World, The Secret of Stonehenge, Rescue Operation, Portrait of the Artist, Survival Planet, Roommates and The Golden Years of the Stainless Steel Rat

Review:


Homeworld

"Jan Kuloziki was one of Earth's privileged elite. A brilliant young electronics engineer, he enjoyed all the blessings of a 23rd-century civilization that survived global collapse and conquered the stars unaware of the millions who slaved or starved to maintain his way of life. Then Jan met Sara, a beautiful agent of the rebel underground dedicated to smashing Earth's rigid caste system. Through her he discovered the truth behind the lies he'd been taught. His every move watched by state surveillance, Jan risked his position and his life to restore humanity's heritage."

Original Publication: Bantam, November 1980
This Edition: Bantam, August 1984
Cover Art: Frank Morris
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Wheelworld

"Branded a rebel and a traitor, Jan Kulozik was exiled by Earth's oppressive masters to serve as engineer to the agricultural colony world of Halvmark. Here on this harsh, unforgiving planet turning slowly from endless day to endless night, Jan found tens of thousands of people working as virtual slaves to feed earth's millions, under the brutal rule of a handful of powerful families. Then the lifeline to Earth was cut and Halvmark was plunged into chaos. Jan Kulozik rallied the people for their own survival, setting out on a perilous trek beset by treachery, sabotage and the fury of nature, to lead the people of Wheelworld to their new destiny."

Original Publication: Bantam, March 1981
This Edition: Bantam, September 1984
Cover Art: Frank Morris
Format: Paperback

Notes:

From a 1975 interview for Tangent by Dave Truesdale & Paul McGuire III - "I'm in the middle of a book I think will be called Wheelworld. I hope to finish it this month...I got the mad idea for this book while I was driving on the freeway. All those cars and trucks rushing by - all the wheels. You know, what if the entire world drove around in 40-trucks all day! My god! So my problem was to justify this. So you have a really hot world with a big axial tilt, with a big oblate orbit. There are two continents and they have terraforming you know, but instead of a mountain chain in between them they have a road between them, on this farming world. They have a big empire, and what they do - I think they have a four-or five-year cycle - is for a year or two they're in there farming like crazy, putting all this stuff in granaries, and then the ships come and take it away to the other continent. By now, they're in a kind of twilight zone, just a touch of twilight, say 85 of 100 degrees. Direct sunlight is 186 degrees or something, you know. And before too long they kill all these cows, a few calves or something, take a sperm bank, take the seed corn, and they live in trailers, big atomic trucks - and they've got a 40-foot wide road, 12,000 miles long, and they take off in these trucks and away they go, VROOOMMM, VROOOMMM, before the new weather gets them. Wow! Every American's dream. Sitting behind this big machine with the wheel over their heads!"

Review:


West of Eden

Original Publication: Bantam, August 1984
This Edition: Bantam, August 1984
Cover Art: David Schleinkofer
Format: Hardback

Notes:

From West of Eden. An Interview with Harry Harrison by Neil Gaiman - "Well, there are times in your life when you have an idea that transcends what came before it. And this idea - what if dinosaurs hadn't died out seventy million years ago? What would the world be like? I could have just tossed it away on a short novel, in a year, but instead...you see, the thing is that SF is full of closet readers - like full professors who teach PhD courses - who are SF fans. So with a few of these friends I worked out the entire world first. A world in which intelligent dinosaurs exist, and then within that works I wrote the book. And having been around a long time, I had the time, and the energy, and with thirty-two books in print, the money, to stay alive for three or four years while not writing a book a year, but to take three or four years off and really write to the best of my ability. So I worked my ass off and wrote what I hope is a fairly good novel. You never get it all the way...close enough is good enough....I really researched them [dinosaurs]! I worked with Professor Jack Cohen, of Birmingham University. He's the world expert on fertilization. Working with him I found out more about those rotten lizards than I care to know...With the aid of a really good biologist and a really good linguist I built the most ailen aliens ever seen from the creatures we saw today in the Natural History Museum."

Following are excerpts from the autobiography Harry Harrison! Harry Harrison! about the book West of Eden. This is my all time favorite Harry Harrison novel, evidenced by the fact I named one of my children Kerrick, after the main character.

"Book ideas grow and develop and it is very difficult to pin the genesis down with any degree of accuracy, but with West of Eden I remember the whole process. I got the idea from a television documentary that showed what an intelligent dinosaur would look like today. It was a very obvious idea. In fact, on my shelf I had a few nonfiction books about the same thing, so the idea had been around for a long time. But no one had ever done it in fiction."

"I thought about it and I thought it was too big an idea to throw away in a single book. The size of the thing - it is now sixty-five millions years later and we have intelligent dinosaurs. Now where did they come from? What happened there? Where is mankind?"

"I was talking to Tom Shippey about it, and I said: "Why don't I get some professional help? Perhaps a professional from every field?" I approached Jack Cohen, an eminent reproductive biologist, to talk to me about all things biological to do with intelligent dinosaurs...Tom and Jack and I met in Birmingham to have a meal and do some work. Jack had a couple of geckos there. They would sit and not even move their eyes..There is an innate fear of lizards in most human beings. I didn't know that. Right away we had the idea that each species fears the other one. That goes in the plot."

"When I had a query, instead of trying to answer it myself, I'd go to a specialist and they'd do it for me..I was accused by the feminists of being anti-woman because of the Yilane. But it came out of creating the opposite of the humans at all times. So the females must be dominant. There are an awful lot of lizards and amphibians that go into a torpid state. There is also one species of frog where the male carries the eggs on the back of his neck. Another carried the eggs in his mouth. So I had a torpid period when the Yilane males are pregnant. And if they're torpid when they're pregnant, that makes the females dominant, as they must protect them. Biology has assigned the "female role" to the men and the "male" to the women."

"So I thought, why don't I do a biological-based science? I would have to go all the way. There will be no fire. Everything is done biologically and chemically. I worked with Jack on that. Tom Shippey built the language. Leon Stover sorted out the anthropology."


Review:


West of Eden

"Imagine the world as it might have been the world West of Eden. From a master of imaginative storytelling comes an epic tale of the world as it might have been, a world where the age of dinosaurs never ended, and their descendants clashed with a clan of humans in a tragic war for survival. It is the take of Kerrick, a young hunter who grows to manhood among the dinosaurs, escaping at last to rejoin his own kind. His knowledge of their strange customs makes him the humans' leader, the dinosaurs' most feared enemy. Rivaling Frank Herbert's Dune in the majesty of its scope and conception, Harry Harrison's bestselling West of Eden is a monumental epic of love and savagery, bravery and hope."

Original Publication:Bantam, August 1984
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, July 1985
Cover Art: David Schleinkofer
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


One Step From Earth

"What if we could transfer objects, even people across the galaxy in the blink of an eye? What hidden secrets would it reveal? What deadly dangers would it conceal? Will any part of human life be the same when the vastness of the Universe lies only One Step from Earth"

Original Publication: Macmillan, 1970
This Edition: Tor, September 1985
Cover Art: Tom Kidd
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Contents: In the Beginning, One Step from Earth, Pressure, No War, or Battle's Sound, Wife to the Lord, Waiting Place, The Life Preservers, From Fanaticism, or for Reward, Heavy Duty and A Tale of Ending

Review:


Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers

"Chuck and Jerry, two fun-loving students at an American College discover a faster-than-light space drive and smuggle it into the football team's plane. They, together with the lovely Sally Goodfellow, drusty Pop and loveable old John view with horror a practical joke gone awry as the plane screams off to Titan, a frozen moon of Saturn. But that's only the beginning. When loveable old John's true and awful identity becomes known, a wild battle across the Universe and through centuries ensues, catapultine friends and deadly foes into the midst of a yarn spun from the grandest tradition of the classic 'space opera.'"

Original Publication: Putnam, December 1973
This Edition: Orbit, 1976
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Winter in Eden

"Two bold cultures struggle for survival Winter in Eden. Harry Harrison, an acknowledged master of imaginative fiction, broke new ground with West of Eden. He brought to vivid life the world as it might have been, where dinosaurs survived, where their intelligent descendants challenged humans for mastery of Earth, where a young hunter named Kerrick grew among the dinosaurs and rose to become their most feared enemy. Now, the awesome saga continues in Winter in Eden A new ice age threatens Earth. Facing extinction, the dinosaurs must employ their mastery of biology to swiftly reconquer human territory. Desperately, Kerrick launches an arduous quest to rally a final defense for humankind. With his beloved wife and young son, he heads north to the land of the whale hunters, east into the enemy's stronghold, and south to a fateful reckoning with destiny. Not since Dune has there been a word of such majestic scope and conception a monumental epic of passion, courage and triumph."

Original Publication: Grafton, September 1986
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, September 1987
Cover Art: Jerry LoFaro
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Return to Eden

"In West of Eden and Winter in Eden, Master novelist Harry Harrison broke new ground with his most ambitious project to date. He brought to vivid life the world as it might have been, where dinosaurs survived, where their intelligent descendants, the Yilane, challenged humans for mastery of the Earth, and where the human Kerrick, a young hunter of the Tanu tribe, grew among the dinosaurs and rose to become their most feared enemy. Working in collaboration with an international team of scientific experts, Harrison created a believable, richly detailed world rivaling Frank Herbert's Dune and Jean Auel's The Clan of the Cave Bear in the majesty of its scope and conception. Now, in Return to Eden, Harrison brings the epic trilogy to a stunning conclusion. After Kerrick rescues his people from the warlike Yilane, they find a safe haven on an island and there begin to rebuild their shattered lives. But with fierce predators stalking the forests, how long can these unarmed human outcasts hope to survive? The small band of humans have no choice but to confront their fate head on. And, of course, Kerrick cannot forget Viante, his implacable Yilane enemy. She's been cast out from her kind, under sentence of death, but how long will her banishment last? For her strange attraction to Kerrick has turned into a hatred even more powerful than her instincts an obsession that compels her to hunt down Kerrick and kill them."

Original Publication: Bantam Spectra, August 1988
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, July 1989
Cover Art: Keith Parkinson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Skyfall

"Prometheus is the largest spacecraft ever built by man. A joint USA-USSR project, the gigantic ship weighs over 20,000 tons and many be the ultimate solution to the world's energy needs. Like its mythical namesake, who stole fire from the gods and gave it to mankind, Prometheus will capture the energy of the sun and beam it to Earth unless something goes terribly wrong. An unforeseen accident has stranded Prometheus in a decaying orbit less than a hundred miles above the Earth. Its small, international crew of men and women have a day, maybe less, before they come crashing down with their ship. But there's more at stake than a few astronaut's lives. Prometheus is too immense to burn up on reentry. When it hits, history's greatest endeavor will become the world's biggest bomb!"

Original Publication: Faber & Faber, September 1976
This Edition: Tor, September 1990
Cover Art: Tony Roberts
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Review:


Bill The Galactic Hero on the Planet of Tasteless Pleasure

"He's the perfect Spaceship Trooper: big, strong, and completely brainwashed. He's the perfect hero: willing to do almost anything to save his neck (perhaps one of the only body parts that's still his own). Bill is in the hospital, vainly hoping for a real foot to replace the satyr's foot he's been lumbered with. Not tha the has anything against satyrs - at least not until one grabs him by the foot and pulls him under the ocean. Into a world of unspeakable and endless pleasures! Roaming this dimension of primortial desires, Bill faces dragons and gunslingers for the sake of true love - and a really good beer! Harry Harrison, the best-selling author of West of Eden and The Stainless Steel rat, teams up with David Bischoff, author of War Games, to send Bill, the galactic hero, reluctantly through time, space and sobriety."

Original Publication: Avon, January 1991
This Edition: Avon, January 1991
Cover Art: Michael Wm. Kaluta and Steven Fastner
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration wth David Bischoff

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Bill The Galactic Hero on the Planet of Ten Thousand Bars

"He's the perfect Starship trooper: big, strong, and completely brainwashed. He's the perfect hero: willing to do almost anything to save his neck (perhaps one of the only body parts that's still his own). Now he's ben sent to Barworld, home planet of the finest beverages in the universe. Can Bill survive an entire planet of blondes, booze, and bathtubs of champagne? If he does, he has to find a Time Portal and stop an evil conspiracy from taking over the world of comix! Will Bill survive the assassin-hippies? Will he swallow the foaming lies of Barworld's existence? Will he ever discover the meaning of life? Find out - On the Planet of Ten Thousand Bars!"

Original Publication: Avon, September 1991
This Edition: Avon, September 1991
Cover Art: Mark Pacella
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration wth David Bischoff

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Bill The Galactic Hero: The Final Incoherent Adventure!

"He's the perfect starship trooper: big, strong and completely brainwashed. He's the perfect hero: willing to do almost anything to save his neck (perhaps one of the only body parts that's still his own). Now he's been recruited by Captain Kadaffi - better known as Captain Cadaver - for a suicide mission on the planet Eyerack. Bill has orders to die trying, but trying what he doesn't know. Will Bill really lead the suicide mission to Eyerack? WIll he survive the bombs, blondes and booze? WIll he ever find a foot?"

Original Publication: Avon, September 1991
This Edition: Avon, September 1991
Cover Art: Mark Pacella and Steve Fastner
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration wth David Harris

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The Turing Option

"The android held up the end of the fiber optic cable. Of course - a connection between their brains would be completely secure and untappable. They had never communicated before in this manner, but Sven could find the metal stud under his skin, insert the cable. Not for an instant did Brian consider that there was any danger in the process. He simply sat with his back to the MI. Felt the familiar tracery of spider fingers on his skin. Felt completely secure in the embrace of his own creation"

Original Publication: Warner, August 1992
This Edition: Warner, August 1992
Cover Art: Carol Gillot
Format: Hardback

Notes:

Collaboration with Marvin Minsky

Review:


The Hammer and the Cross

"What if The Gods of Asgard challenged Christianity for the future of mankind? 865 A.D. Warring kinds rule over the British Isles, but the Church rules over the kings, threatening all who oppose them with damnation. Only the Dreaded Vikings of Scandinavia do not fear the priests. Shef, the bastard son of a Norse raider and a captive English lady is torn by divided loyalties and driven by strange visions that seem to come from Odin himself. A smith and warrior, he alone dares to imagine new weapons and tactics with which to carve out a kingdom and launch an all-out war between The Hammer and the Cross."

Original Publication: Legend, March 1993
This Edition: Tor, November 1994
Cover Art: Kevin Johnson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Interior illustrations by Bill Sanderson. Collaboration with Tom Shippey (as John Holm)

Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted

"The 25th century's most outrageous outlaw is back - and this time it means war! Slippery Jim DiGriz, better known as the Stainless Steel Rat is seeking revenge for the murder of his mentor-in-crime, the fabled archcriminal known as the Bishop. His trail leads to Nevenkebla and the iron-fisted dictator General Zennor - the kind of man who'd sell his own mother into slavery just to see the expression on her face. Now in the uniform of a Nevenkeblan soldier, Jim discovers Zennor's vile plan to enslave a defenseless planet. Only a man with a special code of honor - only a stainless steel rat - can save the world from the invading hoarde."

Original Publication: Dell, 1986
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, April 1994
Cover Art: Jean Pierre Targete
Format: Paperback

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The Stainless Steel Rat for President

"This time the Special Corps has given the Rat a daring assignment - liberate a backward tourist planet from the clutches of an aging dictator. With his lovely but lethal wife, Angelina, and his two stalwart sons, James and Bolivar, diGriz pits ballots against bullets in the fight for freedom. He's vowed to restore truth, justice and democracy to the world of Paradiso-Aqui, if he has to lie, cheat and steal to do it!"

Original Publication: Sphere, 1982
This Edition: Nelson Doubleday/Science Fiction Book Club, October 1984
Cover Art: Freff
Format: Paperback

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Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Sings the Blues

"He is incorrigible. He is conniving. And he is the greatest antihero ever to go rip-roaring through the future. He is Slippery Jim diGriz, thief; con man the Stainless Steel Rat. Harry Harrison's bestselling Stainless Steel Rat series has earned rave reviews and a legion of fans, and has catapulted the Rat himself, an antisocial rule breaker in an overcivilized world, to fame, if not fortune. Now the fabled futuristic criminal is back, in the long-awaited new adventure of intergalactic danger, intrigue, and - after a fashion - rock stardom. DiGriz is in the process of robbing the new Mint on Paskonjak when the heist goes terribly wrong. Threatened with a horrific death, Slippery Jim is allowed to cut a deal with the Galactic League: voyage to the planet Liokukae and bring back a missing artifact - the only known evidence of alien life-forms found in 32,000 years of galactic exploration. For diGriz there are a few catches. One is Liokukae itself - a dumping ground for the League's misfits, murderers, maniacs, and the incurably obnoxious. Another is a little matter of life and death. To ensure the utterly untrustworthy diGriz's cooperation, the League has given him a slow-acting poison, allowing him thirty days in which to succeed...or die. Now the Stainless Steel Rat is on his way to a world that is hurtling backward down the evolutionary scale - a land of fanatic, goat-herding Fundamentaloids, murderous Machmen, and a rusty guru named Iron John. DiGriz has developed an almost perfect cover: a four-member rock band that has a way of giving its audiences what they want to hear. But while the days tick away and diGriz's life expectancy lowers, the mission evolves from finding an artifact to liberating a planet...which is a tune the Stainless Steel Rat most certainly knows how to sing. Zany, irreverent, and hilarious, the Stainless Steel Rat series continues as the most entertaining futuristic performance ever staged. And in the Stainless Steel Rat Sings the Blues Harry Harrison takes the adventure to new levels of inventiveness and delight. In a career that spans three decades, Harry Harrison has written more than three dozen novels, including the Stainless Steel Rat novels and the classic Make Room! Make Room!, basis for the film Soylent Green, as well as West of Eden, Return to Eden and Winter in Eden. A past president of the World Science Fiction Association, he is also a noted anthologist, editing the acclaimed Nova series and co-editing the highly praised Decade and Year's Best SF volumes with British author Brian Aldiss. Born in Stamford, Connecticut, Harrison now lives with his wife in Ireland."

Original Publication: Bantam UK, March 1994
This Edition: Bantam Spectra/Science Fiction Book Club, June 1994
Cover Art: Jean Pierre Targete
Format: Hardback

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Galactic Dreams

"Collected here are twelve of Harrison's best, including Space Rats of the CCC, probably the greatest space opera ever written, slightly tongue-in-cheek; at last the true story of Frankenstein, in which our favorite monster gets new life but who's life is it?; Bill the Galactic Heroes Happy Holiday, in which our favorite drunkard enlistee is kidnapped by the evil Chingers and hypnotized into believing he is a general; and nine more classics ranging across time and space! From the best-selling West of Eden trilogy to the Stainless Steel Rat books, from the Deathworld trilogy to the rollicking fun of Bill, The Galactic Hero and its collaborative sequels, Harry Harrison's career is a series of landmarks. Galactic Dreams is another: his second major collection of short fiction in the last forty years."

Original Publication: Tor, April 1994
This Edition: Tor, May 1995
Cover Art: Keith Parkinson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Interior Artwork by Bryn Barnard. Contents: A Writer's Life, I Always Do What Teddy Says, Space Rats of the CCC, Down to Earth, A Criminal Act, Famous First Words, A Pad-A Story of the Day After the Day After Tomorrow, If, Mute Milton, Simulated Trainer, At Last, the True Story of Frankenstein, The Robot Who Wanted to Know and Bill, The Galactic Hero's Happy Holiday

Review:


One King's Way

"What if The Vikings conquered Britain and threatened the entire Christian world. A craftsman, visionary and warrior, Shef has risen from slavery to become king of a mighty Viking nation. But his growing kingdom menaces all of Europe, and he has made many powerful enemies. Chief among his enemies are the Knights of the Lance, a fanatical order of soldiers sworn to bring Shef down, no matter what the cost. To defeat Shef, they will go to extraordinary lengths to find the sacred spear of Christ and resurrect the Holy Roman Empire. Driven by dreams, Shef battles to change the course of history, but even the gods themselves may be plotting against him "

Original Publication: Legend, February 1995
This Edition: Tor, March 1996
Cover Art: Kevin Johnson
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Tom Shippey (as John Holm)

Review:


King and Emperor

"What if the Vikings battled Rome for the fate of the world? Driven by prophetic dreams, the Viking warrior Shef has become the One King, the undisputed ruler of the North. Now he must face the reborn power of the Holy Roman Empire. Rome threatens Shef' s fearsome Viking navy with a new invention of unparalleled destruction: Greek fire. Unable to defend his fleet against this awesome weapon, Shef travels east in search of new wisdom. His quest leads him to the lavish court of the Muslim Caliph and, ultimately, to the secret hiding place of the Holy Grail. The unforgettable conclusion to The Hammer and the Cross."

Original Publication: Tor, July 1996
This Edition: Tor, June 1997
Cover Art: Gary Ruddell
Format: Paperback

Notes:

Collaboration with Tom Shippey (as John Holm)

Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Goes to Hell

"Slippery Jim di Griz alias the Stainless Steel Rat, the galaxy's greatest thief and con artist, returns in his most devilish caper yet. DiGriz is strenuously fighting boredom on a ritzy pleasure planet when his beloved wife disappears while visiting the Temple of Eternal Truth, an enigmatic institution that promises its patrons a sneak peek at Heaven - for a price. Determined to get his wife back, diGriz takes on the temple. He thinks he's ready for anything, but he never expects to find himself banished to hell, complete with pointy-tailed devils. Has divine judgment caught up with the Rat at last? Of course not."

Original Publication: Tor, November 1996
This Edition: Tor, January 1997
Cover Art: Walter Velez
Format: Paperback

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Stars and Stripes Forever

"In this astounding epic of alternate history - a powerful blend of fact, fiction, and strategic possibilities - Harry Harrison poses a provocative what if scenario that would have changes the outcome of the U.S. Civil War - and the course of history. The result is an exciting, action-packed, hugely entertaining novel of war and weaponry on both sides of the atlantic. On November 8, 1861, in the Bahama Channel close to Cuba, a U.S. navy warship stopped a British packet, boarded her,a nd seized two Confederate emissaries on their way to England to seek backing for their cause. England responded with rage...and with calls for a war of vengeance. The looming crisis was defused by the peace-minded Prince Albert. But what if fate had intervened? Imagine how his absence during this critical moment might have changed everything. For lacking Alber's calm voice of reason, Britain now seizes the opportunity to attack and conquer a crippled, war-torn America. Ulysses S. Grant is poised for an attack that could smash open the South's defenses. In Washington, Abraham Lincoln sees a first glimmer of hope that this bloody war might soon end. But then disaster strikes: English troops have invaded from Canada. With most of the Northern troops withdrawn to fight the new enemy, General William Tecumseh Sherman and his weakened army stand alone against the Confederates. At sea, the wooden American navy faces the threat of the British iron battleship H.M.S. warrior. As Queen Victoria and her prime minister, Lord Palmerston, seek total destruction, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and President Lincoln must make crucial decisions under fierce pressure. Stars and Stripes Forever asks - and then fascinatingly answers - a central question: Could a divided, bloodied America have defeated England, or would the United States have ceased to exist for all time?"

Original Publication: Hodder & Stoughton, March 1998
This Edition: Ballantine, October 1998
Cover Art: Dennis Lyall
Format: Hardback

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Review:


The Stainless Steel Rat Joins the Circus

"Slippery Jim DiGritz. The galaxy's greatest thief and con artist; the Stainless Steel Rat. For novel upon novel, Jim DiGritz has outfoxed the forces of conventionality, cutting a stylish swathe through dozens of star systems. Now, Slippery Jim and his beautiful wife, Angelina, find themselves becalmed on a painfully boring backwater planet, with nothing to do but practice their skills at computer crime. Then they meet a billionaire who claims to be 40,000 years old, and he offers them millions of credits to investigate a string of unsolved interstellar bank robberies. Robberies which, it turns out, always happen when the circus is nearby. In a sense, the Stainless Steel Rat has always been a high-wire performer. Now, as he infiltrates the world of the galactic big top, he's taking the role to extremes - and drawing the attention of more dangerous ringmasters and strongmen than he ever expected. Will this be the final show? Has Slippery Jim finally leapt for his last trapeze? Naah."

Original Publication: Tor, November 1999
This Edition: Tor, November 1999
Cover Art: Julie Bell
Format: Hardback

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Review:


Stars and Stripes Triumphant

"America and England: for the two countries that share a language and conflict, the conflict began at the dawn of the American Civil War. Just as America was about to tear itself to pieces, Britain itself committed an act of war by seizing a U.S. packet ship. In retaliation, the Confederate States rejoined the Union and took up arms against England. Repulsing a British invasion, and defeating Her Majesty's Army first in Canada, then in Mexico, then in Ireland, American pride and power swelled. Britain, like a wounded lion, howeled in shame and anger. Now, Queen Victoria's empire is more dangerous than ever before, turning against the Irish on her own soil, flexing her naval might, and all but forcing a weary President Lincoln to authorize the next step in a headlong journey toward war."

Original Publication: Hodder & Stoughton, June 2002
This Edition: Del Rey/Ballantine, December 2003
Cover Art: Dennis Lyall
Format: Paperback

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Review:


A Stainless Steel Rat is Born

"In the auspicious annals of crime, chicanery and counter espionage, one name towers above all the rest Slippery Jim DeGritz, the fabled outlaw known and feared as The Stainless Steel Rat! Now, the uncanny, untold origins of the 25th century's most canny criminal can at last be revealed: A Stainless Steel Rat is Born. This final volume in the sage of James DiGritz explores his humble beginnings as a petty criminal on the backward planet of Bit O'Heaven, and his rapid rise to the most wanted man on a dozen worlds. And it contains the never-before-told story of the fabled archcriminal known as The Bishop, who tutored young Jim in the higher arts of crime and gave him his legendary nickname. A rousing, rollicking, often touching tale, A Stainless Steel Rat is Born is a stirring portrait of a man who learned to laugh at the laws that bind ordinary men."

Original Publication: Sphere, 1985
This Edition: Bantam Spectra, October 1985
Cover Art: Jim Burns
Format: Paperback

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Planet of the Damned

"Unfortunately Brian Brandd was a superman - Because Brian's Herculean task was to avert a war between two worlds that shared a single star. One of them was the most advanced in the galaxy, the other a living hell. Unfortunately the leaders of Dis, having issued a demand for unconditional surrender, refused further communication - and were eager to summarily execute anyone who dared land on their hellish planet. No one much cared what happened to the aggressors, but the destruction of Nyjord would be an irreplaceable loss to all mankind. Yet to save either world from annihilation, Brian must first redeem the Planet of the Damned"

Original Publication: Bantam, January 1962
This Edition: Tor, August 1982
Cover Art: Tom Kidd
Format: Paperback

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The Stainless Steel Rat Returns

"James Bolivar "Slippery Jim" DiGriz - Special Corps agent, master con man, interstellar criminal (retired) - is living high on the hog on the planet of Moolaplenty when a long-lost cousin and a shipful of swine arrive to drain his bank account and send him and his lovely wife, Angelina, wandering the stars on the wildest journey since Gulliver's Travels. In this darkly satiric work, Harry Harrison brings his most famous character out of retirement for a grand tour of the galaxy. The Stainless Steel Rat rides again: a cocktail in his hand, a smile on his lips and larceny in his heart, in search of adventure, gravitons, and a way to get rid of the pigs."

Original Publication: Tor, August 2010
This Edition: Gollancz, December 2011
Cover Art: Unknown
Format: Trade Paperback

Notes:

Review:

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